Alternatives to ClearDB logo

Alternatives to ClearDB

MySQL, Heroku Postgres, Firebase, Amazon RDS, and Amazon Aurora are the most popular alternatives and competitors to ClearDB.
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What is ClearDB and what are its top alternatives?

ClearDB uses a combination of advanced replication techniques, advanced cluster technology, and layered web services to provide you with a MySQL database that is "smarter" than usual.
ClearDB is a tool in the SQL Database as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to ClearDB

  • MySQL

    MySQL

    The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software. ...

  • Heroku Postgres

    Heroku Postgres

    Heroku Postgres provides a SQL database-as-a-service that lets you focus on building your application instead of messing around with database management. ...

  • Firebase

    Firebase

    Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds. ...

  • Amazon RDS

    Amazon RDS

    Amazon RDS gives you access to the capabilities of a familiar MySQL, Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server database engine. This means that the code, applications, and tools you already use today with your existing databases can be used with Amazon RDS. Amazon RDS automatically patches the database software and backs up your database, storing the backups for a user-defined retention period and enabling point-in-time recovery. You benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with your Database Instance (DB Instance) via a single API call. ...

  • Amazon Aurora

    Amazon Aurora

    Amazon Aurora is a MySQL-compatible, relational database engine that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. Amazon Aurora provides up to five times better performance than MySQL at a price point one tenth that of a commercial database while delivering similar performance and availability. ...

  • Google Cloud SQL

    Google Cloud SQL

    MySQL databases deployed in the cloud without a fuss. Google Cloud Platform provides you with powerful databases that run fast, don’t run out of space and give your application the redundant, reliable storage it needs. ...

  • Azure SQL Database

    Azure SQL Database

    It is the intelligent, scalable, cloud database service that provides the broadest SQL Server engine compatibility and up to a 212% return on investment. It is a database service that can quickly and efficiently scale to meet demand, is automatically highly available, and supports a variety of third party software. ...

  • DigitalOcean Managed Databases

    DigitalOcean Managed Databases

    Build apps and store data in minutes with easy access to one or more databases and sleep better knowing your data is backed up and optimized. ...

ClearDB alternatives & related posts

MySQL logo

MySQL

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The world's most popular open source database
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PROS OF MYSQL
  • 793
    Sql
  • 673
    Free
  • 556
    Easy
  • 527
    Widely used
  • 485
    Open source
  • 180
    High availability
  • 160
    Cross-platform support
  • 104
    Great community
  • 78
    Secure
  • 75
    Full-text indexing and searching
  • 25
    Fast, open, available
  • 14
    SSL support
  • 13
    Reliable
  • 13
    Robust
  • 8
    Enterprise Version
  • 7
    Easy to set up on all platforms
  • 2
    NoSQL access to JSON data type
  • 1
    Relational database
  • 1
    Easy, light, scalable
  • 1
    Sequel Pro (best SQL GUI)
  • 1
    Replica Support
CONS OF MYSQL
  • 14
    Owned by a company with their own agenda
  • 1
    Can't roll back schema changes

related MySQL posts

Tim Abbott

We've been using PostgreSQL since the very early days of Zulip, but we actually didn't use it from the beginning. Zulip started out as a MySQL project back in 2012, because we'd heard it was a good choice for a startup with a wide community. However, we found that even though we were using the Django ORM for most of our database access, we spent a lot of time fighting with MySQL. Issues ranged from bad collation defaults, to bad query plans which required a lot of manual query tweaks.

We ended up getting so frustrated that we tried out PostgresQL, and the results were fantastic. We didn't have to do any real customization (just some tuning settings for how big a server we had), and all of our most important queries were faster out of the box. As a result, we were able to delete a bunch of custom queries escaping the ORM that we'd written to make the MySQL query planner happy (because postgres just did the right thing automatically).

And then after that, we've just gotten a ton of value out of postgres. We use its excellent built-in full-text search, which has helped us avoid needing to bring in a tool like Elasticsearch, and we've really enjoyed features like its partial indexes, which saved us a lot of work adding unnecessary extra tables to get good performance for things like our "unread messages" and "starred messages" indexes.

I can't recommend it highly enough.

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Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 21 upvotes · 1.1M views

Our most popular (& controversial!) article to date on the Uber Engineering blog in 3+ yrs. Why we moved from PostgreSQL to MySQL. In essence, it was due to a variety of limitations of Postgres at the time. Fun fact -- earlier in Uber's history we'd actually moved from MySQL to Postgres before switching back for good, & though we published the article in Summer 2016 we haven't looked back since:

The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL (https://eng.uber.com/schemaless-part-one/). In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL:

https://eng.uber.com/mysql-migration/

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Heroku Postgres logo

Heroku Postgres

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Heroku's Database-as-a-Service. Based on the most powerful open-source database, PostgreSQL
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PROS OF HEROKU POSTGRES
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    Easy to setup
  • 3
    Follower databases
  • 3
    Dataclips for sharing queries
  • 3
    Extremely reliable
CONS OF HEROKU POSTGRES
  • 2
    Super expensive

related Heroku Postgres posts

PostgreSQL Heroku Heroku Postgres Node.js Knex.js

Last week we rolled out a simple patch that decimated the response time of a Postgres query crucial to Checkly. It quite literally went from an average of ~100ms with peaks to 1 second to a steady 1ms to 10ms.

However, that patch was just the last step of a longer journey:

  1. I looked at what API endpoints were using which queries and how their response time grew over time. Specifically the customer facing API endpoints that are directly responsible for rendering the first dashboard page of the product are crucial.

  2. I looked at the Heroku metrics such as those reported by heroku pg:outlier and cross references that with "slowest response time" statistics.

  3. I reproduced the production situation as best as possible on a local development machine and test my hypothesis that an composite index on a uuid field and a timestampz field would reduce response times.

This method secured the victory and we rolled out a new index last week. Response times plummeted. Read the full story in the blog post.

See more

I could spin up an Amazon EC2 instance and install PostgreSQL myself, review latest configuration best practices, sort Amazon EBS storage for data, set up a snapshot process etc.

Alternatively I could use Amazon RDS, Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL or Heroku Postgres and have most of that work handled for me, by a team of world experts...

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Firebase logo

Firebase

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The Realtime App Platform
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PROS OF FIREBASE
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    Realtime backend made easy
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    Fast and responsive
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    Easy setup
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    Real-time
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    JSON
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    Free
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    Backed by google
  • 83
    Angular adaptor
  • 66
    Reliable
  • 36
    Great customer support
  • 29
    Great documentation
  • 24
    Real-time synchronization
  • 21
    Mobile friendly
  • 18
    Rapid prototyping
  • 14
    Great security
  • 12
    Automatic scaling
  • 11
    Freakingly awesome
  • 8
    Chat
  • 8
    Angularfire is an amazing addition!
  • 8
    Super fast development
  • 6
    Ios adaptor
  • 6
    Awesome next-gen backend
  • 5
    Firebase hosting
  • 5
    Built in user auth/oauth
  • 4
    Very easy to use
  • 4
    Speed of light
  • 3
    Brilliant for startups
  • 3
    Great
  • 3
    It's made development super fast
  • 2
    Free authentication solution
  • 2
    Push notification
  • 2
    The concurrent updates create a great experience
  • 2
    I can quickly create static web apps with no backend
  • 2
    Great all-round functionality
  • 2
    JS Offline and Sync suport
  • 2
    Low battery consumption
  • 1
    CDN & cache out of the box
  • 1
    Faster workflow
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    Free SSL
  • 1
    Easy to use
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    Large
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    Serverless
  • 1
    .net
  • 1
    Good Free Limits
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    Easy Reactjs integration
  • 1
    Free hosting
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    Cloud functions
CONS OF FIREBASE
  • 29
    Can become expensive
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    No open source, you depend on external company
  • 15
    Scalability is not infinite
  • 9
    Not Flexible Enough
  • 5
    Cant filter queries
  • 3
    Very unstable server
  • 2
    No Relational Data
  • 2
    Too many errors
  • 2
    No offline sync

related Firebase posts

Stephen Gheysens
Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio · | 14 upvotes · 434.2K views

Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

See more
Tassanai Singprom

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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Amazon RDS logo

Amazon RDS

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Set up, operate, and scale a relational database in the cloud.
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PROS OF AMAZON RDS
  • 164
    Reliable failovers
  • 155
    Automated backups
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    Backed by amazon
  • 92
    Db snapshots
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    Multi-availability
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    Control iops, fast restore to point of time
  • 28
    Security
  • 24
    Elastic
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    Push-button scaling
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    Automatic software patching
  • 4
    Replication
  • 3
    Reliable
  • 2
    Isolation
CONS OF AMAZON RDS
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    related Amazon RDS posts

    Ganesa Vijayakumar
    Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 19 upvotes · 2.6M views

    I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

    I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

    As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

    UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

    Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

    Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

    Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

    Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

    Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

    Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

    Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

    Thanks, Ganesa

    See more
    John Kodumal

    As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

    We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

    See more
    Amazon Aurora logo

    Amazon Aurora

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    MySQL and PostgreSQL compatible relational database with several times better performance
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    PROS OF AMAZON AURORA
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      MySQL compatibility
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      Better performance
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      Easy read scalability
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      Speed
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      Low latency read replica
    • 2
      High IOPS cost
    • 1
      Good cost performance
    CONS OF AMAZON AURORA
    • 2
      Vendor locking
    • 1
      Rigid schema

    related Amazon Aurora posts

    Julien DeFrance
    Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 2.4M views

    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

    Future improvements / technology decisions included:

    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

    See more
    Tim Specht
    ‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash · | 13 upvotes · 102.5K views

    Over the years we have added a wide variety of different storages to our stack including PostgreSQL (some hosted by Heroku, some by Amazon RDS) for storing relational data, Amazon DynamoDB to store non-relational data like recommendations & user connections, or Redis to hold pre-aggregated data to speed up API endpoints.

    Since we started running Postgres ourselves on RDS instead of only using the managed offerings of Heroku, we've gained additional flexibility in scaling our application while reducing costs at the same time.

    We are also heavily testing Amazon RDS for Aurora in its Postgres-compatible version and will also give the new release of Aurora Serverless a try!

    #SqlDatabaseAsAService #NosqlDatabaseAsAService #Databases #PlatformAsAService

    See more
    Google Cloud SQL logo

    Google Cloud SQL

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    Store and manage data using a fully-managed, relational MySQL database
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    PROS OF GOOGLE CLOUD SQL
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      Fully managed
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      SQL
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      Backed by Google
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      Flexible
    • 3
      Encryption at rest and transit
    • 3
      Replication across multiple zone by default
    • 3
      Automatic Software Patching
    CONS OF GOOGLE CLOUD SQL
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      related Google Cloud SQL posts

      Suman Adhikari
      Full Stack (Founder) at Peuconomia Int'l Pvt. Ltd. · | 10 upvotes · 10.3K views

      We use Go for the first-off due to our knowledge of it. Second off, it's highly performant and optimized for scalability. We run it using dockerized containers for our backend REST APIs.

      For Frontend, we use React with Next.js at vercel. We use NextJS here mostly due to our need for Server Side Rendering and easier route management.

      For Database, we use MySQL as it is first-off free and always has been in use with us. We use Google Cloud SQL from GCP that manages its storage and versions along with HA.

      All stacks are free to use and get the best juice out of the system. We also use Redis for caching for enterprise-grade apps where data retrieval latency matters the most.

      See more
      Ido Shamun
      at The Elegant Monkeys · | 5 upvotes · 29.9K views

      As far as the backend goes, we first had to decide which database will power most of Daily services. Considering relational databases vs document datbases, we decided that the relational model is a better fit for Daily as we have a lot of connections between the different entities. At the time MySQL was the only service available on Google Cloud SQL so this was out choice. In terms of #backend development Node.js powers most of our services, thanks to its amazing ecosystem there are a lot of modules publicly available to shorten the development time. Go is for the light services which are all about performance and delivering quickly the response, such as our redirector service.

      See more
      Azure SQL Database logo

      Azure SQL Database

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      Managed, intelligent SQL in the cloud
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      PROS OF AZURE SQL DATABASE
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        Managed
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        Scalable
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        Secure
      CONS OF AZURE SQL DATABASE
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        related Azure SQL Database posts

        DigitalOcean Managed Databases logo

        DigitalOcean Managed Databases

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        Fully hosted and managed database engines for your applications, so you can focus on building, not patching
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        PROS OF DIGITALOCEAN MANAGED DATABASES
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          CONS OF DIGITALOCEAN MANAGED DATABASES
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            related DigitalOcean Managed Databases posts