BootstrapCDN

Decision at BootstrapCDN about PHP, MaxCDN, Bootstrap, GitHub, BuzzSumo, BootstrapCDN, OpenSource

Avatar of jdorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare ·
PHPPHP
MaxCDNMaxCDN
BootstrapBootstrap
GitHubGitHub
#BuzzSumo
#BootstrapCDN
#OpenSource

The following will be a series of decisions we made that took #BootstrapCDN from 0 to over 74 billion requests a month (and growing).

Initially, I didn’t want to do #BootstrapCDN. I have attempted a few projects like it before and they always failed to gain any traction. In June of 2012, my boss at the time (and good friend today), David Henzel got a #BuzzSumo Alert coming from an #OpenSource project on GitHub called Bootstrap and someone mentioned that MaxCDN was always looking for projects to sponsor. Long story short, David registered the domain and told me to get to work.

The first version of the site was written in PHP. It was quick and dirty but met the scope. We beta tested it for a month then people started to use it after searching for “bootstrap cdn” on Google.

I was still skeptical until, well, that’s for the next decision.

AMA below.

18 upvotes·1 comment·7.8K views

Decision at BootstrapCDN about Ruby, Node.js, Amazon S3, MaxCDN, Google Analytics, Bootstrap, BootstrapCDN

Avatar of jdorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare ·
RubyRuby
Node.jsNode.js
Amazon S3Amazon S3
MaxCDNMaxCDN
Google AnalyticsGoogle Analytics
BootstrapBootstrap
#BootstrapCDN

This is the second Stack Decision of this series. You can read the last one to catch up (link below).

I was skeptical until one of the co-authors of Bootstrap, Jacob Thornton aka 'fat' tweeted about #BootstrapCDN and according to Google Analytics, that sent 10k uniques to the site in 24 hours. Now I was pumped but I knew I was way over my head and needed help. Fortunately, I met my co-maintainer Josh Mervine at the 2013 O’Reilly Velocity Conference and we hit it off immediately. I showed him the MaxCDN and Amazon S3 stats and his eyebrows went up. When I showed him the code, he was very polite, “well, I mean it works but I really want to try Node.js out so I’m just going to rewrite everything in Node and Ruby for the S3 scripts.

I didn’t know what to expect from Josh to be honest. In the next decision (part 3), I will go over how he completely transformed the project.

AMA below.

14 upvotes·5.7K views

Decision at BootstrapCDN about Vim, Pug, ExpressJS, Node.js, Bootswatch, Amazon S3, YAML

Avatar of jdorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare ·
VimVim
PugPug
ExpressJSExpressJS
Node.jsNode.js
BootswatchBootswatch
Amazon S3Amazon S3
#YAML

This is the third Stack Decision of this series. You can read the last one to catch up (link below).

Josh is a machine. He cranked out the rewrite of the site and as well as the Amazon S3 syncing/permissions/content-type scripts in less than a week (with a full time job + 2 small kids at the time). The new site had/has a section where you could try out all of the Bootswatch themes on our site and while it might sound silly, it showed me that he goes above and beyond and I totally lucked out.

Anyway, Josh decided to go with Node.js, ExpressJS, Jade (now called Pug), and configs with #yaml, all things I have read about but never used in production. I quickly found out Josh was a Vim user (still is), because every Jade file he worked on had //- vim: ft=jade sw=4 sts=4 et: at the bottom.

Everything was running smoothly, I was encouraged by David (co-founder from part 1) to take a vacation. I took him up on that. Unfortunately my timing couldn’t have been worse. More on that in part 4.

AMA below.

3 upvotes·1 comment·1.8K views