Alternatives to Dgraph logo

Alternatives to Dgraph

Neo4j, Titan, ArangoDB, GraphQL, and Cayley are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Dgraph.
24
31
+ 1
2

What is Dgraph and what are its top alternatives?

Dgraph's goal is to provide Google production level scale and throughput, with low enough latency to be serving real time user queries, over terabytes of structured data. Dgraph supports GraphQL-like query syntax, and responds in JSON and Protocol Buffers over GRPC and HTTP.
Dgraph is a tool in the Graph Databases category of a tech stack.
Dgraph is an open source tool with 11.7K GitHub stars and 819 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Dgraph's open source repository on GitHub

Dgraph alternatives & related posts

Titan logo

Titan

29
18
0
29
18
+ 1
0
Distributed Graph Database
    Be the first to leave a pro
    Titan logo
    Titan
    VS
    Dgraph logo
    Dgraph

    related GraphQL posts

    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Node.js
    Node.js

    I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

    For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

    1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

    2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

    3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

    See more
    Nick Rockwell
    Nick Rockwell
    CTO at NY Times · | 27 upvotes · 325.6K views
    atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
    Apache HTTP Server
    Apache HTTP Server
    Kafka
    Kafka
    Node.js
    Node.js
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    Apollo
    Apollo
    React
    React
    PHP
    PHP
    MySQL
    MySQL

    When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

    So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

    React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

    Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

    See more
    Cayley logo

    Cayley

    9
    22
    5
    9
    22
    + 1
    5
    An open-source graph database
    Cayley logo
    Cayley
    VS
    Dgraph logo
    Dgraph
    MongoDB logo

    MongoDB

    16.6K
    13.1K
    3.8K
    16.6K
    13.1K
    + 1
    3.8K
    The database for giant ideas
    MongoDB logo
    MongoDB
    VS
    Dgraph logo
    Dgraph

    related MongoDB posts

    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 24 upvotes · 280K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    Zappa
    Zappa
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    SQLAlchemy
    SQLAlchemy
    Python
    Python
    Amazon SQS
    Amazon SQS
    Node.js
    Node.js
    MongoDB Stitch
    MongoDB Stitch
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB

    Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

    We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

    Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

    We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

    We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

    In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

    Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

    In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

    See more
    Robert Zuber
    Robert Zuber
    CTO at CircleCI · | 22 upvotes · 161.8K views
    atCircleCICircleCI
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Redis
    Redis
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB

    We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

    As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

    When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

    See more
    JanusGraph logo

    JanusGraph

    5
    2
    0
    5
    2
    + 1
    0
    Open-source, distributed graph database
      Be the first to leave a pro
      JanusGraph logo
      JanusGraph
      VS
      Dgraph logo
      Dgraph
      RedisGraph logo

      RedisGraph

      5
      14
      0
      5
      14
      + 1
      0
      A High Performance In-Memory Graph Database as a Redis Module
        Be the first to leave a pro
        RedisGraph logo
        RedisGraph
        VS
        Dgraph logo
        Dgraph
        Graph Engine logo

        Graph Engine

        4
        14
        0
        4
        14
        + 1
        0
        RAM Store + Computation Engine + Graph Model (by Microsoft)
        Graph Engine logo
        Graph Engine
        VS
        Dgraph logo
        Dgraph
        Blazegraph logo

        Blazegraph

        3
        0
        3
        3
        0
        + 1
        3
        An ultra-high performance database for big graphs offering both Semantic Web and Graph Database
        Blazegraph logo
        Blazegraph
        VS
        Dgraph logo
        Dgraph
        DSE Graph logo

        DSE Graph

        2
        3
        0
        2
        3
        + 1
        0
        A distributed graph database that is optimized for enterprise applications
          Be the first to leave a pro
          DSE Graph logo
          DSE Graph
          VS
          Dgraph logo
          Dgraph
          Memgraph logo

          Memgraph

          1
          0
          0
          1
          0
          + 1
          0
          It is a database which understands the relationships between its data points, generating meaning just like a humans
            Be the first to leave a pro
            Memgraph logo
            Memgraph
            VS
            Dgraph logo
            Dgraph
            Beam logo

            Beam

            1
            8
            0
            1
            8
            + 1
            0
            A Distributed Knowledge Graph Store
              Be the first to leave a pro
              Beam logo
              Beam
              VS
              Dgraph logo
              Dgraph