Alternatives to GWT logo

Alternatives to GWT

JavaFX, Vaadin, Angular, Spring, and Dart are the most popular alternatives and competitors to GWT.
84
91
+ 1
0

What is GWT and what are its top alternatives?

It is a development toolkit for building and optimizing complex browser-based applications. Its goal is to enable productive development of high-performance web applications without the developer having to be an expert in browser quirks, XMLHttpRequest, and JavaScript.
GWT is a tool in the Javascript UI Libraries category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to GWT

  • JavaFX
    JavaFX

    It is a set of graphics and media packages that enables developers to design, create, test, debug, and deploy rich client applications that operate consistently across diverse platforms. ...

  • Vaadin
    Vaadin

    It is the fastest way to build web applications in Java. It automates the communication between your server and the browser and gives you a high-level component API for all Vaadin components ...

  • Angular
    Angular

    It is a TypeScript-based open-source web application framework. It is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications. ...

  • Spring
    Spring

    A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments. ...

  • Dart
    Dart

    Dart is a cohesive, scalable platform for building apps that run on the web (where you can use Polymer) or on servers (such as with Google Cloud Platform). Use the Dart language, libraries, and tools to write anything from simple scripts to full-featured apps. ...

  • React
    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • JSF
    JSF

    It is used for building component-based user interfaces for web applications and was formalized as a standard through the Java Community ...

  • Blazor
    Blazor

    Blazor is a .NET web framework that runs in any browser. You author Blazor apps using C#/Razor and HTML. ...

GWT alternatives & related posts

JavaFX logo

JavaFX

260
368
10
A Java library for building Rich Internet Applications
260
368
+ 1
10
PROS OF JAVAFX
  • 10
    Light
CONS OF JAVAFX
  • 1
    Community support less than qt
  • 1
    Complicated

related JavaFX posts

Vaadin logo

Vaadin

171
255
34
Components and tools for building web apps in Java
171
255
+ 1
34
PROS OF VAADIN
  • 8
    Java
  • 7
    Compatibility
  • 6
    Open Source
  • 5
    Components
  • 3
    Performance
  • 2
    Abstraction
  • 2
    Example packages
  • 1
    OSGI Support
CONS OF VAADIN
  • 3
    Paid for more features

related Vaadin posts

Angular logo

Angular

1.9K
4.2K
472
A platform for building mobile and desktop web applications
1.9K
4.2K
+ 1
472
PROS OF ANGULAR
  • 104
    It's a powerful framework
  • 51
    Straight-forward architecture
  • 44
    TypeScript
  • 42
    Great UI and Business Logic separation
  • 40
    Powerful, maintainable, fast
  • 38
    Amazing CLI
  • 31
    Great mvc
  • 26
    Powerfull Dependency Injection
  • 18
    Easy to build
  • 15
    Opinionated, batteries-included approach
  • 14
    All in one Framework
  • 9
    Solid Standard Setup.
  • 9
    Schematics
  • 7
    Structured
  • 7
    Performance
  • 5
    Complex
  • 4
    Only for single page applications
  • 3
    Builders
  • 2
    Ng upgrade
  • 2
    RxJS
  • 1
    React
CONS OF ANGULAR
  • 9
    Overcomplicated
  • 9
    Large overhead in file size and initialization time
  • 2
    Ugly code
  • 2
    CLI not open to other test and linting tools

related Angular posts

When Redash was created 5 years ago we chose AngularJS as our frontend framework, but as AngularJS was replaced by Angular 2 we had to make a new choice. We decided that we won't migrate to Angular, but to either React or Vue.js. Eventually we decided to migrate to React for the following reasons:

  1. Many in our community are already using React internally and will be able to contribute.
  2. Using react2angular we can do the migration gradually over time instead of having to invest in a big rewrite while halting feature development.

So far the gradual strategy pays off and in the last 3 major releases we already shipped React code in the Angular.js application.

See more
Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 10 upvotes · 495.1K views

From my experience of the early startup world, a majority of companies these days use Node.js. Python and Go are the next biggest languages, but significantly smaller than Node.

However, if you're having trouble with the front end aspect of Django, using Node probably won't make that easier for you. You'll have a lot more options between front end frameworks (React, Vue.js, Angular 2) , but they'll definitely take more time to learn than Django's templating system.

Think about whether you want to focus on front end or back end for now, and make a decision from there.

See more
Spring logo

Spring

3.7K
4.4K
1.1K
Provides a comprehensive programming and configuration model for modern Java-based enterprise applications
3.7K
4.4K
+ 1
1.1K
PROS OF SPRING
  • 226
    Java
  • 156
    Open source
  • 134
    Great community
  • 122
    Very powerful
  • 114
    Enterprise
  • 64
    Lot of great subprojects
  • 59
    Easy setup
  • 44
    Convention , configuration, done
  • 40
    Standard
  • 30
    Love the logic
  • 12
    Good documentation
  • 11
    Dependency injection
  • 10
    Stability
  • 8
    MVC
  • 6
    Easy
  • 3
    Makes the hard stuff fun & the easy stuff automatic
  • 3
    Strong typing
  • 2
    Code maintenance
  • 2
    Best practices
  • 2
    Maven
  • 2
    Great Desgin
  • 2
    Easy Integration with Spring Security
  • 2
    Integrations with most other Java frameworks
  • 1
    Java has more support and more libraries
  • 1
    Supports vast databases
  • 1
    Large ecosystem with seamless integration
  • 1
    OracleDb integration
  • 1
    Live project
CONS OF SPRING
  • 15
    Draws you into its own ecosystem and bloat
  • 3
    Verbose configuration
  • 3
    Poor documentation
  • 3
    Java
  • 2
    Java is more verbose language in compare to python

related Spring posts

Is learning Spring and Spring Boot for web apps back-end development is still relevant in 2021? Feel free to share your views with comparison to Django/Node.js/ ExpressJS or other frameworks.

Please share some good beginner resources to start learning about spring/spring boot framework to build the web apps.

See more

I am consulting for a company that wants to move its current CubeCart e-commerce site to another PHP based platform like PrestaShop or Magento. I was interested in alternatives that utilize Node.js as the primary platform. I currently don't know PHP, but I have done full stack dev with Java, Spring, Thymeleaf, etc.. I am just unsure that learning a set of technologies not commonly used makes sense. For example, in PrestaShop, I would need to work with JavaScript better and learn PHP, Twig, and Bootstrap. It seems more cumbersome than a Node JS system, where the language syntax stays the same for the full stack. I am looking for thoughts and advice on the relevance of PHP skillset into the future AND whether the Node based e-commerce open source options can compete with Magento or Prestashop.

See more
Dart logo

Dart

3.1K
3.3K
436
A new web programming language with libraries, a virtual machine, and tools
3.1K
3.3K
+ 1
436
PROS OF DART
  • 57
    Backed by Google
  • 50
    Flutter
  • 39
    Twice the speed of Javascript
  • 34
    Great tools
  • 29
    Scalable
  • 26
    Open source
  • 24
    Made for the future
  • 24
    Can be used on Frontend
  • 22
    Angular Dart
  • 22
    Polymer Dart
  • 17
    Cross platform
  • 16
    Like Java
  • 13
    Easy to learn
  • 13
    Dartanalyzer
  • 12
    Runs on Google Cloud Platform
  • 9
    Easy to Understand
  • 9
    Amazing concurrency primitives
  • 8
    Is to JS what C is to ASM
  • 6
    Flutter works with darts
  • 3
    R
  • 3
    Can run Dart in AWS Lambda
CONS OF DART
  • 3
    Lack of ORM
  • 3
    Locked in - JS or TS interop is very hard to accomplish
  • 0
    A

related Dart posts

Jose Luis Alvarado Ramirez

The only two programming languages I know are Python and Dart, I fall in love with Dart when I learned about the type safeness, ease of refactoring, and the help of the IDE. I have an idea for an app, a simple app, but I need SEO and server rendering, and I also want it to be available on all platforms. I can't use Flutter or Dart anymore because of that. I have been searching and looks like there is no way to avoid learning HTML and CSS for this. I want to use Supabase as BASS, at the moment I think that I have two options if I want to learn the least amount of things because of my lack of time available:

  1. Quasar Framework: They claim that I can do all the things I need, but I have to use JavaScript, and I am going to have all those bugs with a type-safe programming language avoidable. I guess I can use TypeScript?, but that means learning both, and I am not sure if I will be able to use 100% Typescript. Besides Vue.js, Node.js, etc.

  2. Blazor and .NET: There is MAUI with razor bindings in .Net now, and also a Blazor server. And as far as I can see, the transition from Dart to C# will be easy. I guess that I have to learn some Javascript here and there, but I have to less things I guess, am I wrong? But Blazor is a new technology, Vue is widely used.

See more
Shared insights
on
DartDartFlutterFlutter

Hi, I'm considering building a social marketplace app on android, ios and web, Flutter seems to be a good UI framework for cross-platform apps, it's safe type, hot reload, and native compiling on native machine code (thanks to Dart). My question is, for an MVP product is it a good choice? if yes, will it be on the mid-term, long term? Or will I have to change as the users grow?

thank you

See more
React logo

React

146.9K
121.5K
4K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
146.9K
121.5K
+ 1
4K
PROS OF REACT
  • 802
    Components
  • 663
    Virtual dom
  • 572
    Performance
  • 501
    Simplicity
  • 442
    Composable
  • 183
    Data flow
  • 165
    Declarative
  • 126
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 116
    Reactive updates
  • 113
    Explicit app state
  • 44
    JSX
  • 27
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 20
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 20
    Easy to Use
  • 16
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 11
    Great perfomance
  • 9
    Built by Facebook
  • 9
    Javascript
  • 7
    TypeScript support
  • 6
    Speed
  • 5
    Hooks
  • 5
    Excellent Documentation
  • 5
    Props
  • 5
    Functional
  • 5
    Easy as Lego
  • 5
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 5
    Cross-platform
  • 5
    Server Side Rendering
  • 5
    Feels like the 90s
  • 5
    Easy to start
  • 5
    Awesome
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 4
    Strong Community
  • 4
    Server side views
  • 4
    Fancy third party tools
  • 4
    Scales super well
  • 4
    Start simple
  • 4
    Super easy
  • 3
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 3
    Fast evolving
  • 3
    SSR
  • 3
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 3
    Rich ecosystem
  • 3
    Simple
  • 3
    Has functional components
  • 3
    Allows creating single page applications
  • 3
    Has arrow functions
  • 3
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 3
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 3
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 3
    Just the View of MVC
  • 2
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 2
    Fragments
  • 2
    Sharable
  • 2
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 2
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Image upload
  • 1
    HTML-like
  • 1
    Recharts
CONS OF REACT
  • 38
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 27
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 26
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 10
    JSX
  • 8
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 6
    One-way binding only
  • 3
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 3
    Bad Documentation
  • 2
    Paradigms change too fast
  • 2
    Error boundary is needed

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 2.3M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Adebayo Akinlaja
Engineering Manager at Andela · | 29 upvotes · 1.6M views

I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

See more
JSF logo

JSF

128
210
4
It is used for building component-based web interfaces
128
210
+ 1
4
PROS OF JSF
  • 2
    Rich and comprehensive Request Life-cycle
  • 1
    Very Mature UI framework
  • 1
    Server Side component
CONS OF JSF
    Be the first to leave a con

    related JSF posts

    Hello guys! I would ask for your advice. Our situation is like that there will be a project to revamp workflows and introduce new services like mobile apps, machine learning, and some online services that would use cloud storage. We use JSF, JavaScript, Ajax, Spring, Oracle 12c running on Linux (VM) and providing online services to internal users and the public. But, we are not technically savvy enough to evaluate what tools should be introduced. Personally, I am evaluating whether to take this opportunity to change our practice/PM approach from Prince to Scrum/Agile (It seemed that DevOps is popular) ... Since we adopt ISO 27001 and ISO 20000, security is a crucial factor that we consider. Would you please help to recommend a list of tools and explain the reasons why you recommend them? Thanks in advance~!

    See more

    I need to modernize a Java web application that runs on JSF. I am used to building websites, so Bootstrap kinda feels like "home." But when it comes to applications, I feel Bootstrap is not the right way to go. Can someone explain to me what PrimeFaces is capable of in comparison with BS?

    See more
    Blazor logo

    Blazor

    454
    611
    423
    An experimental web UI framework using C#/Razor and HTML, running in the browser via WebAssembly
    454
    611
    + 1
    423
    PROS OF BLAZOR
    • 60
      Uses C#
    • 47
      No need to learn separate language or technology
    • 40
      Supports making a single page application
    • 38
      Tight integration with .NET project
    • 36
      Uses .NET standard library
    • 29
      Very little JavaScript required
    • 28
      Components
    • 26
      No need to compile, bundle and deploy separately
    • 26
      Shared classes between client and server
    • 23
      Cross Platform
    • 20
      Has Server AND Client hosting models
    • 17
      Very easy JavaScript interop if required
    • 16
      Third party state management i.e. Blazor-State
    • 13
      App state can be managed singleton objects
    • 3
      Portable Code across Mobile, Web and Desktop
    • 1
      Work with Electron/MAUI
    CONS OF BLAZOR
    • 3
      Initial load time
    • 2
      Hard to inject javascript

    related Blazor posts

    Jose Luis Alvarado Ramirez

    The only two programming languages I know are Python and Dart, I fall in love with Dart when I learned about the type safeness, ease of refactoring, and the help of the IDE. I have an idea for an app, a simple app, but I need SEO and server rendering, and I also want it to be available on all platforms. I can't use Flutter or Dart anymore because of that. I have been searching and looks like there is no way to avoid learning HTML and CSS for this. I want to use Supabase as BASS, at the moment I think that I have two options if I want to learn the least amount of things because of my lack of time available:

    1. Quasar Framework: They claim that I can do all the things I need, but I have to use JavaScript, and I am going to have all those bugs with a type-safe programming language avoidable. I guess I can use TypeScript?, but that means learning both, and I am not sure if I will be able to use 100% Typescript. Besides Vue.js, Node.js, etc.

    2. Blazor and .NET: There is MAUI with razor bindings in .Net now, and also a Blazor server. And as far as I can see, the transition from Dart to C# will be easy. I guess that I have to learn some Javascript here and there, but I have to less things I guess, am I wrong? But Blazor is a new technology, Vue is widely used.

    See more