Decision at Gratify Commerce about Amazon SQS, Ruby, Sidekiq, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Rails, delayed_job, BackgroundProcessing

Avatar of jeromedalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare ·

delayed_job is a great Rails background job library for new projects, as it only uses what you already have: a relational database. We happily used it during the company’s first two years.

But it started to falter as our web and database transactions significantly grew. Our app interacted with users via SMS texts sent inside background jobs. Because the delayed_job daemon ran every couple seconds, this meant that users often waited several long seconds before getting text replies, which was not acceptable. Moreover, job processing was done inside AWS Elastic Beanstalk web instances, which were already under stress and not meant to handle jobs.

We needed a fast background job system that could process jobs in near real-time and integrate well with AWS. Sidekiq is a fast and popular Ruby background job library, but it does not leverage the Elastic Beanstalk worker architecture, and you have to maintain a Redis instance.

We ended up choosing active-elastic-job, which seamlessly integrates with worker instances and Amazon SQS. SQS is a fast queue and you don’t need to worry about infrastructure or scaling, as AWS handles it for you.

We noticed significant performance gains immediately after making the switch.

#BackgroundProcessing

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Avatar of Jerome Dalbert

Jerome Dalbert

Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare