Decision about Visual Studio Code, Atom, Vim, Sublime Text, TextEditor

Avatar of jeromedalbert
Backend Engineer at StackShare ·
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
AtomAtom
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Sublime TextSublime Text
#TextEditor

I liked Sublime Text for its speed, simplicity and keyboard shortcuts which synergize well when working on scripting languages like Ruby and JavaScript. I extended the editor with custom Python scripts that improved keyboard navigability such as autofocusing the sidebar when no files are open, or changing tab closing behavior.

But customization can only get you so far, and there were little things that I still had to use the mouse for, such as scrolling, repositioning lines on the screen, selecting the line number of a failing test stack trace from a separate plugin pane, etc. After 3 years of wearily moving my arm and hand to perform the same repetitive tasks, I decided to switch to Vim for 3 reasons:

  • your fingers literally don’t ever need to leave the keyboard home row (I had to remap the escape key though)
  • it is a reliable tool that has been around for more than 30 years and will still be around for the next 30 years
  • I wanted to "look like a hacker" by doing everything inside my terminal and by becoming a better Unix citizen

The learning curve is very steep and it took me a year to master it, but investing time to be truly comfortable with my #TextEditor was more than worth it. To me, Vim comes close to being the perfect editor and I probably won’t need to switch ever again. It feels good to ignore new editors that come out every few years, like Atom and Visual Studio Code.

7 upvotes·3.3K views
Avatar of Jerome Dalbert

Jerome Dalbert

Backend Engineer at StackShare