Alternatives to Aurelia logo

Alternatives to Aurelia

Angular 2, React, AngularJS, Svelte, and Blazor are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Aurelia.
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What is Aurelia and what are its top alternatives?

Aurelia is a next generation JavaScript client framework that leverages simple conventions to empower your creativity.
Aurelia is a tool in the Javascript MVC Frameworks category of a tech stack.
Aurelia is an open source tool with 11.6K GitHub stars and 685 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Aurelia's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Aurelia

  • Angular 2

    Angular 2

    It is a TypeScript-based open-source web application framework. It is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications. ...

  • React

    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • AngularJS

    AngularJS

    AngularJS lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser. It lets you use good old HTML (or HAML, Jade and friends!) as your template language and lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your application’s components clearly and succinctly. It automatically synchronizes data from your UI (view) with your JavaScript objects (model) through 2-way data binding. ...

  • Svelte

    Svelte

    If you've ever built a JavaScript application, the chances are you've encountered – or at least heard of – frameworks like React, Angular, Vue and Ractive. Like Svelte, these tools all share a goal of making it easy to build slick interactive user interfaces. Rather than interpreting your application code at run time, your app is converted into ideal JavaScript at build time. That means you don't pay the performance cost of the framework's abstractions, or incur a penalty when your app first loads. ...

  • Blazor

    Blazor

    Blazor is a .NET web framework that runs in any browser. You author Blazor apps using C#/Razor and HTML. ...

  • Vue.js

    Vue.js

    It is a library for building interactive web interfaces. It provides data-reactive components with a simple and flexible API. ...

  • Backbone.js

    Backbone.js

    Backbone supplies structure to JavaScript-heavy applications by providing models key-value binding and custom events, collections with a rich API of enumerable functions, views with declarative event handling, and connects it all to your existing application over a RESTful JSON interface. ...

  • Ember.js

    Ember.js

    A JavaScript framework that does all of the heavy lifting that you'd normally have to do by hand. There are tasks that are common to every web app; It does those things for you, so you can focus on building killer features and UI. ...

Aurelia alternatives & related posts

Angular 2 logo

Angular 2

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3.3K
407
A platform for building mobile and desktop web applications
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+ 1
407
PROS OF ANGULAR 2
  • 92
    It's a powerful framework
  • 47
    Straight-forward architecture
  • 39
    Great UI and Business Logic separation
  • 37
    Powerful, maintainable, fast
  • 37
    TypeScript
  • 33
    Amazing CLI
  • 30
    Great mvc
  • 22
    Powerfull Dependency Injection
  • 17
    Easy to build
  • 12
    Opinionated, batteries-included approach
  • 9
    All in one Framework
  • 7
    Solid Standard Setup.
  • 7
    Schematics
  • 6
    Structured
  • 5
    Performance
  • 3
    Only for single page applications
  • 3
    Complex
  • 1
    Builders
  • 0
    React
CONS OF ANGULAR 2
  • 7
    Large overhead in file size and initialization time
  • 6
    Overcomplicated
  • 2
    CLI not open to other test and linting tools
  • 1
    Ugly code

related Angular 2 posts

When Redash was created 5 years ago we chose AngularJS as our frontend framework, but as AngularJS was replaced by Angular 2 we had to make a new choice. We decided that we won't migrate to Angular, but to either React or Vue.js. Eventually we decided to migrate to React for the following reasons:

  1. Many in our community are already using React internally and will be able to contribute.
  2. Using react2angular we can do the migration gradually over time instead of having to invest in a big rewrite while halting feature development.

So far the gradual strategy pays off and in the last 3 major releases we already shipped React code in the Angular.js application.

See more
Max Musing
Founder & CEO at BaseDash · | 9 upvotes · 161.2K views

From my experience of the early startup world, a majority of companies these days use Node.js. Python and Go are the next biggest languages, but significantly smaller than Node.

However, if you're having trouble with the front end aspect of Django, using Node probably won't make that easier for you. You'll have a lot more options between front end frameworks (React, Vue.js, Angular 2) , but they'll definitely take more time to learn than Django's templating system.

Think about whether you want to focus on front end or back end for now, and make a decision from there.

See more
React logo

React

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68.7K
3.7K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
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68.7K
+ 1
3.7K
PROS OF REACT
  • 738
    Components
  • 646
    Virtual dom
  • 553
    Performance
  • 478
    Simplicity
  • 434
    Composable
  • 171
    Data flow
  • 157
    Declarative
  • 122
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 112
    Reactive updates
  • 109
    Explicit app state
  • 29
    JSX
  • 21
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 17
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 16
    Easy to Use
  • 14
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 9
    Great perfomance
  • 6
    Built by Facebook
  • 4
    Javascript
  • 4
    Feels like the 90s
  • 4
    Speed
  • 4
    Scalable
  • 3
    TypeScript support
  • 3
    Functional
  • 3
    Easy to start
  • 3
    Server side views
  • 2
    Fast evolving
  • 2
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 2
    SSR
  • 2
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 2
    Fancy third party tools
  • 2
    Excellent Documentation
  • 2
    Scales super well
  • 2
    Just the View of MVC
  • 2
    Server Side Rendering
  • 2
    Awesome
  • 2
    Cross-platform
  • 2
    Hooks
  • 2
    Rich ecosystem
  • 1
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 1
    Props
  • 1
    Fragments
  • 1
    Sharable
  • 1
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 1
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Super easy
  • 1
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 1
    Has functional components
  • 1
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 1
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 1
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 1
    Strong Community
  • 1
    Has arrow functions
  • 1
    Allows creating single page applications
  • 1
    Simple
  • 0
    Start simple
CONS OF REACT
  • 31
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 19
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 18
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 6
    JSX
  • 6
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 1
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 1
    One-way binding only

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 1.4M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 26 upvotes · 287.1K views
Shared insights
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

See more
AngularJS logo

AngularJS

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27.3K
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Superheroic JavaScript MVW Framework
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PROS OF ANGULARJS
  • 885
    Quick to develop
  • 589
    Great mvc
  • 571
    Powerful
  • 522
    Restful
  • 504
    Backed by google
  • 350
    Two-way data binding
  • 344
    Javascript
  • 329
    Open source
  • 306
    Dependency injection
  • 197
    Readable
  • 75
    Fast
  • 64
    Directives
  • 63
    Great community
  • 55
    Free
  • 38
    Extend html vocabulary
  • 29
    Components
  • 25
    Easy to test
  • 24
    Easy to learn
  • 23
    Easy to templates
  • 23
    Great documentation
  • 21
    Easy to start
  • 17
    Awesome
  • 17
    Light weight
  • 14
    Angular 2.0
  • 14
    Javascript mvw framework
  • 13
    Great extensions
  • 13
    Efficient
  • 10
    Easy to prototype with
  • 8
    High performance
  • 8
    Lots of community modules
  • 8
    Coffeescript
  • 7
    Two-way binding
  • 7
    Mvc
  • 6
    Easy to e2e
  • 6
    Clean and keeps code readable
  • 5
    One of the best frameworks
  • 5
    Easy for small applications
  • 4
    Works great with jquery
  • 4
    Fast development
  • 2
    Hierarchical Data Structure
  • 2
    The two-way Data Binding is awesome
  • 2
    Community
  • 2
    Typescript
  • 2
    Declarative programming
  • 2
    I do not touch DOM
  • 2
    Be a developer, not a plumber.
  • 2
    Dart
  • 1
    Fkin awesome
  • 1
    Scopes
  • 1
    The powerful of binding, routing and controlling routes
  • 1
    Supports api , easy development
  • 1
    Opinionated in the right areas
  • 1
    Amazing community support
  • 1
    Common Place
  • 1
    Very very useful and fast framework for development.
  • 1
    Great
  • 1
    Programming fun again
  • 1
    Readable code
  • 1
    Linear learning curve
CONS OF ANGULARJS
  • 10
    Complex
  • 3
    Dependency injection
  • 2
    Learning Curve
  • 2
    Event Listener Overload
  • 1
    Hard to learn

related AngularJS posts

Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 23 upvotes · 1.5M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 19 upvotes · 486.7K views

Our whole Vue.js frontend stack (incl. SSR) consists of the following tools:

  • Nuxt.js consisting of Vue CLI, Vue Router, vuex, Webpack and Sass (Bundler for HTML5, CSS 3), Babel (Transpiler for JavaScript),
  • Vue Styleguidist as our style guide and pool of developed Vue.js components
  • Vuetify as Material Component Framework (for fast app development)
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • Apollo / GraphQL (incl. GraphiQL) for data access layer (https://apollo.vuejs.org/)
  • ESLint, TSLint and Prettier for coding style and code analyzes
  • Jest as testing framework
  • Google Fonts and Font Awesome for typography and icon toolkit
  • NativeScript-Vue for mobile development

The main reason we have chosen Vue.js over React and AngularJS is related to the following artifacts:

  • Empowered HTML. Vue.js has many similar approaches with Angular. This helps to optimize HTML blocks handling with the use of different components.
  • Detailed documentation. Vue.js has very good documentation which can fasten learning curve for developers.
  • Adaptability. It provides a rapid switching period from other frameworks. It has similarities with Angular and React in terms of design and architecture.
  • Awesome integration. Vue.js can be used for both building single-page applications and more difficult web interfaces of apps. Smaller interactive parts can be easily integrated into the existing infrastructure with no negative effect on the entire system.
  • Large scaling. Vue.js can help to develop pretty large reusable templates.
  • Tiny size. Vue.js weights around 20KB keeping its speed and flexibility. It allows reaching much better performance in comparison to other frameworks.
See more
Svelte logo

Svelte

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331
A UI framework that compiles into tiny standalone JavaScript modules
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600
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331
PROS OF SVELTE
  • 33
    Performance
  • 27
    Reactivity
  • 26
    Javascript compiler (do that browsers don't have to)
  • 23
    Components
  • 21
    Real Reactivity
  • 21
    Lightweight
  • 20
    Simplicity
  • 19
    Fast as vanilajs
  • 17
    Near to no learning curve
  • 14
    Use existing js libraries
  • 14
    Compiler based
  • 13
    All in one
  • 12
    Scalable
  • 11
    Composable
  • 10
    Very easy for beginners
  • 10
    SSR
  • 9
    No runtime overhead
  • 8
    Ease of use
  • 7
    Built in store
  • 4
    Typescript
  • 4
    Templates
  • 4
    Best Developer Experience
  • 3
    Start with pure html + css
  • 1
    Speed
CONS OF SVELTE
  • 1
    Event Listener Overload
  • 1
    Hard to learn
  • 1
    Learning Curve
  • 1
    Complex

related Svelte posts

Sarmad Chaudhary
Founder & CEO at Ebiz Ltd. · | 8 upvotes · 159.7K views

Hi there!

I just want to have a simple poll/vote...

If you guys need a UI/Component Library for React, Vue.js, or AngularJS, which type of library would you prefer between:

1 ) A single maintained cross-framework library that is 100% compatible and can be integrated with any popular framework like Vue, React, Angular 2, Svelte, etc.

2) A native framework-specific library developed to work only on target framework like ElementUI for Vue, Ant Design for React.

Your advice would help a lot! Thanks in advance :)

See more
Blazor logo

Blazor

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319
108
An experimental web UI framework using C#/Razor and HTML, running in the browser via WebAssembly
195
319
+ 1
108
PROS OF BLAZOR
  • 20
    Uses C#
  • 15
    No need to learn separate language or technology
  • 14
    Supports making a single page application
  • 13
    Uses .NET standard library
  • 11
    Tight integration with .NET project
  • 8
    No need to compile, bundle and deploy separately
  • 6
    Very little JavaScript required
  • 5
    Shared classes between client and server
  • 4
    App state can be managed singleton objects
  • 4
    Third party state management i.e. Blazor-State
  • 3
    Components
  • 3
    Very easy JavaScript interop if required
  • 2
    Has Server AND Client hosting models
CONS OF BLAZOR
  • 2
    Initial load time
  • 1
    Hard to inject javascript

related Blazor posts

Vue.js logo

Vue.js

30.4K
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1.3K
A progressive framework for building user interfaces
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PROS OF VUE.JS
  • 258
    Simple and easy to start with
  • 204
    Good documentation
  • 176
    Components
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    Simple the best
  • 95
    Simplified AngularJS
  • 75
    Reactive
  • 65
    Intuitive APIs
  • 47
    Javascript
  • 41
    Changed my front end coding life
  • 36
    Configuration is smooth
  • 25
    Easy to learn
  • 20
    So much fun to use
  • 18
    Progressive
  • 16
    Virtual dom
  • 11
    Faster than bulldogs on hot tarmac
  • 8
    Best of Both Worlds
  • 8
    It's magic
  • 7
    Without misleading licenses
  • 7
    Application structure
  • 7
    Component is template, javascript and style in one
  • 7
    Elegant design
  • 7
    Perfomance
  • 6
    Intuitive and easy to use
  • 5
    Light Weight
  • 4
    Easy to integrate to HTML by inline-templates
  • 4
    Good command line interface
  • 3
    Like Angular only quicker to get started with
  • 3
    Small learning curve
  • 2
    Concise error messages
  • 2
    Logicless templates
  • 2
    Supports several template languages
  • 2
    High performance
  • 2
    Customer Render ending eg to HTML
  • 2
    One-way data flow
  • 2
    Single file components
  • 2
    Intuitive
  • 2
    Lots of documentation
  • 2
    Bridge from Web Development to JS Development
  • 2
    Component based
  • 1
    GUI
CONS OF VUE.JS
  • 4
    Less Common Place
  • 2
    YXMLvsHTML Markup
  • 1
    Don't support fragments
  • 1
    Only support programatically multiple root nodes

related Vue.js posts

Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 26 upvotes · 287.1K views
Shared insights
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

See more
Shared insights
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

I find using Vue.js to be easier (more concise / less boilerplate) and more intuitive than writing React. However, there are a lot more readily available React components that I can just plug into my projects. I'm debating whether to use Vue.js or React for an upcoming project that I'm going to use to help teach a friend how to build an interactive frontend. Which would you recommend I use?

See more
Backbone.js logo

Backbone.js

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2.2K
678
Give your JS App some Backbone with Models, Views, Collections, and Events
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678
PROS OF BACKBONE.JS
  • 136
    Javascript structure
  • 102
    Models
  • 98
    Simple
  • 77
    Restful
  • 59
    Easy api
  • 46
    Flexible
  • 45
    Open source
  • 44
    Fast to pick up
  • 34
    Events
  • 25
    JSON
  • 8
    OOP
  • 2
    Lightweight
  • 1
    Easy customizable
  • 1
    Collections
CONS OF BACKBONE.JS
  • 1
    Requires underscore.js

related Backbone.js posts

Dan Robinson

The front end for Heap begun to grow unwieldy. The original jQuery pieces became difficult to maintain and scale, and a decision was made to introduce Backbone.js, Marionette, and TypeScript. Ultimately this ended up being a “detour” in the search for a scalable and maintainable front-end solution. The system did allow for developers to reuse components efficiently, but adding features was a difficult process, and it eventually became a bottleneck in advancing the product.

Today, the Heap product consists primarily of a customer-facing dashboard powered by React, MobX, and TypeScript on the front end. We wrote our migration to React and MobX in detail last year here.

#JavascriptUiLibraries #Libraries #JavascriptMvcFrameworks #TemplatingLanguagesExtensions

See more
Marcos Iglesias
Sr. Software Engineer at Eventbrite · | 13 upvotes · 139K views

We are in the middle of a change of the stack on the front end. So we used Backbone.js with Marionette. Then we also created our own implementation of a Flux kind of flow. We call it eb-flux. We have worked with Marionette for a long time. Then at some point we start evolving and end up having a kind of Redux.js-style architecture, but with Marionette.

But then maybe one and a half years ago, we started moving into React and that's why we created the Eventbrite design system. It's a really nice project that probably could be open sourced. It's a library of components for our React components.

With the help of that library, we are building our new stack with React and sometimes Redux when it's necessary.

See more
Ember.js logo

Ember.js

1.1K
744
765
A JavaScript framework for creating ambitious web apps
1.1K
744
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765
PROS OF EMBER.JS
  • 124
    Elegant
  • 96
    Quick to develop
  • 82
    Great community
  • 81
    Great mvc
  • 72
    Great router
  • 51
    Values conventions, there is one-true way to organize
  • 49
    Open source
  • 44
    Components
  • 34
    Mvc framework
  • 28
    Handlebars.js
  • 13
    Htmlbars
  • 11
    Yehuda katz
  • 10
    Tom dale
  • 10
    Great logo
  • 5
    manages large data sets on the front end easily
  • 5
    Glimmer: react-like rendering engine
  • 5
    Convention over Configuration
  • 5
    It's NOT Google or Facebook
  • 4
    Enterprise
  • 4
    Fast
  • 4
    Intelligent
  • 4
    It rocks
  • 4
    Organized
  • 3
    IE8 support
  • 3
    Fastest spinning circles
  • 3
    Good docs
  • 2
    Documentation is finally active and updated
  • 2
    Easy and Quick to develop
  • 1
    Growing community
  • 1
    Flexibility
  • 1
    For building ambitious Web apps
  • 1
    Dependency Injection
  • 1
    Comprehensive
  • 1
    Business wins
  • 1
    Great for big apps/many devs because its organized
CONS OF EMBER.JS
  • 2
    Very little flexibility
  • 2
    Too much convention, too little configuration
  • 1
    Hard to integrate with Non Ruby apps
  • 1
    Hard to use if your API isn't RESTful

related Ember.js posts

Dmitry Mukhin

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

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Choosing a framework be it angular, react, ember or vue is personal preference. I would say start with each and build something that utilise state management (todo list perhaps?) and see which style you are comfortable with.

If you wants to get employed, React is a wiser choice. It also helps you build native mobile apps with react-native . If you are building enterprise app with alot of client-side data, nothing beats Ember.js ember-data.

If you are like me who is prototyping light-weight startup and would like to move fast and missing your first front-end learning (angular 1), go with Vue.js . NativeScript-Vue is the binding to build mobile native apps with it.

See more