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Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 20 upvotes · 87.8K views
Vue.js
Vue.js
React
React

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

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Łukasz Korecki
Łukasz Korecki
CTO & Co-founder at EnjoyHQ · | 12 upvotes · 113.5K views
atEnjoyHQEnjoyHQ
RethinkDB
RethinkDB
MongoDB
MongoDB
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL

We initially chose RethinkDB because of the schema-less document store features, and better durability resilience/story than MongoDB In the end, it didn't work out quite as we expected: there's plenty of scalability issues, it's near impossible to run analytical workloads and small community makes working with Rethink a challenge. We're in process of migrating all our workloads to PostgreSQL and hopefully, we will be able to decommission our RethinkDB deployment soon.

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Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 4 upvotes · 35.3K views
atZulipZulip
Codecov
Codecov
Coveralls
Coveralls

We use Codecov because it's a lot better than Coveralls. Both of them provide the useful feature of having nice web-accessible reports of which files have what level of test coverage (though every coverage tool produces reasonably nice HTML in a directory on the local filesystem), and can report on PRs cases where significant new code was added without test coverage.

That said, I'm pretty unhappy with both of them for our use case. The fundamental problem with both of them is that they don't handle the ~1% probability situations with missing data due to networking flakiness well. The reason I think our use case is relevant is that we submit coverage data from multiple jobs (one that runs our frontend test suite and another that runs our backend test suite), and the coverage provider is responsible for combining that data together.

I think the problem is if a test suite runs successfully but due to some operational/networking error between Travis/CircleCI and Codecov the coverage data for part of the codebase doesn't get submitted, Codecov will report a huge coverage drop in a way that is very confusing for our contributors (because they experience it as "why did the coverage drop 12%, all I did was added a test").

We migrated from Coveralls to Codecov because empirically this sort of breakage happened 10x less on Codecov, but it still happens way more often than I'd like.

I wish they put more effort in their retry mechanism and/or providing clearer debugging information (E.g. a big "Missing data" banner) so that one didn't need to be specifically told to ignore Codecov/Coveralls when it reports a giant coverage drop.

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Chris McFadden
Chris McFadden
VP, Engineering at SparkPost · | 5 upvotes · 33.1K views
atSparkPostSparkPost
Cassandra
Cassandra
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon RDS for Aurora

We migrated most of our APIs last year from using our self managed Cassandra cluster to a mix of Amazon DynamoDB and Amazon RDS for Aurora. This has reduced the operational overhead for our team and greatly improved the overall reliability of our service. The new dynamic capacity in DynamoDB has been super helpful for handling bursty traffic.

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Go
Go
Python
Python
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
NATS
NATS
Docker
Docker
Git
Git

Go is a high performance language with simple syntax / semantics. Although it is not as expressive as some other languages, it's still a great language for backend development.

Python is expressive and battery-included, and pre-installed in most linux distros, making it a great language for scripting.

PostgreSQL: Rock-solid RDBMS with NoSQL support.

TypeScript saves you from all nonsense semantics of JavaScript , LOL.

NATS: fast message queue and easy to deploy / maintain.

Docker makes deployment painless.

Git essential tool for collaboration and source management.

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