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Ajit Parthan
Ajit Parthan
CTO at Shaw Academy · | 3 upvotes · 4.2K views
atShaw Academy
Python
PHP
#Etl

Multiple systems means there is a requirement to cart data across them.

Started off with Talend scripts. This was great as what we initially had were PHP/Python script - allowed for a more systematic approach to ETL.

But ended up with a massive repository of scripts, complex crontab entries and regular failures due to memory issues.

Using Stitch or similar services is a better approach: - no need to worry about the infrastructure needed for the ETL processes - a more formal mapping of data from source to destination as opposed to script developer doing his/her voodoo magic - lot of common sources and destination integrations are already builtin and out of the box

etl @{etlasaservice}|topic:1323|

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Kestas Barzdaitis
Kestas Barzdaitis
Entrepreneur & Engineer · | 10 upvotes · 19.6K views
atCodeFactor
Google Cloud Functions
Azure Functions
AWS Lambda
Docker
Google Compute Engine
Microsoft Azure
Amazon EC2
CodeFactor.io
Kubernetes
#Devops
#AI
#Machinelearning
#Automation
#Startup
#Autoscale
#Containerization
#IAAS
#SAAS

CodeFactor being a #SAAS product, our goal was to run on a cloud-native infrastructure since day one. We wanted to stay product focused, rather than having to work on the infrastructure that supports the application. We needed a cloud-hosting provider that would be reliable, economical and most efficient for our product.

CodeFactor.io aims to provide an automated and frictionless code review service for software developers. That requires agility, instant provisioning, autoscaling, security, availability and compliance management features. We looked at the top three #IAAS providers that take up the majority of market share: Amazon's Amazon EC2 , Microsoft's Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

AWS has been available since 2006 and has developed the most extensive services ant tools variety at a massive scale. Azure and GCP are about half the AWS age, but also satisfied our technical requirements.

It is worth noting that even though all three providers support Docker containerization services, GCP has the most robust offering due to their investments in Kubernetes. Also, if you are a Microsoft shop, and develop in .NET - Visual Studio Azure shines at integration there and all your existing .NET code works seamlessly on Azure. All three providers have serverless computing offerings (AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions). Additionally, all three providers have machine learning tools, but GCP appears to be the most developer-friendly, intuitive and complete when it comes to #Machinelearning and #AI.

The prices between providers are competitive across the board. For our requirements, AWS would have been the most expensive, GCP the least expensive and Azure was in the middle. Plus, if you #Autoscale frequently with large deltas, note that Azure and GCP have per minute billing, where AWS bills you per hour. We also applied for the #Startup programs with all three providers, and this is where Azure shined. While AWS and GCP for startups would have covered us for about one year of infrastructure costs, Azure Sponsorship would cover about two years of CodeFactor's hosting costs. Moreover, Azure Team was terrific - I felt that they wanted to work with us where for AWS and GCP we were just another startup.

In summary, we were leaning towards GCP. GCP's advantages in containerization, automation toolset, #Devops mindset, and pricing were the driving factors there. Nevertheless, we could not say no to Azure's financial incentives and a strong sense of partnership and support throughout the process.

Bottom line is, IAAS offerings with AWS, Azure, and GCP are evolving fast. At CodeFactor, we aim to be platform agnostic where it is practical and retain the flexibility to cherry-pick the best products across providers.

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 16 upvotes · 26.3K views
atChecklyHQ
vuex
Knex.js
PostgreSQL
Amazon S3
AWS Lambda
Vue.js
hapi
Node.js
GitHub
Docker
Heroku

Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

  • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
  • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
  • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
  • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
  • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

  1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
  2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
  3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
  4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

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Lars Lockefeer
Lars Lockefeer
Mobile Tech Lead at Picnic · | 2 upvotes · 3.3K views
atPicnic
Prettier
Jest
React Storybook
styled-components
CodePush
RxJS
Redux.js
TypeScript
React Native

Earlier this year, we started developing a new app to help our runners deliver groceries to our customers. We chose React Native over a native app or a PWA and are really happy with it. So far, we really like what we are seeing. Development speed is fast and the tooling is awesome. The “learn once, write anywhere”-promise is really fulfilled and when we ran our project for the first time on iOS after a few weeks of development, we were excited to see how well it worked and what it looked like.

Read our blog post to learn more about how we use React Native, TypeScript, Redux.js, RxJS, CodePush, styled-components, React Storybook, Jest, and Prettier to develop this app, as well as our thought of what else we will do with it at Picnic.

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 13 upvotes · 41.9K views
atDev As Pros
Trello
Slack
Keen
Bootstrap
Create React App
React
Google Maps

For Etom, a side project. We wanted to test an idea for a future and bigger project.

What Etom does is searching places. Right now, it leverages the Google Maps API. For that, we found a React component that makes this integration easy because using Google Maps API is not possible via normal API requests.

You kind of need a map to work as a proxy between the software and Google Maps API.

We hate configuration(coming from Rails world) so also decided to use Create React App because setting up a React app, with all the toys, it's a hard job.

Thanks to all the people behind Create React App it's easier to start any React application.

We also chose a module called Reactstrap which is Bootstrap UI in React components.

An important thing in this side project(and in the bigger project plan) is to measure visitor through out the app. For that we researched and found that Keen was a good choice(very good free tier limits) and also it is very simple to setup and real simple to send data to

Slack and Trello are our defaults tools to comunicate ideas and discuss topics, so, no brainer using them as well for this project.

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