28.7K
20.5K
+ 1
3.4K

What is React?

Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
React is a tool in the Javascript UI Libraries category of a tech stack.
React is an open source tool with 140.5K GitHub stars and 26.8K GitHub forks. Here鈥檚 a link to React's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses React?

Companies
7937 companies reportedly use React in their tech stacks, including Airbnb, Uber, and Facebook.

Developers
19053 developers on StackShare have stated that they use React.

React Integrations

Firebase, Sentry, Bugsnag, Grails, and Socket.IO are some of the popular tools that integrate with React. Here's a list of all 188 tools that integrate with React.

Why developers like React?

Here鈥檚 a list of reasons why companies and developers use React
React Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose React in their tech stack.

Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare | 41 upvotes 213.7K views
Firebase
Firebase
React
React
Redux
Redux
styled-components
styled-components
Netlify
Netlify
Gatsby
Gatsby
GitHub
GitHub
#ReactRally
#Frontend
#Google

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

See more
Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times | 27 upvotes 381.1K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
MySQL
MySQL
PHP
PHP
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
GraphQL
GraphQL
Node.js
Node.js
Kafka
Kafka
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

See more
Vaibhav Taunk
Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert | 26 upvotes 97.7K views
.NET Core
.NET Core
Angular CLI
Angular CLI
React
React
MongoDB
MongoDB
Flutter
Flutter
React Native
React Native
Postman
Postman
Markdown
Markdown
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Zach Holman
Zach Holman
at Zach Holman | 24 upvotes 214.1K views
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
Rails
Rails
JavaScript
JavaScript

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

See more
Dmitry Mukhin
Dmitry Mukhin
at Uploadcare | 22 upvotes 241.9K views
atUploadcareUploadcare
Django
Django
Python
Python
React
React
Ember.js
Ember.js
Preact
Preact
PostCSS
PostCSS

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It鈥檚 worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren鈥檛 running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we鈥檇 go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

See more
Greg SwissDev
Greg SwissDev
Founder at SwissDev Jobs | 20 upvotes 50.3K views
atSwissDev JobsSwissDev Jobs
Node.js
Node.js
React
React
MongoDB
MongoDB

When building https://swissdevjobs.ch in 2018 we decided to go with a very simple stack with Node.js React and MongoDB. The decision was mostly because we already had experience with this stack and needed something to build a quick prototype.

Fast forward 1 year and in August 2019 we have over 12'000 monthly users and survived the traffic spikes from Hacker News and Product Hunt. It also proved to be very suited well for easy deployments and adding new features, including a public API.

See more

React Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to React?
Angular 2
It is a TypeScript-based open-source web application framework. It is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications.
Vue.js
It is a library for building interactive web interfaces. It provides data-reactive components with a simple and flexible API.
Ember.js
A JavaScript framework that does all of the heavy lifting that you'd normally have to do by hand. There are tasks that are common to every web app; It does those things for you, so you can focus on building killer features and UI.
NativeScript
NativeScript enables developers to build native apps for iOS, Android and Windows Universal while sharing the application code across the platforms. When building the application UI, developers use our libraries, which abstract the differences between the native platforms.
jQuery
jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML.
See all alternatives

React's Followers
20463 developers follow React to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
Phil S
Jim Park
diego-cc
David Berry
Parada Susuk
Wagner Lopes
Fl谩vio Tassan
archonic
jeremie olivier
Wahid Alimi