What is React?

Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project.
React is a tool in the Javascript UI Libraries category of a tech stack.
React is an open source tool with 146.3K GitHub stars and 28.2K GitHub forks. Here鈥檚 a link to React's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses React?

Companies
8283 companies reportedly use React in their tech stacks, including Airbnb, Uber, and Facebook.

Developers
33503 developers on StackShare have stated that they use React.

React Integrations

Font Awesome, Firebase, Redux, Sentry, and WebStorm are some of the popular tools that integrate with React. Here's a list of all 207 tools that integrate with React.

Why developers like React?

Here鈥檚 a list of reasons why companies and developers use React
Private Decisions at about React
Private to your company

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by members of with React in their tech stack.

React
React
Redux
Redux
FeathersJS
FeathersJS
HTML5
HTML5
JavaScript
JavaScript
MongoDB
MongoDB
Redis
Redis
Socket.IO
Socket.IO
ES6
ES6

I have always been interested in building a real-time multiplayer game engine that could be massively scalable, and recently I decided to start working on a MMO version of the classic "snake" game. I wanted the entire #Stack to be based on ES6 JavaScript so for the #Backend I chose to use FeathersJS with MongoDB for game/user data storage, Redis for distributed mutex and pub/sub, and Socket.IO for real-time communication. For the #Frontend I used React with Redux.js, the FeathersJS client as well as HTML5 canvas to render the view.

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Adebayo Akinlaja
Adebayo Akinlaja
Engineering Manager at Andela | 13 upvotes 179.9K views
React
React
Material-UI
Material-UI
Evergreen
Evergreen
TypeScript
TypeScript
Material Kit
Material Kit
Create React App
Create React App
Bit
Bit

I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen鈥攕ince I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

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React
React

I use React because of it's eco system. If you know React, you already know around 65% of React Native. Also, you can find countless open source packages/components which enables rapid prototyping/development.

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Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare | 58 upvotes 569.3K views
Firebase
Firebase
React
React
Redux
Redux
styled-components
styled-components
Netlify
Netlify
Gatsby
Gatsby
GitHub
GitHub
#ReactRally
#Frontend
#Google

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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Rails
Rails
Sidekiq
Sidekiq
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Redis
Redis
MongoDB
MongoDB
Vue.js
Vue.js
vuex
vuex
jQuery
jQuery
React
React
Redux
Redux
Yarn
Yarn
#Bulma.io
#Font-awesome

I'm building a new process management tool. I decided to build with Rails as my backend, using Sidekiq for background jobs. I chose to work with these tools because I've worked with them before and know that they're able to get the job done. They may not be the sexiest tools, but they work and are reliable, which is what I was optimizing for. For data stores, I opted for PostgreSQL and Redis. Because I'm planning on offering dashboards, I wanted a SQL database instead of something like MongoDB that might work early on, but be difficult to use as soon as I want to facilitate aggregate queries.

On the front-end I'm using Vue.js and vuex in combination with #Turbolinks. In effect, I want to render most pages on the server side without key interactions being managed by Vue.js . This is the first project I'm working on where I've explicitly decided not to include jQuery . I have found React and Redux.js more confusing to setup. I appreciate the opinionated approach from the Vue.js community and that things just work together the way that I'd expect. To manage my javascript dependencies, I'm using Yarn .

For CSS frameworks, I'm using #Bulma.io. I really appreciate it's minimal nature and that there are no hard javascript dependencies. And to add a little spice, I'm using #font-awesome.

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Glenn 'devalias' Grant
Glenn 'devalias' Grant
Hack. Dev. Transcend. | 5 upvotes 37.8K views
React
React
Redux
Redux
redux-saga
redux-saga
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Go
Go
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
AWS CloudFormation
AWS CloudFormation
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
WebStorm
WebStorm
Git
Git
GitLab
GitLab
#Serverless
#JetBrains

Working on a project recently, wanted an easy modern frontend to work with, decoupled from our backend. To get things going quickly, decided to go with React, Redux.js, redux-saga, Bootstrap.

On the backend side, Go is a personal favourite, and wanted to minimize server overheads so went with a #serverless architecture leveraging AWS Lambda, AWS CloudFormation, Amazon DynamoDB, etc.

For IDE/tooling I tend to stick to the #JetBrains tools: WebStorm / Goland.

Obviously using Git, with GitLab private repo's for managing code/issues/etc.

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Public Decisions about React

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose React in their tech stack.

Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare | 58 upvotes 569.3K views
Firebase
Firebase
React
React
Redux
Redux
styled-components
styled-components
Netlify
Netlify
Gatsby
Gatsby
GitHub
GitHub
#ReactRally
#Frontend
#Google

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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Zach Holman
Zach Holman
at Zach Holman | 40 upvotes 438K views
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
Rails
Rails
JavaScript
JavaScript

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times | 30 upvotes 893K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
MySQL
MySQL
PHP
PHP
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
GraphQL
GraphQL
Node.js
Node.js
Kafka
Kafka
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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Vaibhav Taunk
Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert | 29 upvotes 603.1K views
.NET Core
.NET Core
Angular CLI
Angular CLI
React
React
MongoDB
MongoDB
Flutter
Flutter
React Native
React Native
Postman
Postman
Markdown
Markdown
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

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James Man
James Man
Software Engineer at Pinterest | 29 upvotes 210.2K views
Flask
Flask
React
React

One of our top priorities at Pinterest is fostering a safe and trustworthy experience for all Pinners. As Pinterest鈥檚 user base and ads business grow, the review volume has been increasing exponentially, and more content types require moderation support. To solve greater engineering and operational challenges at scale, we needed a highly-reliable and performant system to detect, report, evaluate, and act on abusive content and users and so we created Pinqueue.

Pinqueue-3.0 serves as a generic platform for content moderation and human labeling. Under the hood, Pinqueue3.0 is a Flask + React app powered by Pinterest鈥檚 very own Gestalt UI framework. On the backend, Pinqueue3.0 heavily relies on PinLater, a Pinterest-built reliable asynchronous job execution system, to handle the requests for enqueueing and action-taking. Using PinLater has significantly strengthened Pinqueue3.0鈥檚 overall infra with its capability of processing a massive load of events with configurable retry policies.

Hundreds of millions of people around the world use Pinterest to discover and do what they love, and our job is to protect them from abusive and harmful content. We鈥檙e committed to providing an inspirational yet safe experience to all Pinners. Solving trust & safety problems is a joint effort requiring expertise across multiple domains. Pinqueue3.0 not only plays a critical role in responsively taking down unsafe content, it also has become an enabler for future ML/automation initiatives by providing high-quality human labels. Going forward, we will continue to improve the review experience, measure review quality and collaborate with our machine learning teams to solve content moderation beyond manual reviews at an even larger scale.

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Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare | 27 upvotes 765K views
atStackShareStackShare
React
React
Glamorous
Glamorous
Apollo
Apollo
Node.js
Node.js
Rails
Rails
Heroku
Heroku
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Webpack
Webpack
CircleCI
CircleCI
Redis
Redis
#StackDecisionsLaunch
#SSR
#Microservices
#FrontEndRepoSplit

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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React Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to React?
Angular 2
It is a TypeScript-based open-source web application framework. It is a development platform for building mobile and desktop web applications.
Vue.js
It is a library for building interactive web interfaces. It provides data-reactive components with a simple and flexible API.
Ember.js
A JavaScript framework that does all of the heavy lifting that you'd normally have to do by hand. There are tasks that are common to every web app; It does those things for you, so you can focus on building killer features and UI.
NativeScript
NativeScript enables developers to build native apps for iOS, Android and Windows Universal while sharing the application code across the platforms. When building the application UI, developers use our libraries, which abstract the differences between the native platforms.
jQuery
jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML.
See all alternatives

React's Followers
35231 developers follow React to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
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