Alternatives to Erlang logo

Alternatives to Erlang

Elixir, Haskell, Go, Clojure, and Akka are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Erlang.
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What is Erlang and what are its top alternatives?

Some of Erlang's uses are in telecoms, banking, e-commerce, computer telephony and instant messaging. Erlang's runtime system has built-in support for concurrency, distribution and fault tolerance. OTP is set of Erlang libraries and design principles providing middle-ware to develop these systems.
Erlang is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.
Erlang is an open source tool with 9.6K GitHub stars and 2.7K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Erlang's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Erlang

  • Elixir

    Elixir

    Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain. ...

  • Haskell

    Haskell

    It is a general purpose language that can be used in any domain and use case, it is ideally suited for proprietary business logic and data analysis, fast prototyping and enhancing existing software environments with correct code, performance and scalability. ...

  • Go

    Go

    Go is expressive, concise, clean, and efficient. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel type system enables flexible and modular program construction. Go compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. It's a fast, statically typed, compiled language that feels like a dynamically typed, interpreted language. ...

  • Clojure

    Clojure

    Clojure is designed to be a general-purpose language, combining the approachability and interactive development of a scripting language with an efficient and robust infrastructure for multithreaded programming. Clojure is a compiled language - it compiles directly to JVM bytecode, yet remains completely dynamic. Clojure is a dialect of Lisp, and shares with Lisp the code-as-data philosophy and a powerful macro system. ...

  • Akka

    Akka

    Akka is a toolkit and runtime for building highly concurrent, distributed, and resilient message-driven applications on the JVM. ...

  • OCaml

    OCaml

    It is an industrial strength programming language supporting functional, imperative and object-oriented styles. It is the technology of choice in companies where a single mistake can cost millions and speed matters, ...

  • Rust

    Rust

    Rust is a systems programming language that combines strong compile-time correctness guarantees with fast performance. It improves upon the ideas of other systems languages like C++ by providing guaranteed memory safety (no crashes, no data races) and complete control over the lifecycle of memory. ...

  • Java

    Java

    Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere! ...

Erlang alternatives & related posts

Elixir logo

Elixir

2.8K
2.8K
1.3K
Dynamic, functional language designed for building scalable and maintainable applications
2.8K
2.8K
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PROS OF ELIXIR
  • 166
    Concurrency
  • 152
    Functional
  • 129
    Erlang vm
  • 110
    Great documentation
  • 103
    Great tooling
  • 83
    Immutable data structures
  • 78
    Open source
  • 75
    Pattern-matching
  • 61
    Easy to get started
  • 58
    Actor library
  • 28
    Ruby inspired
  • 28
    Functional with a neat syntax
  • 24
    Homoiconic
  • 23
    Erlang evolved
  • 21
    Beauty of Ruby, Speed of Erlang/C
  • 17
    Fault Tolerant
  • 13
    Simple
  • 13
    High Performance
  • 10
    Good lang
  • 9
    Doc as first class citizen
  • 9
    Stinkin' fast, no memory leaks, easy on the eyes
  • 9
    Pipe Operator
  • 7
    Resilient to failure
  • 6
    Fun to write
  • 5
    OTP
  • 5
    GenServer takes the guesswork out of background work
  • 4
    Idempotence
  • 4
    Not Swift
  • 4
    Pattern matching
  • 4
    Fast, Concurrent with clean error messages
  • 2
    Error isolation
  • 1
    Dynamic Typing
CONS OF ELIXIR
  • 11
    Fewer jobs for Elixir experts
  • 7
    Smaller userbase than other mainstream languages
  • 5
    Elixir's dot notation less readable ("object": 1st arg)
  • 4
    Dynamic typing
  • 1
    Difficult to understand
  • 1
    Not a lot of learning books available

related Elixir posts

Kamil Kowalski
Lead Architect at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 1.2M views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

See more
Sebastian Gębski

Another major decision was to adopt Elixir and Phoenix Framework - the DX (Developer eXperience) is pretty similar to what we know from RoR, but this tech is running on the top of rock-solid Erlang platform which is powering planet-scale telecom solutions for 20+ years. So we're getting pretty much the best from both worlds: minimum friction & smart conventions that eliminate the excessive boilerplate AND highly concurrent EVM (Erlang's Virtual Machine) that makes all the scalability problems vanish. The transition was very smooth - none of Ruby developers we had decided to leave because of Elixir. What is more, we kept recruiting Ruby developers w/o any requirement regarding Elixir proficiency & we still were able to educate them internally in almost no time. Obviously Elixir comes with some more tools in the stack: Credo , Hex , AppSignal (required to properly monitor BEAM apps).

See more
Haskell logo

Haskell

1K
1K
493
An advanced purely-functional programming language
1K
1K
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493
PROS OF HASKELL
  • 85
    Purely-functional programming
  • 65
    Statically typed
  • 57
    Type-safe
  • 38
    Open source
  • 38
    Great community
  • 29
    Built-in concurrency
  • 29
    Composable
  • 28
    Built-in parallelism
  • 22
    Referentially transparent
  • 19
    Generics
  • 14
    Intellectual satisfaction
  • 13
    Type inference
  • 11
    If it compiles, it's correct
  • 7
    Monads
  • 7
    Flexible
  • 4
    Great type system
  • 4
    Proposition testing with QuickCheck
  • 3
    One of the most powerful languages *(see blub paradox)*
  • 2
    Fun
  • 2
    Kind system
  • 2
    Reliable
  • 2
    Highly expressive, type-safe, fast development time
  • 2
    Type classes
  • 2
    Better type-safe than sorry
  • 2
    Pattern matching and completeness checking
  • 2
    Purely-functional Programming
  • 2
    Best in class thinking tool
  • 2
    Great maintainability of the code
  • 0
    Orthogonality
  • 0
    Predictable
CONS OF HASKELL
  • 7
    Too much distraction in language extensions
  • 6
    Error messages can be very confusing
  • 4
    Libraries have poor documentation
  • 3
    No best practices
  • 3
    No good ABI
  • 2
    Sometimes performance is unpredictable
  • 2
    Poor packaging for apps written in it for Linux distros
  • 1
    Slow compilation

related Haskell posts

Vadim Bakaev
Shared insights
on
HaskellHaskellScalaScala

Why I am using Haskell in my free time?

I have 3 reasons for it. I am looking for:

Fun.

Improve functional programming skill.

Improve problem-solving skill.

Laziness and mathematical abstractions behind Haskell makes it a wonderful language.

It is Pure functional, it helps me to write better Scala code.

Highly expressive language gives elegant ways to solve coding puzzle.

See more
Go logo

Go

13.5K
11.6K
3.1K
An open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software
13.5K
11.6K
+ 1
3.1K
PROS OF GO
  • 528
    High-performance
  • 385
    Simple, minimal syntax
  • 352
    Fun to write
  • 293
    Easy concurrency support via goroutines
  • 265
    Fast compilation times
  • 186
    Goroutines
  • 176
    Statically linked binaries that are simple to deploy
  • 146
    Simple compile build/run procedures
  • 132
    Backed by google
  • 129
    Great community
  • 48
    Garbage collection built-in
  • 40
    Built-in Testing
  • 39
    Excellent tools - gofmt, godoc etc
  • 36
    Elegant and concise like Python, fast like C
  • 32
    Awesome to Develop
  • 24
    Used for Docker
  • 23
    Flexible interface system
  • 21
    Great concurrency pattern
  • 21
    Deploy as executable
  • 18
    Open-source Integration
  • 15
    Fun to write and so many feature out of the box
  • 14
    Easy to read
  • 13
    Its Simple and Heavy duty
  • 13
    Go is God
  • 12
    Powerful and simple
  • 12
    Easy to deploy
  • 10
    Concurrency
  • 10
    Best language for concurrency
  • 9
    Safe GOTOs
  • 9
    Rich standard library
  • 8
    Easy setup
  • 8
    Clean code, high performance
  • 7
    Simplicity, Concurrency, Performance
  • 7
    Hassle free deployment
  • 7
    High performance
  • 6
    Single binary avoids library dependency issues
  • 6
    Used by Giants of the industry
  • 5
    Simple, powerful, and great performance
  • 5
    Cross compiling
  • 4
    Garbage Collection
  • 4
    Excellent tooling
  • 4
    Very sophisticated syntax
  • 4
    Gofmt
  • 4
    WYSIWYG
  • 3
    Kubernetes written on Go
  • 3
    Widely used
  • 2
    Keep it simple and stupid
  • 0
    No generics
  • 0
    Operator goto
CONS OF GO
  • 41
    You waste time in plumbing code catching errors
  • 25
    Verbose
  • 22
    Packages and their path dependencies are braindead
  • 15
    Dependency management when working on multiple projects
  • 14
    Google's documentations aren't beginer friendly
  • 10
    Automatic garbage collection overheads
  • 8
    Uncommon syntax
  • 6
    Type system is lacking (no generics, etc)
  • 2
    Collection framework is lacking (list, set, map)

related Go posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 39 upvotes · 4.4M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

See more
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 1.5M views

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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Clojure logo

Clojure

1.3K
1.2K
1.1K
A dynamic programming language that targets the Java Virtual Machine
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PROS OF CLOJURE
  • 116
    It is a lisp
  • 99
    Persistent data structures
  • 98
    Concise syntax
  • 88
    jvm-based language
  • 87
    Concurrency
  • 80
    Interactive repl
  • 75
    Code is data
  • 61
    Open source
  • 58
    Lazy data structures
  • 54
    Macros
  • 47
    Functional
  • 22
    Simplistic
  • 21
    Immutable by default
  • 19
    Excellent collections
  • 18
    Fast-growing community
  • 14
    Multiple host languages
  • 14
    Simple (not easy!)
  • 13
    Practical Lisp
  • 9
    Because it's really fun to use
  • 9
    Addictive
  • 9
    Community
  • 8
    It creates Reusable code
  • 8
    Web friendly
  • 8
    Rapid development
  • 7
    Minimalist
  • 5
    Java interop
  • 5
    Programmable programming language
  • 4
    Regained interest in programming
  • 3
    Compiles to JavaScript
  • 3
    EDN
  • 2
    Share a lot of code with clojurescript/use on frontend
CONS OF CLOJURE
  • 9
    Cryptic stacktraces
  • 4
    Need to wrap basically every java lib
  • 3
    LISP!!!!!!!!
  • 3
    Good code heavily relies on local conventions
  • 3
    Toxic community
  • 2
    Slow application startup
  • 2
    Tonns of abandonware
  • 1
    Usable only with REPL
  • 1
    Hiring issues
  • 1
    Bad documented libs
  • 1
    Macros are overused by devs
  • 1
    Tricky profiling
  • 1
    IDE with high learning curve
  • 1
    Configuration bolierplate
  • 1
    Conservative community
  • 0
    Have no good and fast fmt

related Clojure posts

Stitch is run entirely on AWS. All of our transactional databases are run with Amazon RDS, and we rely on Amazon S3 for data persistence in various stages of our pipeline. Our product integrates with Amazon Redshift as a data destination, and we also use Redshift as an internal data warehouse (powered by Stitch, of course).

The majority of our services run on stateless Amazon EC2 instances that are managed by AWS OpsWorks. We recently introduced Kubernetes into our infrastructure to run the scheduled jobs that execute Singer code to extract data from various sources. Although we tend to be wary of shiny new toys, Kubernetes has proven to be a good fit for this problem, and its stability, strong community and helpful tooling have made it easy for us to incorporate into our operations.

While we continue to be happy with Clojure for our internal services, we felt that its relatively narrow adoption could impede Singer's growth. We chose Python both because it is well suited to the task, and it seems to have reached critical mass among data engineers. All that being said, the Singer spec is language agnostic, and integrations and libraries have been developed in JavaScript, Go, and Clojure.

See more

I adopted Clojure and ClojureScript because:

  • it's 1 language, multiple platforms.
  • Simple syntax.
  • Designed to avoid unwanted side effects and bugs.
  • Immutable data-structures.
  • Compact code, very expressive.
  • Source code is data.
  • It has super-flexible macro.
  • Has metadata.
  • Interoperability with JavaScript, Java and C#.
See more
Akka logo

Akka

807
843
85
Build powerful concurrent & distributed applications more easily
807
843
+ 1
85
PROS OF AKKA
  • 31
    Great concurrency model
  • 16
    Fast
  • 11
    Actor Library
  • 10
    Open source
  • 7
    Resilient
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 5
    Message driven
CONS OF AKKA
  • 3
    Mixing futures with Akka tell is difficult
  • 2
    Closing of futures
  • 2
    No type safety
  • 1
    Typed actors still not stable
  • 0
    Very difficult to refactor

related Akka posts

To solve the problem of scheduling and executing arbitrary tasks in its distributed infrastructure, PagerDuty created an open-source tool called Scheduler. Scheduler is written in Scala and uses Cassandra for task persistence. It also adds Apache Kafka to handle task queuing and partitioning, with Akka to structure the library’s concurrency.

The service’s logic schedules a task by passing it to the Scheduler’s Scala API, which serializes the task metadata and enqueues it into Kafka. Scheduler then consumes the tasks, and posts them to Cassandra to prevent data loss.

See more
Shared insights
on
AkkaAkkaKafkaKafka

I decided to use Akka instead of Kafka streams because I have personal relationships at @Lightbend.

See more
OCaml logo

OCaml

147
117
21
A general purpose industrial-strength programming language
147
117
+ 1
21
PROS OF OCAML
  • 5
    Satisfying to write
  • 4
    Pattern matching
  • 3
    Also has OOP
  • 3
    Easy syntax
  • 3
    Very practical
  • 3
    Extremely powerful type inference
CONS OF OCAML
  • 3
    Small community
  • 1
    Royal pain in the neck to compile large programs

related OCaml posts

Rust logo

Rust

3K
3.3K
1.1K
A safe, concurrent, practical language
3K
3.3K
+ 1
1.1K
PROS OF RUST
  • 131
    Guaranteed memory safety
  • 118
    Fast
  • 76
    Open source
  • 72
    Minimal runtime
  • 65
    Pattern matching
  • 58
    Type inference
  • 53
    Algebraic data types
  • 50
    Concurrent
  • 44
    Efficient C bindings
  • 41
    Practical
  • 34
    Best advances in languages in 20 years
  • 27
    Fix for C/C++
  • 26
    Safe, fast, easy + friendly community
  • 20
    Stablity
  • 20
    Closures
  • 18
    Zero-cost abstractions
  • 16
    Extensive compiler checks
  • 16
    Great community
  • 13
    No NULL type
  • 12
    No Garbage Collection
  • 12
    Completely cross platform: Windows, Linux, Android
  • 11
    Async/await
  • 10
    Super fast
  • 10
    High-performance
  • 10
    Great documentations
  • 9
    Safety no runtime crashes
  • 9
    High performance
  • 8
    Generics
  • 8
    Fearless concurrency
  • 8
    Guaranteed thread data race safety
  • 7
    Helpful compiler
  • 7
    Easy Deployment
  • 7
    Compiler can generate Webassembly
  • 7
    Prevents data races
  • 6
    RLS provides great IDE support
  • 6
    Painless dependency management
  • 6
    Macros
  • 4
    Real multithreading
  • 3
    Support on Other Languages
  • 3
    Good package management
CONS OF RUST
  • 24
    Hard to learn
  • 22
    Ownership learning curve
  • 8
    Unfriendly, verbose syntax
  • 3
    Many type operations make it difficult to follow
  • 3
    High size of builded executable
  • 3
    Variable shadowing
  • 2
    No jobs

related Rust posts

James Cunningham
Operations Engineer at Sentry · | 18 upvotes · 113.1K views
Shared insights
on
PythonPythonRustRust
at

Sentry's event processing pipeline, which is responsible for handling all of the ingested event data that makes it through to our offline task processing, is written primarily in Python.

For particularly intense code paths, like our source map processing pipeline, we have begun re-writing those bits in Rust. Rust’s lack of garbage collection makes it a particularly convenient language for embedding in Python. It allows us to easily build a Python extension where all memory is managed from the Python side (if the Python wrapper gets collected by the Python GC we clean up the Rust object as well).

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Jakub Olan
Node.js Software Engineer · | 17 upvotes · 268.3K views

In our company we have think a lot about languages that we're willing to use, there we have considering Java, Python and C++ . All of there languages are old and well developed at fact but that's not ideology of araclx. We've choose a edge technologies such as Node.js , Rust , Kotlin and Go as our programming languages which is some kind of fun. Node.js is one of biggest trends of 2019, same for Go. We want to grow in our company with growth of languages we have choose, and probably when we would choose Java that would be almost impossible because larger languages move on today's market slower, and cannot have big changes.

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Java logo

Java

92.8K
70.4K
3.6K
A concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, language specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible
92.8K
70.4K
+ 1
3.6K
PROS OF JAVA
  • 584
    Great libraries
  • 440
    Widely used
  • 399
    Excellent tooling
  • 386
    Huge amount of documentation available
  • 331
    Large pool of developers available
  • 203
    Open source
  • 200
    Excellent performance
  • 155
    Great development
  • 149
    Vast array of 3rd party libraries
  • 147
    Used for android
  • 60
    Compiled Language
  • 49
    Used for Web
  • 46
    Managed memory
  • 45
    High Performance
  • 44
    Native threads
  • 42
    Statically typed
  • 35
    Easy to read
  • 33
    Great Community
  • 29
    Reliable platform
  • 24
    JVM compatibility
  • 24
    Sturdy garbage collection
  • 21
    Cross Platform Enterprise Integration
  • 20
    Universal platform
  • 20
    Good amount of APIs
  • 18
    Great Support
  • 13
    Great ecosystem
  • 11
    Lots of boilerplate
  • 11
    Backward compatible
  • 10
    Everywhere
  • 9
    Excellent SDK - JDK
  • 7
    Static typing
  • 6
    Cross-platform
  • 6
    Long term language
  • 6
    Better than Ruby
  • 6
    Portability
  • 6
    It's Java
  • 6
    Mature language thus stable systems
  • 5
    Clojure
  • 5
    Used for Android development
  • 5
    Vast Collections Library
  • 4
    Old tech
  • 4
    Most developers favorite
  • 3
    Great Structure
  • 3
    History
  • 3
    Javadoc
  • 3
    Testable
  • 3
    Stable platform, which many new languages depend on
  • 3
    Best martial for design
  • 2
    Faster than python
CONS OF JAVA
  • 30
    Verbosity
  • 25
    NullpointerException
  • 16
    Overcomplexity is praised in community culture
  • 14
    Nightmare to Write
  • 11
    Boiler plate code
  • 8
    Classpath hell prior to Java 9
  • 6
    No REPL
  • 4
    No property
  • 2
    Non-intuitive generic implementation
  • 2
    There is not optional parameter
  • 2
    Code are too long
  • 2
    Floating-point errors
  • 1
    Returning Wildcard Types
  • 1
    Java's too statically, stronglly, and strictly typed
  • 1
    Terrbible compared to Python/Batch Perormence

related Java posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 39 upvotes · 4.4M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

See more
Kamil Kowalski
Lead Architect at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 1.2M views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

See more