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As an advanced user, I prefer Postgres over MySQL. MySQL was the first database I learned from my institute. I always have to undergo that infamous date and time dilemma many Java devs know. Both are adequate for a small project. When I worked on a project with a date and time-intensive data, I spent a lot of time dealing with the conversion and transition, leaving me frustrated. I tried Postgres to see how well it can perform. To my surprise, all became a breeze, and the transactions were faster too. I've been using Postgres ever since, and no more dilemma.

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7 upvotes2 comments1.2K views
armful
armful
May 22nd 2022 at 10:14PM

Hey, Alfred! I'm glad you made the switch over to Postgres! If you're looking for a highly reliable ORM, I would recommend Prisma, you can check it out at www.prisma.io - Have a great rest of your Sunday!

Reply
Alfred Philip Benigno
Alfred Philip Benigno
May 25th 2022 at 5:39PM

Thank you for the information. I will consider trying it sometime.

Reply

When I am making a website, I do NOT use an online database, because APIs are hard to learn, and just writing to files is easier. So when I code a website, I write to files for a DB. Oh, and by the way, there isn't a single file for a DB, each key has a file, look at the tree below for an example.

database - --- key.txt --- other key.txt

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3 upvotes835 views
.NET Developer at Performance Systems Development

Creating a reliable, scalable app quickly has become much easier and more straightforward. The Microsoft extensions of the runtime libraries make implementing dependency injection, configuration, and logging very convenient and reduces time spent writing boilerplate code. LINQ makes working with data a breeze especially when you have data coming from a variety of sources. Although Entity Framework Core can be a bit much and takes some time to get used to, I think it is a great ORM overall and has a lot to offer. Possibly my favorite part of building .NET apps is the deployment options available. Deploying an app as a single-file, self-contained, executable has been a luxury when deploying to machines without .NET Framework installed and/or installing the latest version was not an option. Single file deployment bundles all application dependencies and the framework into a single executable. The only other file that needed to be distributed was the appsettings.json file. Hosting the app in a Windows Service is cool and definitely beats working with Task Scheduler. It's clean and simple, which is a nice break from the norm.

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4 upvotes1.1K views
Frontend Developer at Self
Shared insights
on
SvelteSvelte

I had used Svelte in one of the projects a year ago. I found it's a compact and a sleek framework. However, I wonder why it is not being used like other frameworks. I would like to use it if there's an opportunity. Component development is a breeze. Any views on this or any opportunities in Svelte would be appreciable.

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3 upvotes1.3K views

We originally had used Algolia for our search features. It's a great service, however the cost was getting to be unmanageable for us. Algolia's pricing model is based around the number of search requests and the number of records. So if you produce a large number of small records the price can quickly get out of hand even if your actual dataset doesn't take up that much space on disk. Spikes in internet traffic can also lead to unexpected increases in billing (even if the traffic comes from bots)

After migrating to Typesense Cloud we have been able to save A LOT of money without losing out on any of the performance we got from Algolia. I do not exaggerate when I say that our overhead for search is less than 25% of what it used to be. Typesense also has the following advantages:

  1. Their cloud offering lets you configure your Typesense nodes and specify how many you want to spin up. This allows you to manage costs in a manner that is way more predictable. (You basically pay for servers/nodes instead of records and requests)

  2. It's completely open source. We can spin up a cluster on our own servers or run it locally.

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3 upvotes1.5K views
CTO at Building Cash

It was important for us to use IaC from the very beginning, since we'll be deploying multiple components to multiple environments, and we want those environments to be easily replicated.

While the pragmatic choice would have been the widely used Terraform, we decided to go with Pulumi, which offers a more familiar syntax to describe your infrastructure (the language of your choice, in our case, Typescript). It also has an interesting built-in way of hiding your secrets for you, which makes managing secrets securely a breeze compared to Terraform.

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4 upvotes365 views
Front End Developer

The start-up guides, tutorials and documentation in general for Firebase are pretty outstanding.

There is 1GB database storage for the free tier as compared to Supabase's 500MB. Not that I think there is anything wrong with Supabase, I intend to try it out someday.

Also if you are doing any sort of personal front-end project, even using a free cluster from MongoDB can be a lot of work and setup, with Firebase (specifically Fire store and Google Authenticator) the implementation of BaaS is quite easy to get up and running.

It's pretty easy to understand the Fires store security rules as well, and if you ever have a hard time trying to figure something out, there is good community support and YouTube tutorials for most topics.

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4 upvotes2 comments8.1K views
Marc Scholten
Marc Scholten
May 16th 2022 at 6:55PM

You might also want to check out https://stackshare.io/thin-backend Thin offers unlimited projects on the free tier which might be useful.

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Jack Heaton
Jack Heaton
May 16th 2022 at 8:17PM

Interesting, thank you

Reply

Firebase is the go to solution for a backend environment for any iOS or Android mobile app. It's easy to setup and integrate. As well as containing a wide range of services to meet lots of different needs. The free service tier give you enough headroom to let you experiment and test before committing to the service.

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6 upvotes8.8K views

In my experience the best basis for any software-based version management. Although GitLab is really fancy and has a lot of good functionality (especially when trying to figure out which branch went wrong where), I chose GitHub since I am working on this project largely by myself and like how easy and fuss-free it is to share and fork.

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5 upvotes9.1K views
Tech lead @ AccountIQ at Bambora

We searched an effect monad to replace scala.concurrent.Future and move our tech stack away from 'Scala as better Java'.

The requirements for the replacement were:

  • Battle-tested & documented;
  • Type-safe;
  • Fiber-safe (not leaking concurrent resources).

ZIO was picked for the following reasons:

  • ZLayers (with zio-magic) that enabled us to structure the application & do DI in a functional way;
  • Typed error channel for safer handling of business-logic exceptions;
  • Built-in Scheduler and retries / cancellation;
  • Steeper learning curve when compared to cats-effect.
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4 upvotes8.5K views

Render is just a simplified frontend for AWS. You don't save any money in the long run and it closes a lot of doors for you if you want to use Infrastucture as a service like Terraform or Pulumi. If you only have one service you want to deploy and you're sure your stack won't grow then maybe I could recommend Render.

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5 upvotes9.4K views
Senior Software Engineer at KMW Reisen GmbH

We use Redis as common in-memory cache for our distributed php processes. Since it also provides message-queue functions and was already in our stack, we didn't use an alternative like RabbitMQ for async handling. We have a multi-instance setup (configured via Ansible) on our maschines. High-Availaibility is configured via Redis Sentinel and HAProxy. The HAProxy-HAProxy setup is also responsible for SSL encryption. We could not use twemproxy since not all commands our application uses are supported.

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6 upvotes9.6K views
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQLPostgreSQL
and
Cloud FirestoreCloud Firestore

I am having a mid size React Native project, I work with SQL databases but I am thinking about moving to NoSQL, I tried to learn NoSQL databases like Cloud Firestore but I faced issues at building the relation between models, also I noticed that the data is being duplicated in many places, should I stick with SQL databases like PostgreSQL or try again with Firebase.

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4 upvotes3.9K views
Replies (8)
Full-stack Developer && Software Engineer at Self-employed

Moving from a SQL database to a noSQL database is a really big deal, congrats 馃憦! In the current industry having handy knowledge of both is really important and I would recommend continuing to learn Firebase even if it feels a little unnatural.

When using noSQL databases you have consider the idea that the models you work with are individual documents. The data in the documents can be duplicated, re-referenced, and completely dissimilar to each other-the only thing differentiating two documents is an ID value. It's normal for data to be duplicated if you don't perform operations on the same document you already created. You stop unnecessary duplication by wrapping your document creation in a function that checks for a certain value (say if you don't want a username value to appear twice you would check if your collection of documents already has one with a username value and then throw an error).

Creating relations in a noSQL database would be done by referencing a different document in another collection (typically with the aforementioned ID value) and then going and finding that document in that collection. Say you want to find a user's posts. In the User document you would have an array of references to different documents in a Post collection, and then you would go to the Post collection and find each document that has a matching ID number to the ones stored in the User's references.

All in all, you have to realize you are working with two completely different ways of storing and relating data, similar to learning a new and completely different language. If you stick too it and don't try to force SQL onto noSQL then you will get the hang of it and it will be very rewarding.

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7 upvotes2 comments3.4K views
Jens G眉nther
Jens G眉nther
May 18th 2022 at 4:36AM

Ray, without the context of the question your reply is 100% correct.

Reply
Ray Arayilakath
Ray Arayilakath
May 18th 2022 at 4:00PM

Thank you, Jens :).

Reply
Full Stack Solution Architect
Recommends
PostgreSQL

From your post about your experiences with NoSQL, it sounds like your application calls for a normalized relational schema. PostgreSQL is a super solid choice for this. It's easy to get up and running, lots of cloud services and application frameworks support it, and you can store JSON and JSONB documents in special columns as needed and even use an HSTORE column for storing key/value pairs, without losing the overall relational schema design and indexing support that you get with a traditional SQL database.

Postgres also supports clustering, so you can scale out if your project gets really successful.

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4 upvotes1 comment404 views
Pavel Nekrasov
Pavel Nekrasov
May 19th 2022 at 5:32PM

It's always better to use a certain database for the right user case if you give us a more detailed description of how you are using postgre at the moment we can advise you on the right database

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Principal Software Engineer at AtCore Tech

LXD based on Linux Containers is simple to install, use and is extremely flexible. I automate all my solutions using the Pylxd module which allows complete control over LXD container creation and configuration including networking and proxies etc.

LXD supports cloud-init which makes templating the base package, user and configuration painless.

Each LXD instance is a full Linux instance so setting up multiple tasks/processes via the standard systemd of each instance is quick and easy.

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5 upvotes8.5K views
Web Designer & Developer at Self-employed

This will be weird. I have pretty aggravating ADHD that makes project organization and planning tricky. I was finding myself torn on how to sort my React components and the resources they require in a manner that made sense to me, but it resulted in a lot of projects being re-initialized repeatedly because "it's not quite right".

Vue destroyed that anxiety with its single-file component (SFC) model and composition API. When a single .vue file can pack its relevant requirements into a script, template, and style tag, I no longer need to consider how dependencies need to be organized. I just write exactly what the component needs into the file, and save it wherever I require it.

As for static assets, Vite helped with this by defaulting root paths to the /public folder, keeping my imports short and my assets away from my code.

My current portfolio project uses /src, /src/components, and /src/modules for the Vue parts, and /public contains my logos, images, stylesheets, etc. The level of specificity has helped me compartmentalize my tasks and make the development process feel manageable and digestible, no matter how large it gets.

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12 upvotes1 comment16.5K views
Jack Heaton
Jack Heaton
May 13th 2022 at 4:20PM

I was looking into using Vue, and also have experienced similar feelings about project organization in React (and Next.js for that matter).

Thanks for sharing this, it's a helpful take!

Reply

I've used JS in one form or another in almost every web app I've worked on for the past 10 years. Usually frontend but have also used it in a server-contexts like with nodejs.

Projects:

  • Robot control system (front and backend)
  • Personal websites
  • Validation software frontends
  • Workspace microservice (nodejs)
  • Many more
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8 upvotes18.4K views
CTO at WebBoss Ltd

I was looking for a new IDE that could do everything I needed in one place easily. I needed GIT and FTP integration, plus MySQL to manage and view databases. I found PHPStorm to be the best for all this after trialling a few different platforms (like Sublime Text), and preferred the way PHPStorm worked and functioned.

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8 upvotes1 comment19.1K views
Richard van Beelen
Richard van Beelen
May 1st 2022 at 6:11PM

PHPStorm is the best choice, on the left side you have your local project, on the right side your online project incl. your database. At the bottom of your screen terminal options for both local and server. You can easily drag and drop files from the local project to the server on the right.

Adding new tables or columns to your database is very easy, add, edit and view databases and tables as you are used to with PHPMyAdmin. What also makes PHPStorm great is the immediate display of errors with a clear explanation, it helps you to replace the wrong codes automatically, it also gives you advice or a better and cleaner way. Very useful especially if you want to get your PHP project ready for PHP 8.1+, at the bottom of the screen you can easily switch between PHP versions and see immediately what can be improved.

PHPStorm is definitely recommended, with PHPStorm you do not need other programs and tools like Filezilla, PHPMyAdmin, git tools, PowerShell / Putty, ect. anymore. Everything is there and ready to use right after installation, you can however install additional plugins like Tabnine. You don't really need more, PHPStorm is so great that it makes things much easier and your projects will be developed much faster.

The only drawback compared to VScode is that PHPStorm demands a lot from your computer in terms of memory, but this also varies by project and setting. PHPStorm is the best choice for any PHP developer/scripter but also for developers/scripers for both JS/NodeJS, HTML, CSS/SCSS and even Python.

For those who haven't explored PHPStorm yet, give it a try. Of course everything takes some getting used to at first but eventually you will discover the power and luxury of PHPStorm, it will really save you a lot of time and you won't want anything else, good luck!

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Software Engineer at Mixtape Bot
Migrated
from
NGINXNGINX
to
TraefikTraefik

With Traefik, I can now proxy services with 4 simple labels on a Docker container. I don't have to copy files and replace the URL anymore. With Traefik, I also don't need to restart it to add/update/remove proxies, which is really nice, as with Nginx I would have to do that every time I made a change.

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7 upvotes1 comment20.1K views
Charlie Nguyen
Charlie Nguyen
April 20th 2022 at 12:16PM

good news, thanks!

Reply
Developer at Venhan
Needs advice
on
.NET Core.NET Core
and
.NET.NET

Hey everyone, I am a backend developer who specializes in Java and Spring Boot having an experience of 4 years. And due to my shift in the project, now I need to deal with the .NET Core technology, as a Java developer before I need to know where to start in order to support the project and build REST API.

Can I get advice on how to move on to the new backend stack and what to learn and how to get hands-on with the .NET?

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3 upvotes4.6K views
Replies (3)
Lead Software Developer/Eng. at VOYD AB
Recommends
.NET Core
.NET

IMHO I think it is the best framework to build software on. Since you are coming from Java, It should not be too difficult to adjust to C#. NET Core has come a long way. NET6 is just amazing. With the minimal API, https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/minimal-apis?view=aspnetcore-6.0 REST API should be very easy work for starters. When you settle in, you can go more advanced.

Although this is dated - https://download.microsoft.com/download/D/E/E/DEE91FC0-7AA9-4F6E-9FFA-8658AA0FA080/CSharp%20for%20Java%20Developers%20-%20Cheat%20Sheet.pdf it provides you side by side comparison of syntax. Another cool read is - https://betterprogramming.pub/java-to-c-c-to-java-f766c9f659c4

Feel free to reach out if you need any assistance.

Welcome aboard

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7 upvotes2 comments3.8K views
Abhi ram
Abhi ram
April 25th 2022 at 6:19PM

Hi Bernard, Thank you! for sharing the resources which helps me out to see the differences from Java to .Net & to get started with this new tech. Mainly,for the cheat sheet and cool blog to get an immediate understanding.

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Aaron Roach
Aaron Roach
May 4th 2022 at 9:58PM

I would agree. As a Java developer you'll feel very comfortable, and there are a lot of things that you may come to get used to with the language that would make switching back to Java really difficult. There's just a lot of quality of life features about C#/.NET Core/.NET 5+ that make it way easier and less verbose than Java, in my opinion.

Reply
.NET Developer at Performance Systems Development
Recommends
.NET Core
.NET

You will find that the transition from Java to C# is pretty smooth. Working with .NET has become much more intuitive and has a lot to offer. I highly recommend using Visual Studio as your IDE. It makes things much easier and is not too different than other IDEs like IntelliJ. There are also Visual Studio templates for web APIs that make it really easy to get up and running. Microsoft has good documentation and tutorials to help you get familiar with the technology. I would start there.

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3 upvotes306 views
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Lead Application Architect at TekPartners

Full disclosure; I worked for both Telerik and Infragistics in Developer Relations for these projects. From my point of view, neither is a clear "winner" in this space. Kendo has some nice features and Ignite doesn't have and vice versa. We ended up picking Kendo because we needed to settle on one of these, and most of our clients already owned Kendo because it came with some other Telerik product. That's it. It could have very easily gone the other way, but Telerik kinda won the ground war here, so...

Having said that, the only tool we really use is the grid (the rest of them are no better than Flowbite/HTML5/etc. controls. And even then, we really need to be leveraging the advanced functionality of the grid before telling the client they'll have to buy a support license.

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4 upvotes7.1K views
Security Software Engineer at Pinterest

Security team builds services, solutions and tools for teams within Pinterest to manage accesses of critical production resources as well as facilitate adding authentication, authorization and accounting within critical production micro-services. Issuing identities to > 130k AWS EC2 instances, using them to make authentication and authorization decisions high bandwidth critical traffic flow conditions while services communicate in a mesh, requires a great deal of performance and stability. GoLang provides exactly that. Also primary engineering skills in Security team need not to be fully familiar with complex programming logic requires in Java/Kotlin while avoiding the pitfalls on runtime failures or uncertain behavior using Python in production leads us to GoLang

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8 upvotes37.4K views
Needs advice
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact
and
AngularJSAngularJS

I love Node.js and MongoDB (A database that goes well with Node). I will use it for embedded systems and backends for web apps. I have questions for frontend JS:

  1. Which front end JavaScript framework is good for web apps

  2. Which front end JS framework is good for PWAs(progressive web apps)

Backstory: I experimented with Javascript. Built lots of things with it. I want to organize my Javascript toolset by seeing which tool is useful when(e.g. use Angular for enterprise, use Vanilla for fun, etc.)

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5 upvotes26.6K views
Replies (4)
Recommends
Vue.js
React

I have a view that Angular js changed its design patterns too frequently and messed up while trying to be too obsessive. Vue 3 is simple powerful, high performance and brings the composition API that also brings overall simplicity. It can be done using pure JavaScript and in my view that's a plus point in development, if you are experienced developer and avoid type mistakes etc..

Most other frontend frameworks support Vue. For e.g. Ionic..

The server side rendering can bring magic of SEO friendly sites while being single page application.

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9 upvotes25.2K views
Recommends
Vue.js
AngularJS

I've been using AngularJS and Vue.js extensively and can recommend AngularJS in a more enterprise environment and Vue.js for personal projects. AngularJS has, in my humble opinion, a lot of boilerplate code, which is useful keeping things organised in a team setup. Vue.js has a more minimalistic approach.

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6 upvotes25.2K views
View all (4)
Head of R&D & Partner at SYNDIKAT7 GmbH

Primarily for the exchange between a frontend client and a backend system. Powerful tools for integration into frontend applications (written with React or Angular, ...), a possibility for exposing a playground, self-documented API, powerful query language (for instance, the app decides which information is needed). You can do this also with Jersey or other similar solutions but (most of the time) then you need to define your own query language on top of HTTP.

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5 upvotes23.2K views
Founder at BinksDev Software

The tool I was hosting was a relatively small NodeJS application which utilized the Spotify API - it was meant to be very low maintenance, but still required intervention (to renew certificates, restart the Node app when it crashed, etc). It was also using old NodeJS frameworks that were either deprecated or very outdated.

I made the decision to migrate the service to Google Cloud Run, and change the underlying database from MySQL to RavenDB, for performance and ease-of-use reasons. The move was relatively easy - the only challenge was around migrating from old libraries I was using to perform REST requests, and of course adjusting from a password authentication system to client certificates

I chose to migrate to RavenDB for their advanced dashboard, which allows you to monitor databases, queries, and cluster node performance. Working with RavenDB has been a much smoother and user-friendly experience compared to MySQL.

Hosting the application in Cloud Run, rather than on a dedicated Linux VM, meant that costs were drastically reduced (from 拢10/month for an AWS EC2 micro instance to 拢0 for Cloud Run). The serverless architecture means you're only paying when a request is made to the URL - for a small service such as mine, this was a life saver.

Best of all? I get advanced monitoring statistics from Google Cloud, showing me exactly how many requests I get per day, how much memory/CPU is used, and how many container instances are active to serve traffic. When an error occurs, Cloud Trace keeps track of the exception, the line it occurred on, and how many times the error has been seen.

I knew this migration would lead to a low-maintenance solution that I was hoping for, but I didn't realize how low maintenance it would truly be - I haven't needed to even look at the service since it was migrated, aside from checking I allocated enough cores/memory to the containers.

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5 upvotes26.1K views