Alternatives to Google Cloud Platform logo

Alternatives to Google Cloud Platform

Microsoft Azure, GoDaddy, Google App Engine, Amazon Web Services, and Google Compute Engine are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Google Cloud Platform.
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What is Google Cloud Platform and what are its top alternatives?

It helps you build what's next with secure infrastructure, developer tools, APIs, data analytics and machine learning. It is a suite of cloud computing services that runs on the same infrastructure that Google uses internally for its end-user products, such as Google Search and YouTube.
Google Cloud Platform is a tool in the Cloud Hosting category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Google Cloud Platform

  • Microsoft Azure
    Microsoft Azure

    Azure is an open and flexible cloud platform that enables you to quickly build, deploy and manage applications across a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. You can build applications using any language, tool or framework. And you can integrate your public cloud applications with your existing IT environment. ...

  • GoDaddy
    GoDaddy

    Go Daddy makes registering Domain Names fast, simple, and affordable. It is a trusted domain registrar that empowers people with creative ideas to succeed online. ...

  • Google App Engine
    Google App Engine

    Google has a reputation for highly reliable, high performance infrastructure. With App Engine you can take advantage of the 10 years of knowledge Google has in running massively scalable, performance driven systems. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. ...

  • Amazon Web Services
    Amazon Web Services

    It provides on-demand cloud computing platforms to individuals, companies and governments. It offers reliable, scalable, and inexpensive cloud computing services. ...

  • Google Compute Engine
    Google Compute Engine

    Google Compute Engine is a service that provides virtual machines that run on Google infrastructure. Google Compute Engine offers scale, performance, and value that allows you to easily launch large compute clusters on Google's infrastructure. There are no upfront investments and you can run up to thousands of virtual CPUs on a system that has been designed from the ground up to be fast, and to offer strong consistency of performance. ...

  • Firebase
    Firebase

    Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds. ...

  • G Suite
    G Suite

    An integrated suite of secure, cloud-native collaboration and productivity apps. It includes Gmail, Docs, Drive, Calendar, Meet and more. ...

  • Heroku
    Heroku

    Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. ...

Google Cloud Platform alternatives & related posts

Microsoft Azure logo

Microsoft Azure

22.2K
14.9K
768
Integrated cloud services and infrastructure to support computing, database, analytics, mobile, and web scenarios.
22.2K
14.9K
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PROS OF MICROSOFT AZURE
  • 114
    Scales well and quite easy
  • 96
    Can use .Net or open source tools
  • 81
    Startup friendly
  • 73
    Startup plans via BizSpark
  • 62
    High performance
  • 38
    Wide choice of services
  • 32
    Low cost
  • 32
    Lots of integrations
  • 31
    Reliability
  • 19
    Twillio & Github are directly accessible
  • 13
    RESTful API
  • 10
    Enterprise Grade
  • 10
    PaaS
  • 10
    Startup support
  • 8
    DocumentDB
  • 7
    In person support
  • 6
    Virtual Machines
  • 6
    Free for students
  • 6
    Service Bus
  • 5
    Redis Cache
  • 5
    It rocks
  • 4
    SQL Databases
  • 4
    CDN
  • 4
    Infrastructure Services
  • 4
    Storage, Backup, and Recovery
  • 3
    Integration
  • 3
    Big Data
  • 3
    HDInsight
  • 3
    BizSpark 60k Azure Benefit
  • 3
    Preview Portal
  • 3
    IaaS
  • 3
    Scheduler
  • 3
    Built on Node.js
  • 2
    Backup
  • 2
    Open cloud
  • 2
    Web
  • 2
    SaaS
  • 2
    Big Compute
  • 2
    Mobile
  • 2
    Media
  • 2
    Dev-Test
  • 2
    Storage
  • 2
    StorSimple
  • 2
    Machine Learning
  • 2
    Stream Analytics
  • 2
    Data Factory
  • 2
    Event Hubs
  • 2
    Virtual Network
  • 2
    ExpressRoute
  • 2
    Traffic Manager
  • 2
    Media Services
  • 2
    BizTalk Services
  • 2
    Site Recovery
  • 2
    Active Directory
  • 2
    Multi-Factor Authentication
  • 2
    Visual Studio Online
  • 2
    Application Insights
  • 2
    Automation
  • 2
    Operational Insights
  • 2
    Key Vault
  • 2
    Infrastructure near your customers
  • 2
    Easy Deployment
  • 1
    Enterprise customer preferences
  • 1
    Security
  • 1
    Documentation
  • 1
    Best cloud platfrom
  • 1
    Easy and fast to start with
  • 1
    Remote Debugging
CONS OF MICROSOFT AZURE
  • 6
    Confusing UI
  • 2
    Expensive plesk on Azure

related Microsoft Azure posts

Omar Mehilba
Co-Founder and COO at Magalix · | 19 upvotes · 283.2K views

We are hardcore Kubernetes users and contributors. We loved the automation it provides. However, as our team grew and added more clusters and microservices, capacity and resources management becomes a massive pain to us. We started suffering from a lot of outages and unexpected behavior as we promote our code from dev to production environments. Luckily we were working on our AI-powered tools to understand different dependencies, predict usage, and calculate the right resources and configurations that should be applied to our infrastructure and microservices. We dogfooded our agent (http://github.com/magalixcorp/magalix-agent) and were able to stabilize as the #autopilot continuously recovered any miscalculations we made or because of unexpected changes in workloads. We are open sourcing our agent in a few days. Check it out and let us know what you think! We run workloads on Microsoft Azure Google Kubernetes Engine and Amazon EC2 and we're all about Go and Python!

See more
Kestas Barzdaitis
Entrepreneur & Engineer · | 16 upvotes · 562.5K views

CodeFactor being a #SAAS product, our goal was to run on a cloud-native infrastructure since day one. We wanted to stay product focused, rather than having to work on the infrastructure that supports the application. We needed a cloud-hosting provider that would be reliable, economical and most efficient for our product.

CodeFactor.io aims to provide an automated and frictionless code review service for software developers. That requires agility, instant provisioning, autoscaling, security, availability and compliance management features. We looked at the top three #IAAS providers that take up the majority of market share: Amazon's Amazon EC2 , Microsoft's Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

AWS has been available since 2006 and has developed the most extensive services ant tools variety at a massive scale. Azure and GCP are about half the AWS age, but also satisfied our technical requirements.

It is worth noting that even though all three providers support Docker containerization services, GCP has the most robust offering due to their investments in Kubernetes. Also, if you are a Microsoft shop, and develop in .NET - Visual Studio Azure shines at integration there and all your existing .NET code works seamlessly on Azure. All three providers have serverless computing offerings (AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions). Additionally, all three providers have machine learning tools, but GCP appears to be the most developer-friendly, intuitive and complete when it comes to #Machinelearning and #AI.

The prices between providers are competitive across the board. For our requirements, AWS would have been the most expensive, GCP the least expensive and Azure was in the middle. Plus, if you #Autoscale frequently with large deltas, note that Azure and GCP have per minute billing, where AWS bills you per hour. We also applied for the #Startup programs with all three providers, and this is where Azure shined. While AWS and GCP for startups would have covered us for about one year of infrastructure costs, Azure Sponsorship would cover about two years of CodeFactor's hosting costs. Moreover, Azure Team was terrific - I felt that they wanted to work with us where for AWS and GCP we were just another startup.

In summary, we were leaning towards GCP. GCP's advantages in containerization, automation toolset, #Devops mindset, and pricing were the driving factors there. Nevertheless, we could not say no to Azure's financial incentives and a strong sense of partnership and support throughout the process.

Bottom line is, IAAS offerings with AWS, Azure, and GCP are evolving fast. At CodeFactor, we aim to be platform agnostic where it is practical and retain the flexibility to cherry-pick the best products across providers.

See more
GoDaddy logo

GoDaddy

518
481
11
Your all in one solution to grow online
518
481
+ 1
11
PROS OF GODADDY
  • 8
    Flexible payment methods for domains
  • 3
    .io support
CONS OF GODADDY
  • 2
    Constantly trying to upsell you
  • 1
    Not a great UI

related GoDaddy posts

Google App Engine logo

Google App Engine

9.1K
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Build web applications on the same scalable systems that power Google applications
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PROS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
  • 144
    Easy to deploy
  • 106
    Auto scaling
  • 80
    Good free plan
  • 62
    Easy management
  • 56
    Scalability
  • 35
    Low cost
  • 32
    Comprehensive set of features
  • 28
    All services in one place
  • 22
    Simple scaling
  • 19
    Quick and reliable cloud servers
  • 6
    Granular Billing
  • 5
    Easy to develop and unit test
  • 4
    Monitoring gives comprehensive set of key indicators
  • 3
    Create APIs quickly with cloud endpoints
  • 3
    Really easy to quickly bring up a full stack
  • 2
    No Ops
  • 2
    Mostly up
CONS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Google App Engine posts

    Nick Rockwell
    SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 11 upvotes · 356.3K views

    So, the shift from Amazon EC2 to Google App Engine and generally #AWS to #GCP was a long decision and in the end, it's one that we've taken with eyes open and that we reserve the right to modify at any time. And to be clear, we continue to do a lot of stuff with AWS. But, by default, the content of the decision was, for our consumer-facing products, we're going to use GCP first. And if there's some reason why we don't think that's going to work out great, then we'll happily use AWS. In practice, that hasn't really happened. We've been able to meet almost 100% of our needs in GCP.

    So it's basically mostly Google Kubernetes Engine , we're mostly running stuff on Kubernetes right now.

    #AWStoGCPmigration #cloudmigration #migration

    See more
    Aliadoc Team

    In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

    For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

    For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

    We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

    Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

    See more
    Amazon Web Services logo

    Amazon Web Services

    99
    88
    0
    The world’s most comprehensive and broadly adopted cloud platform, offering over 165 fully featured services
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    PROS OF AMAZON WEB SERVICES
    • 3
      Industry standard cloud vendor
    • 1
      Best hosting
    • 1
      Free tier
    • 1
      Scalable and high performance
    CONS OF AMAZON WEB SERVICES
    • 0
      Amazing severless stack with lambda and api gateway

    related Amazon Web Services posts

    Mohamed Labouardy

    Google Compute Engine Amazon Web Services OVH Microsoft Azure Go GitHub

    Last week, we released a fresh new release of Komiser with support of multiple AWS accounts. Komiser support multiple AWS accounts through named profiles that are stored in the credentials files.

    You can now analyze and identify potential cost savings on unlimited AWS environments (Production, Staging, Sandbox, etc) on one single dashboard.

    Read the full story in the blog post.

    See more
    Mohamed Labouardy

    Google Compute Engine Amazon Web Services Go Docker Material Design for Angular Microsoft Azure GitHub I’m super excited to annonce the release of Komiser:2.1.0 with beta support of Google Cloud Platform. You can now use one single open source tool to detect both AWS and GCP overspending.

    Komiser allows you to analyze and manage #cloud cost, usage, #security, and governance in one place. Hence, detecting potential vulnerabilities that could put your cloud environment at risk.

    It allows you also to control your usage and create visibility across all used services to achieve maximum cost-effectiveness and get a deep understanding of how you spend on the #AWS, #GCP and #Azure.

    See more
    Google Compute Engine logo

    Google Compute Engine

    11K
    8.2K
    423
    Run large-scale workloads on virtual machines hosted on Google's infrastructure.
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    PROS OF GOOGLE COMPUTE ENGINE
    • 87
      Backed by google
    • 79
      Easy to scale
    • 75
      High-performance virtual machines
    • 58
      Performance
    • 52
      Fast and easy provisioning
    • 15
      Load balancing
    • 12
      Compliance and security
    • 9
      Kubernetes
    • 8
      GitHub Integration
    • 7
      Consistency
    • 3
      Good documentation
    • 3
      One Click Setup Options
    • 3
      Free $300 credit (12 months)
    • 2
      Ease of Use and GitHub support
    • 2
      Great integration and product support
    • 2
      Escort
    • 1
      Integration with mobile notification services
    • 1
      Easy Snapshot and Backup feature
    • 1
      Low cost
    • 1
      Support many OS
    • 1
      Very Reliable
    • 1
      Nice UI
    CONS OF GOOGLE COMPUTE ENGINE
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Google Compute Engine posts

      Kestas Barzdaitis
      Entrepreneur & Engineer · | 16 upvotes · 562.5K views

      CodeFactor being a #SAAS product, our goal was to run on a cloud-native infrastructure since day one. We wanted to stay product focused, rather than having to work on the infrastructure that supports the application. We needed a cloud-hosting provider that would be reliable, economical and most efficient for our product.

      CodeFactor.io aims to provide an automated and frictionless code review service for software developers. That requires agility, instant provisioning, autoscaling, security, availability and compliance management features. We looked at the top three #IAAS providers that take up the majority of market share: Amazon's Amazon EC2 , Microsoft's Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

      AWS has been available since 2006 and has developed the most extensive services ant tools variety at a massive scale. Azure and GCP are about half the AWS age, but also satisfied our technical requirements.

      It is worth noting that even though all three providers support Docker containerization services, GCP has the most robust offering due to their investments in Kubernetes. Also, if you are a Microsoft shop, and develop in .NET - Visual Studio Azure shines at integration there and all your existing .NET code works seamlessly on Azure. All three providers have serverless computing offerings (AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions). Additionally, all three providers have machine learning tools, but GCP appears to be the most developer-friendly, intuitive and complete when it comes to #Machinelearning and #AI.

      The prices between providers are competitive across the board. For our requirements, AWS would have been the most expensive, GCP the least expensive and Azure was in the middle. Plus, if you #Autoscale frequently with large deltas, note that Azure and GCP have per minute billing, where AWS bills you per hour. We also applied for the #Startup programs with all three providers, and this is where Azure shined. While AWS and GCP for startups would have covered us for about one year of infrastructure costs, Azure Sponsorship would cover about two years of CodeFactor's hosting costs. Moreover, Azure Team was terrific - I felt that they wanted to work with us where for AWS and GCP we were just another startup.

      In summary, we were leaning towards GCP. GCP's advantages in containerization, automation toolset, #Devops mindset, and pricing were the driving factors there. Nevertheless, we could not say no to Azure's financial incentives and a strong sense of partnership and support throughout the process.

      Bottom line is, IAAS offerings with AWS, Azure, and GCP are evolving fast. At CodeFactor, we aim to be platform agnostic where it is practical and retain the flexibility to cherry-pick the best products across providers.

      See more
      Mohamed Labouardy

      Google Compute Engine Amazon Web Services OVH Microsoft Azure Go GitHub

      Last week, we released a fresh new release of Komiser with support of multiple AWS accounts. Komiser support multiple AWS accounts through named profiles that are stored in the credentials files.

      You can now analyze and identify potential cost savings on unlimited AWS environments (Production, Staging, Sandbox, etc) on one single dashboard.

      Read the full story in the blog post.

      See more
      Firebase logo

      Firebase

      36K
      30.9K
      1.9K
      The Realtime App Platform
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      PROS OF FIREBASE
      • 369
        Realtime backend made easy
      • 268
        Fast and responsive
      • 240
        Easy setup
      • 213
        Real-time
      • 188
        JSON
      • 133
        Free
      • 126
        Backed by google
      • 82
        Angular adaptor
      • 67
        Reliable
      • 35
        Great customer support
      • 31
        Great documentation
      • 25
        Real-time synchronization
      • 21
        Mobile friendly
      • 18
        Rapid prototyping
      • 14
        Great security
      • 12
        Automatic scaling
      • 11
        Freakingly awesome
      • 8
        Angularfire is an amazing addition!
      • 8
        Super fast development
      • 8
        Chat
      • 6
        Firebase hosting
      • 6
        Built in user auth/oauth
      • 6
        Awesome next-gen backend
      • 6
        Ios adaptor
      • 4
        Very easy to use
      • 4
        Speed of light
      • 3
        Great
      • 3
        It's made development super fast
      • 3
        Brilliant for startups
      • 2
        .net
      • 2
        JS Offline and Sync suport
      • 2
        Low battery consumption
      • 2
        Push notification
      • 2
        Free hosting
      • 2
        Cloud functions
      • 2
        The concurrent updates create a great experience
      • 2
        I can quickly create static web apps with no backend
      • 2
        Great all-round functionality
      • 2
        Free authentication solution
      • 1
        CDN & cache out of the box
      • 1
        Google's support
      • 1
        Simple and easy
      • 1
        Faster workflow
      • 1
        Free SSL
      • 1
        Easy Reactjs integration
      • 1
        Easy to use
      • 1
        Large
      • 1
        Serverless
      • 1
        Good Free Limits
      CONS OF FIREBASE
      • 31
        Can become expensive
      • 16
        No open source, you depend on external company
      • 15
        Scalability is not infinite
      • 9
        Not Flexible Enough
      • 7
        Cant filter queries
      • 3
        Very unstable server
      • 3
        No Relational Data
      • 2
        Too many errors
      • 2
        No offline sync

      related Firebase posts

      Stephen Gheysens
      Lead Solutions Engineer at Inscribe · | 14 upvotes · 1.1M views

      Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

      My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

      See more
      Tassanai Singprom

      This is my stack in Application & Data

      JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

      My Utilities Tools

      Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

      My Devops Tools

      Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

      My Business Tools

      Slack

      See more
      G Suite logo

      G Suite

      30.2K
      14.1K
      2.5K
      Collaboration and productivity apps for Business
      30.2K
      14.1K
      + 1
      2.5K
      PROS OF G SUITE
      • 609
        Gmail
      • 447
        Google docs
      • 365
        Calendar
      • 284
        Great for startups
      • 230
        Easy to work
      • 115
        Document management & workflow
      • 110
        Very easy to share
      • 80
        No brainer
      • 59
        Google groups
      • 59
        Google scripts & api
      • 22
        Google drive
      • 16
        Popular
      • 13
        No spam, phishing protection
      • 12
        Easy
      • 12
        Google Spreadsheets
      • 10
        Cloud based and collaboration
      • 7
        Simple and fast document creation collaboration
      • 6
        Best Cloud environment ever
      • 5
        Google maps api
      • 3
        Geolocation
      • 3
        Google-powered Search in Gmail
      • 2
        Awesome Collaboration Tools
      • 1
        Single sign-on
      • 1
        music
      • 1
        Simple
      • 1
        도메인 단위로 어플을 관리할 수 있고, 클라우드지만 강력한 보안기능과 기기관리 기능을 제공
      CONS OF G SUITE
      • 6
        Starting to get pricey
      • 4
        Good luck changing domains
      • 1
        Lesser fonts and styling available in mail compose
      • 1
        Long emails get truncated

      related G Suite posts

      Yonas Beshawred

      Using Screenhero via Slack was getting to be pretty horrible. Video and sound quality was often times pretty bad and worst of all the service just wasn't reliable. We all had high hopes when the acquisition went through but ultimately, the product just didn't live up to expectations. We ended up trying Zoom after I had heard about it from some friends at other companies. We noticed the video/sound quality was better, and more importantly it was super reliable. The Slack integration was awesome (just type /zoom and it starts a call)

      You can schedule recurring calls which is helpful. There's a G Suite (Google Calendar) integration which lets you add a Zoom call (w/dial in info + link to web/mobile) with the click of a button.

      Meeting recordings (video and audio) are really nice, you get recordings stored in the cloud on the higher tier plans. One of our engineers, Jerome, actually built a cool little Slack integration using the Slack API and Zoom API so that every time a recording is processed, a link gets posted to the "event-recordings" channel. The iOS app is great too!

      #WebAndVideoConferencing #videochat

      See more
      Wesly Nouse

      We use G Suite because of its cheap costs, easy management/administration, Excellent DKIM score, and everything that comes with it. We switched from Microsoft Office 365 because it doesn't work on Linux which is our OS of choice. Furthermore, G Suite does not lack any of the features that Office365 had to offer, I'd even say it offers more.

      See more
      Heroku logo

      Heroku

      23.7K
      19K
      3.2K
      Build, deliver, monitor and scale web apps and APIs with a trail blazing developer experience.
      23.7K
      19K
      + 1
      3.2K
      PROS OF HEROKU
      • 705
        Easy deployment
      • 459
        Free for side projects
      • 374
        Huge time-saver
      • 348
        Simple scaling
      • 261
        Low devops skills required
      • 190
        Easy setup
      • 174
        Add-ons for almost everything
      • 153
        Beginner friendly
      • 150
        Better for startups
      • 133
        Low learning curve
      • 48
        Postgres hosting
      • 41
        Easy to add collaborators
      • 30
        Faster development
      • 24
        Awesome documentation
      • 19
        Simple rollback
      • 19
        Focus on product, not deployment
      • 15
        Natural companion for rails development
      • 15
        Easy integration
      • 12
        Great customer support
      • 8
        GitHub integration
      • 6
        Painless & well documented
      • 6
        No-ops
      • 4
        I love that they make it free to launch a side project
      • 4
        Free
      • 3
        Great UI
      • 3
        Just works
      • 2
        PostgreSQL forking and following
      • 2
        MySQL extension
      • 1
        Security
      • 1
        Able to host stuff good like Discord Bot
      • 0
        Sec
      CONS OF HEROKU
      • 26
        Super expensive
      • 8
        Not a whole lot of flexibility
      • 6
        Storage
      • 6
        No usable MySQL option
      • 4
        Low performance on free tier
      • 1
        24/7 support is $1,000 per month

      related Heroku posts

      Russel Werner
      Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 32 upvotes · 1.7M views

      StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

      Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

      #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

      See more
      Simon Reymann
      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 29 upvotes · 5.3M views

      Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

      • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
      • Respectively Git as revision control system
      • SourceTree as Git GUI
      • Visual Studio Code as IDE
      • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
      • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
      • SonarQube as quality gate
      • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
      • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
      • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
      • Heroku for deploying in test environments
      • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
      • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
      • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
      • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
      • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

      The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

      • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
      • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
      • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
      • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
      • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
      • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
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