Alternatives to JHipster logo

Alternatives to JHipster

Spring Boot, Grails, Django, Node.js, and ASP.NET are the most popular alternatives and competitors to JHipster.
29
19
+ 1
0

What is JHipster and what are its top alternatives?

It is a free and open-source application generator used to quickly develop modern web applications and Microservices using Spring Boot + Angular / React / Vue.
JHipster is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
JHipster is an open source tool with 14.9K GitHub stars and 3K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to JHipster's open source repository on GitHub

JHipster alternatives & related posts

Spring Boot logo

Spring Boot

4.2K
3.3K
489
4.2K
3.3K
+ 1
489
Create Spring-powered, production-grade applications and services with absolute minimum fuss
Spring Boot logo
Spring Boot
VS
JHipster logo
JHipster

related Spring Boot posts

Praveen Mooli
Praveen Mooli
Technical Leader at Taylor and Francis · | 11 upvotes · 95.2K views
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB Atlas
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Serverless
Serverless
Docker
Docker
Terraform
Terraform
Travis CI
Travis CI
GitHub
GitHub
RxJS
RxJS
Angular 2
Angular 2
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Amazon SQS
Amazon SQS
Amazon SNS
Amazon SNS
Amazon Kinesis Firehose
Amazon Kinesis Firehose
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon Kinesis
Flask
Flask
Python
Python
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
Node.js
Node.js
Spring Boot
Spring Boot
Java
Java
#Data
#Devops
#Webapps
#Eventsourcingframework
#Microservices
#Backend

We are in the process of building a modern content platform to deliver our content through various channels. We decided to go with Microservices architecture as we wanted scale. Microservice architecture style is an approach to developing an application as a suite of small independently deployable services built around specific business capabilities. You can gain modularity, extensive parallelism and cost-effective scaling by deploying services across many distributed servers. Microservices modularity facilitates independent updates/deployments, and helps to avoid single point of failure, which can help prevent large-scale outages. We also decided to use Event Driven Architecture pattern which is a popular distributed asynchronous architecture pattern used to produce highly scalable applications. The event-driven architecture is made up of highly decoupled, single-purpose event processing components that asynchronously receive and process events.

To build our #Backend capabilities we decided to use the following: 1. #Microservices - Java with Spring Boot , Node.js with ExpressJS and Python with Flask 2. #Eventsourcingframework - Amazon Kinesis , Amazon Kinesis Firehose , Amazon SNS , Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda 3. #Data - Amazon RDS , Amazon DynamoDB , Amazon S3 , MongoDB Atlas

To build #Webapps we decided to use Angular 2 with RxJS

#Devops - GitHub , Travis CI , Terraform , Docker , Serverless

See more
Flutter
Flutter
Vue.js
Vue.js
Trello
Trello
notion.so
notion.so
Jira
Jira
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Gradle
Gradle
Travis CI
Travis CI
Jenkins
Jenkins
CircleCI
CircleCI
Webpack
Webpack
Docker
Docker
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
Dropwizard
Dropwizard
Spring Boot
Spring Boot
MySQL
MySQL
Kafka
Kafka
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Redis
Redis
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
MongoDB
MongoDB
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
nginx
nginx
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
Java
Java
Application & Data

Java JavaScript Node.js nginx Ubuntu MongoDB Amazon EC2 Redis Amazon S3 AWS Lambda RabbitMQ Kafka MySQL Spring Boot Dropwizard Vue.js Flutter

Utilities

Google Analytics Elasticsearch Amazon Route 53

DevOps

GitHub Docker Webpack CircleCI Jenkins Travis CI Gradle Apache Maven

Cooperation Tools

Jira notion.so Trello

See more
Grails logo

Grails

226
184
265
226
184
+ 1
265
An Open Source, full stack, web application framework for the JVM
Grails logo
Grails
VS
JHipster logo
JHipster

related Grails posts

Alex A
Alex A
Founder at PRIZ Guru · | 3 upvotes · 31.9K views
atPRIZ GuruPRIZ Guru
Gradle
Gradle
Groovy
Groovy
Scala
Scala
Play
Play
Grails
Grails

Some may wonder why did we choose Grails ? Really good question :) We spent quite some time to evaluate what framework to go with and the battle was between Play Scala and Grails ( Groovy ). We have enough experience with both and, to be honest, I absolutely in love with Scala; however, the tipping point for us was the potential speed of development. Grails allows much faster development pace than Play , and as of right now this is the most important parameter. We might convert later though. Also, worth mentioning, by default Grails comes with Gradle as a build tool, so why change?

See more
Django logo

Django

7.5K
5.4K
2.8K
7.5K
5.4K
+ 1
2.8K
The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
Django logo
Django
VS
JHipster logo
JHipster

related Django posts

Dmitry Mukhin
Dmitry Mukhin
at Uploadcare · | 22 upvotes · 155.8K views
atUploadcareUploadcare
PostCSS
PostCSS
Preact
Preact
Ember.js
Ember.js
React
React
Python
Python
Django
Django

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

See more
Python
Python
Django
Django
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js

Django or NodeJS? Hi, I’m thinking about which software I should use for my web-app. What about Node.js or Django for the back-end? I want to create an online preparation course for the final school exams in my country. At the beginning for maths. The course should contain tutorials and a lot of exercises of different types. E.g. multiple choice, user text/number input and drawing tasks. The exercises should change (different levels) with the learning progress. Wrong questions should asked again with different numbers. I also want a score system and statistics. So far, I have got only limited web development skills. (some HTML, CSS, Bootstrap and Wordpress). I don’t know JavaScript or Python.

Possible pros for Python / Django: - easy syntax, easier to learn for me as a beginner - fast development, earlier release - libraries for mathematical and scientific computation

Possible pros for JavaScript / Node.js: - great performance, better choice for real time applications: user should get the answer for a question quickly

Which software would you use in my case? Are my arguments for Python/NodeJS right? Which kind of database would you use?

Thank you for your answer!

Node.js JavaScript Django Python

See more
Node.js logo

Node.js

29K
23K
7.9K
29K
23K
+ 1
7.9K
A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
Node.js logo
Node.js
VS
JHipster logo
JHipster

related Node.js posts

Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 33 upvotes · 162.3K views
atStreamStream
Go
Go
Stream
Stream
Python
Python
Yarn
Yarn
Babel
Babel
Node.js
Node.js
ES6
ES6
JavaScript
JavaScript
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times · | 27 upvotes · 255.2K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
Kafka
Kafka
Node.js
Node.js
GraphQL
GraphQL
Apollo
Apollo
React
React
PHP
PHP
MySQL
MySQL

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

See more
ASP.NET logo

ASP.NET

12.9K
273
0
12.9K
273
+ 1
0
An open source web framework for building modern web apps and services with .NET
    Be the first to leave a pro
    ASP.NET logo
    ASP.NET
    VS
    JHipster logo
    JHipster

    related ASP.NET posts

    Greg Neumann
    Greg Neumann
    Indie, Solo, Developer · | 6 upvotes · 34.6K views
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Electron
    Electron
    Quasar Framework
    Quasar Framework
    ASP.NET
    ASP.NET
    Xamarin Forms
    Xamarin Forms
    .NET Core
    .NET Core
    Xamarin
    Xamarin

    Finding the most effective dev stack for a solo developer. Over the past year, I've been looking at many tech stacks that would be 'best' for me, as a solo, indie, developer to deliver a desktop app (Windows & Mac) plus mobile - iOS mainly. Initially, Xamarin started to stand-out. Using .NET Core as the run-time, Xamarin as the native API provider and Xamarin Forms for the UI seemed to solve all issues. But, the cracks soon started to appear. Xamarin Forms is mobile only; the Windows incarnation is different. There is no Mac UI solution (you have to code it natively in Mac OS Storyboard. I was also worried how Xamarin Forms , if I was to use it, was going to cope, in future, with Apple's new SwiftUI and Google's new Fuchsia.

    This plethora of techs for the UI-layer made me reach for the safer waters of using Web-techs for the UI. Lovely! Consistency everywhere (well, mostly). But that consistency evaporates when platform issues are addressed. There are so many web frameworks!

    But, I made a simple decision. It's just me...I am clever, but there is no army of coders here. And I have big plans for a business app. How could just 1 developer go-on to deploy a decent app to Windows, iPhone, iPad & Mac OS? I remembered earlier days when I've used Microsoft's ASP.NET to scaffold - generate - loads of Code for a web-app that I needed for several charities that I worked with. What 'generators' exist that do a lot of the platform-specific rubbish, allow the necessary customisation of such platform integration and provide a decent UI?

    I've placed my colours to the Quasar Framework mast. Oh dear, that means Electron desktop apps doesn't it? Well, Ive had enough of loads of Developers saying that "the menus won't look native" or "it uses too much RAM" and so on. I've been using non-native UI-wrapped apps for ages - the date picker in Outlook on iOS is way better than the native date-picker and I'd been using it for years without getting hot under the collar about it. Developers do get so hung-up on things that busy Users hardly notice; don't you think?. As to the RAM usage issue; that's a bit true. But Users only really notice when an app uses so much RAM that the machine starts to page-out. Electron contributes towards that horizon but does not cause it. My Users will be business-users after all. Somewhat decent machines.

    Looking forward to all that lovely Vue.js around my TypeScript and all those really, really, b e a u t I f u l UI controls of Quasar Framework . Still not sure that 1 dev can deliver all that... but I'm up for trying...

    See more
    ASP.NET
    ASP.NET
    Puppeteer
    Puppeteer
    vuex
    vuex
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    React
    React
    Angular 2
    Angular 2
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Netlify
    Netlify
    Heroku
    Heroku
    #Seo
    #Heroku

    I found Heroku to be a great option to get ExpressJS up and running with very little hustle. The free tier is great, but I'd recommend to set up a cronjob to visit your site every few minutes so that the server stays awake. Netlify was the option to host the front-end because doing the server side rendering on #Heroku would have taken a little more time than I'd like to. For the moment pre-rendering the app with prerender-spa-plugin is enough to help with #seo. Puppeteer was my choice over other options because it made it easier to scrape websites made on ASP.NET which is what I needed in this case. And Vue.js is my top choice at the moment because it's really beginner friendly and it has a lot of the features I like about Angular 2 and React. vuex is a must in most of the app I build.

    See more

    related Rails posts

    Zach Holman
    Zach Holman
    at Zach Holman · | 21 upvotes · 165K views
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Rails
    Rails
    Apollo
    Apollo
    React
    React

    Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

    But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

    But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

    Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

    See more
    Julien DeFrance
    Julien DeFrance
    Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail · | 16 upvotes · 267.5K views
    atSmartZipSmartZip
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Node.js
    Node.js
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    New Relic
    New Relic
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    Elasticsearch
    Elasticsearch
    Superset
    Superset
    Amazon Quicksight
    Amazon Quicksight
    Amazon Redshift
    Amazon Redshift
    Zapier
    Zapier
    Segment
    Segment
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon CloudFront
    Memcached
    Memcached
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    Docker
    Docker
    Capistrano
    Capistrano
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    Rails API
    Rails API
    Rails
    Rails
    Algolia
    Algolia

    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

    Future improvements / technology decisions included:

    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

    See more

    related Laravel posts

    Epistol
    Epistol
    PHP
    PHP
    Bulma
    Bulma
    Asana
    Asana
    Stripe
    Stripe
    Let's Encrypt
    Let's Encrypt
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare
    Deployer
    Deployer
    Git
    Git
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    nginx
    nginx
    Buddy
    Buddy
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript