Alternatives to Laravel logo

Alternatives to Laravel

Symfony, CodeIgniter, Django, CakePHP, and Rails are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Laravel.
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What is Laravel and what are its top alternatives?

It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.
Laravel is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
Laravel is an open source tool with 65.6K GitHub stars and 21K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Laravel's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Laravel

  • Symfony

    Symfony

    It is written with speed and flexibility in mind. It allows developers to build better and easy to maintain websites with PHP.. ...

  • CodeIgniter

    CodeIgniter

    CodeIgniter is a proven, agile & open PHP web application framework with a small footprint. It is powering the next generation of web apps. ...

  • Django

    Django

    Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. ...

  • CakePHP

    CakePHP

    It makes building web applications simpler, faster, while requiring less code. A modern PHP 7 framework offering a flexible database access layer and a powerful scaffolding system. ...

  • Rails

    Rails

    Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern. ...

  • WordPress

    WordPress

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family. ...

  • Lumen

    Lumen

    Laravel Lumen is a stunningly fast PHP micro-framework for building web applications with expressive, elegant syntax. We believe development must be an enjoyable, creative experience to be truly fulfilling. Lumen attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as routing, database abstraction, queueing, and caching. ...

  • PHP

    PHP

    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world. ...

Laravel alternatives & related posts

Symfony logo

Symfony

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3.9K
1K
A PHP full-stack web framework
5.2K
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PROS OF SYMFONY
  • 168
    Open source
  • 140
    Php
  • 122
    Community
  • 122
    Dependency injection
  • 114
    Professional
  • 74
    Doctrine
  • 66
    Organized
  • 62
    Modular architecture
  • 42
    Smart programming
  • 38
    Solid
  • 14
    Documentation
  • 11
    LTS releases
  • 6
    Robust
  • 6
    Easy to Learn
  • 5
    Bundle
  • 5
    Good practices guideline
  • 5
    Decoupled framework components
  • 4
    Simple
  • 4
    Service container
  • 2
    Powerful
  • 1
    Flexible
CONS OF SYMFONY
  • 9
    Too many dependency
  • 7
    Lot of config files
  • 3
    YMAL
  • 2
    Feature creep
  • 1
    Bloated

related Symfony posts

Benjamin Bernard-Bouissières
Web Developer at ipexia · | 15 upvotes · 227K views

I really love Django because it is really fast to create a web application from scratch and it has a lot a facilities like the ORM or the Admin module ! The Python language is really easy to read and powerful, that's why I prefer Django over Symfony.

I use Django at work to make tools for the technicians but I also use it for me to build my personal website which I host on PythonAnywhere, and with a domain name bought on Namecheap.

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Samuel Webster
Principal Developer at Colart · | 7 upvotes · 198K views

We needed our e-commerce platform (built using WooCommerce) to be able to keep products in sync with our #pim (provided by #akeneo) which is built in Symfony . We hooked into the kernel.event_listener to send RabbitMQ messages to a WordPress API endpoint that triggers the updated product to rebuild with fresh data.

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CodeIgniter logo

CodeIgniter

3K
1.3K
433
A Fully Baked PHP Framework
3K
1.3K
+ 1
433
PROS OF CODEIGNITER
  • 84
    Mvc
  • 75
    Easy setup
  • 68
    Open source
  • 60
    Well documented
  • 35
    Community support
  • 22
    Easy to learn
  • 18
    Easy
  • 12
    Fast
  • 10
    HMVC
  • 8
    Language Suppert
  • 7
    "Fast","Easy","MVC"
  • 5
    Powerful
  • 5
    Easy, fast and full functional
  • 4
    I think it is best. we can make all types of project
  • 4
    Works on Every PHP Server like shared hostings
  • 4
    Open source, Easy to setup
  • 3
    Beginner friendly framework
  • 3
    Customizable
  • 3
    Super Lightweight, Super Easy to Learn
  • 2
    CLI
  • 1
    Easily Extensible
CONS OF CODEIGNITER
  • 5
    No ORM
  • 1
    No CLI

related CodeIgniter posts

Saikat Chakrabortty
Shared insights
on
PHP
Laravel
CodeIgniter

I have used PHP to do end to end developments , using Laravel CodeIgniter frameworks.

See more
Narjis Fatima
Web developer at WebSolution Creators · | 2 upvotes · 5.8K views
Shared insights
on
Django
CodeIgniter
Python

I have learned Python. I also developed an online Result management system in CodeIgniter for my school but now want to migrate to Django as the system is expanding. Is it a good idea?

See more
Django logo

Django

23.9K
20.7K
3.6K
The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
23.9K
20.7K
+ 1
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PROS OF DJANGO
  • 619
    Rapid development
  • 459
    Open source
  • 394
    Great community
  • 344
    Easy to learn
  • 256
    Mvc
  • 208
    Beautiful code
  • 207
    Elegant
  • 187
    Free
  • 186
    Great packages
  • 173
    Great libraries
  • 63
    Restful
  • 60
    Powerful
  • 59
    Comes with auth and crud admin panel
  • 55
    Great documentation
  • 52
    Great for web
  • 41
    Python
  • 35
    Great orm
  • 31
    Great for api
  • 24
    All included
  • 20
    Web Apps
  • 19
    Fast
  • 16
    Used by top startups
  • 14
    Clean
  • 13
    Sexy
  • 12
    Easy setup
  • 10
    Convention over configuration
  • 7
    ORM
  • 7
    Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
  • 7
    The Django community
  • 5
    Its elegant and practical
  • 5
    Great MVC and templating engine
  • 4
    Full stack
  • 4
    Mvt
  • 4
    Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
  • 4
    Fast prototyping
  • 4
    Easy to develop end to end AI Models
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Easy to use
  • 3
    King of backend world
  • 3
    Cross-Platform
  • 3
    Batteries included
  • 3
    Have not found anything that it can't do
  • 2
    Scaffold
  • 2
    Zero code burden to change databases
  • 2
    Full-Text Search
  • 2
    Map
  • 2
    Modular
  • 2
    Very quick to get something up and running
  • 2
    Many libraries
  • 2
    Python community
  • 2
    Great peformance
  • 2
    Just the right level of abstraction
  • 1
    Easy to change database manager
CONS OF DJANGO
  • 24
    Underpowered templating
  • 19
    Underpowered ORM
  • 18
    Autoreload restarts whole server
  • 15
    URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
  • 10
    Internal subcomponents coupling
  • 7
    Not nodejs
  • 7
    Admin
  • 6
    Configuration hell
  • 3
    Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
  • 3
    Bloated admin panel included
  • 3
    Python
  • 2
    Overwhelming folder structure
  • 2
    Not typed
  • 1
    InEffective Multithreading

related Django posts

Dmitry Mukhin

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

See more

Hey, so I developed a basic application with Python. But to use it, you need a python interpreter. I want to add a GUI to make it more appealing. What should I choose to develop a GUI? I have very basic skills in front end development (CSS, JavaScript). I am fluent in python. I'm looking for a tool that is easy to use and doesn't require too much code knowledge. I have recently tried out Flask, but it is kinda complicated. Should I stick with it, move to Django, or is there another nice framework to use?

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CakePHP logo

CakePHP

585
345
137
The Rapid Development Framework for PHP
585
345
+ 1
137
PROS OF CAKEPHP
  • 35
    Open source
  • 25
    Really rapid framework
  • 19
    Good code organization
  • 13
    Flexibility
  • 10
    Security best practices
  • 7
    Clean architecture
  • 5
    ORM
  • 5
    Less code
  • 4
    Composer friendly
  • 4
    Convention Over Configuration
  • 2
    CakePhp Book
  • 2
    Cake Bake
  • 2
    Built-in Validation
  • 1
    Ctp view File extension
  • 1
    CakePhp inflector
  • 1
    Quickly develop
  • 1
    Rest Full Apis
CONS OF CAKEPHP
  • 1
    Robust Baking Tool
  • 1
    Follows Good Programming Practices

related CakePHP posts

Rails logo

Rails

14.5K
9.9K
5.4K
Web development that doesn't hurt
14.5K
9.9K
+ 1
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PROS OF RAILS
  • 847
    Rapid development
  • 648
    Great gems
  • 604
    Great community
  • 479
    Convention over configuration
  • 416
    Mvc
  • 349
    Great for web
  • 344
    Beautiful code
  • 311
    Open source
  • 270
    Great libraries
  • 260
    Active record
  • 105
    Elegant
  • 88
    Easy to learn
  • 86
    Easy Database Migrations
  • 78
    Makes you happy
  • 73
    Free
  • 62
    Great routing
  • 53
    Has everything you need to get the job done
  • 41
    Great Data Modeling
  • 38
    Beautiful
  • 38
    MVC - Easy to start on
  • 35
    Easy setup
  • 26
    Great caching
  • 25
    Ultra rapid development time
  • 22
    It's super easy
  • 17
    Great Resources
  • 16
    Easy to build mockups that work
  • 14
    Less Boilerplate
  • 7
    Developer Friendly
  • 7
    API Development
  • 6
    Great documentation
  • 5
    Easy REST API creation
  • 5
    Quick
  • 4
    Great language
  • 4
    Intuitive
  • 4
    Haml and sass
  • 4
    Easy to learn, use, improvise and update
  • 2
    It works
  • 2
    Jet packs come standard
  • 2
    Easy and fast
  • 2
    Legacy
  • 2
    Metaprogramming
  • 1
    Convention over configuration
  • 1
    Easy Testing
  • 1
    Cancan
  • 1
    It's intuitive
CONS OF RAILS
  • 20
    Too much "magic" (hidden behavior)
  • 13
    Poor raw performance
  • 11
    Asset system is too primitive and outdated
  • 6
    Bloat in models
  • 6
    Heavy use of mixins
  • 3
    Very Very slow

related Rails posts

Zach Holman

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 29 upvotes · 1.4M views

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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WordPress logo

WordPress

78.5K
23.9K
2K
A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability.
78.5K
23.9K
+ 1
2K
PROS OF WORDPRESS
  • 408
    Customizable
  • 359
    Easy to manage
  • 349
    Plugins & themes
  • 258
    Non-tech colleagues can update website content
  • 245
    Really powerful
  • 143
    Rapid website development
  • 76
    Best documentation
  • 50
    Codex
  • 43
    Product feature set
  • 34
    Custom/internal social network
  • 13
    Open source
  • 7
    Great for all types of websites
  • 5
    Huge install and user base
  • 4
    It's simple and easy to use by any novice
  • 4
    Most websites make use of it
  • 4
    Open Source Community
  • 4
    Perfect example of user collaboration
  • 4
    Best
  • 3
    I like it like I like a kick in the groin
  • 3
    Community
  • 3
    API-based CMS
  • 2
    Easy To use
  • 1
    <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>
CONS OF WORDPRESS
  • 11
    Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
  • 10
    Plugins are of mixed quality
  • 8
    Not best backend UI
  • 1
    Complex Organization
  • 1
    Great Security

related WordPress posts

Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 893K views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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Siddhant Sharma
Tech Connoisseur at Channelize.io · | 12 upvotes · 737.5K views

WordPress Magento PHP Java Swift JavaScript

Back in the days, we started looking for a date on different matrimonial websites as there were no Dating Applications. We used to create different profiles. It all changed in 2012 when Tinder, an Online Dating application came into India Market.

Tinder allowed us to communicate with our potential soul mates. That too without paying any extra money. I too got 4-6 matches in 6 years. It changed the life of many Millennials. Tinder created a revolution of its own. P.S. - I still don't have a date :(

Posting my first article. Please have a look and do give feedback.

Communication InAppChat Dating Matrimonial #messaging

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Lumen logo

Lumen

357
524
152
The stunningly fast PHP micro-framework by Laravel
357
524
+ 1
152
PROS OF LUMEN
  • 33
    API
  • 25
    Microframework
  • 19
    MVC
  • 16
    PHP
  • 12
    Open source
  • 11
    Eloquent
  • 10
    Restful & fast framework
  • 7
    Illuminate support
  • 7
    Composer
  • 4
    Brother of laravel and fast
  • 4
    Easy to learn
  • 4
    Fast
CONS OF LUMEN
  • 3
    Not fast
  • 2
    PHP
  • 1
    Not fast with MongoDB

related Lumen posts

Tassanai Singprom

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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Aimad Quouninich

Hello everyone,

I have a final-study project, and I'm responsible for making decisions for what frameworks to use (both front-end and back-end) and the software architecture to adapt.

The project is a web application for a concrete company. The main goal is to calculate what is called OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness), meaning simply the efficiency of the machine. The calculation and display of OEE will be in real-time, meaning that this rate will be updated every two minutes, and it will appear in a graph. Also, we have the state of the machines to display whether the machines are working just fine or there is some problem.

This will be done using IoT, meaning that important data will be sent from the machine to the web application that I will create via the API (someone else will be responsible for this matter). Of course, the application will include employees, factories, as well as machines, ... etc.

The most important thing in the application is real-time performance monitoring of machines and the OEE.

A real example of what we want to do => https://evocon.com/

I choose to use Laravel because : - This type of applications could be implemented by Laravel - Me and my colleague have some knowledge and practice with this framework (choosing other technologies like Node.js means a huge learning curve) - Easy documentation and abandon tutorials

The only reason why I choose Vue.js because It goes well with Laravel (from what I have learned).

The second important question, which software architecture should I adapt ? should I use Microservice Architecture or the normal and well-known Monolithic Architecture? I know the benefits and disadvantages of the first and second methods, but I do not want to make a wrong decision.

If I choose microservice for this project, I will use Lumen (PHP Micro-Framework By Laravel).

Should I use micro-frontend as well? Like VuMS, or it's not necessary for this project?

I don't think that the reasons to choose Laravel are enough, so I want to understand the obstacles that I may face during the development.

In the end, I decided to ask and take expert opinions.

NOTE: this web application will be used by other companies, like in the case of evocon.

If there are tips and things that I must know to accomplish this project, please mention them.

Thank you very much.

See more
PHP logo

PHP

104.8K
49.6K
4.5K
A popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development
104.8K
49.6K
+ 1
4.5K
PROS OF PHP
  • 941
    Large community
  • 805
    Open source
  • 757
    Easy deployment
  • 481
    Great frameworks
  • 384
    The best glue on the web
  • 233
    Continual improvements
  • 181
    Good old web
  • 141
    Web foundation
  • 132
    Community packages
  • 123
    Tool support
  • 33
    Used by wordpress
  • 31
    Excellent documentation
  • 26
    Used by Facebook
  • 23
    Because of Symfony
  • 19
    Dynamic Language
  • 14
    Awesome Language and easy to implement
  • 14
    Cheap hosting
  • 14
    Very powerful web language
  • 13
    Fast development
  • 10
    Flexibility, syntax, extensibility
  • 10
    Because of Laravel
  • 10
    Easy to learn
  • 10
    Composer
  • 8
    Easiest deployment
  • 7
    Fastestest Time to Version 1.0 Deployments
  • 7
    Readable Code
  • 7
    Short development lead times
  • 7
    Worst popularity quality ratio
  • 6
    Fast
  • 6
    Most of the web uses it
  • 6
    Faster then ever
  • 5
    Open source and large community
  • 5
    Simple, flexible yet Scalable
  • 4
    Cheap to own
  • 4
    Is like one zip of air
  • 4
    Easy to learn, a big community, lot of frameworks
  • 4
    I have no choice :(
  • 4
    Has the best ecommerce(Magento,Prestashop,Opencart,etc)
  • 4
    Easy to use and learn
  • 4
    Large community, easy setup, easy deployment, framework
  • 4
    Open source and great framework
  • 3
    Great developer experience
  • 2
    Used by STOMT
  • 2
    Fault tolerance
  • 2
    Great flexibility. From fast prototyping to large apps
  • 2
    Interpreted at the run time
  • 2
    FFI
  • 2
    Walk away
  • 2
    Hard not to use
  • 2
    Safe the planet
CONS OF PHP
  • 19
    So easy to learn, good practices are hard to find
  • 16
    Inconsistent API
  • 8
    Fragmented community
  • 5
    Not secure
  • 2
    No routing system
  • 1
    Hard to debug
  • 1
    Old

related PHP posts

Nick Rockwell
SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 42 upvotes · 1.6M views

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 24 upvotes · 1.7M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
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