Alternatives to MongoDB Stitch logo

Alternatives to MongoDB Stitch

Firebase, Atlas, MongoDB Atlas, AWS Lambda, and Heroku are the most popular alternatives and competitors to MongoDB Stitch.
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What is MongoDB Stitch and what are its top alternatives?

MongoDB Stitch lets developers focus on building applications rather than on managing data manipulation code, service integration, or backend infrastructure. Stitch lets you focus on building the app users want, not on writing boilerplate backend logic.
MongoDB Stitch is a tool in the Platform as a Service category of a tech stack.

MongoDB Stitch alternatives & related posts

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Fontumi focuses on the development of telecommunications solutions. We have opted for technologies that allow agile development and great scalability.

Firebase and Node.js + FeathersJS are technologies that we have used on the server side. Vue.js is our main framework for clients.

Our latest products launched have been focused on the integration of AI systems for enriched conversations. Google Compute Engine , along with Dialogflow and Cloud Firestore have been important tools for this work.

Git + GitHub + Visual Studio Code is a killer stack.

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In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

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Atlas logo

Atlas

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    We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

    There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

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    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 12 upvotes · 21.1K views
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    Database is at the heart of any technology stack. It is no wonder we spend a lot of time choosing the right database before we dive deep into product building.

    When we were faced with the question of what database to choose, we set the following criteria: The database must (1) Have a very high transaction throughput. We wanted to err on the side of "reads" but not on the "writes". (2) be flexible. I.e. be adaptive enough to take - in data variations. Since we are an early-stage start-up, not everything is set in stone. (3) Fast & easy to work with (4) Cloud Native. We did not want to spend our time in "ANY" infrastructure management.

    Based on the above, we picked PostgreSQL and MongoDB for evaluation. We tried a few iterations on hardening the data model with PostgreSQL, but realised that we can move much faster by loosely defining the schema (with just a few fundamental principles intact).

    Thus we switched to MongoDB. Before diving in, we validated a few core principles such as: (1) Transaction guarantee. Until 3.6, MongoDB supports Transaction guarantee at Document level. From 4.0 onwards, you can achieve transaction guarantee across multiple documents.

    (2) Primary Keys & Indexing: Like any RDBMS, MongoDB supports unique keys & indexes to ensure data integrity & search ability

    (3) Ability to join data across data sets: MongoDB offers a super-rich aggregate framework that enables one to filter and group data

    (4) Concurrency handling: MongoDB offers specific operations (such as findOneAndUpdate), which when coupled with Optimistic Locking, can be used to achieve concurrency.

    Above all, MongoDB offers a complete no-frills Cloud Database as a service - MongoDB Atlas. This kind of sealed the deal for us.

    Looking back, choosing MongoDB with MongoDB Atlas was one of the best decisions we took and it is serving us well. My only gripe is that there must be a way to scale-up or scale-down the Atlas configuration at different parts of the day with minimal downtime.

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    AWS Lambda logo

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    Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

    We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

    Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

    We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

    We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

    In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

    Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

    In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

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    Julien DeFrance
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    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

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    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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    Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

    We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

    Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

    Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

    • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
    • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
    • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
    • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
    • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

    In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

    1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
    2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
    3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
    4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

    Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

    What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

    Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

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    Russel Werner
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    Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

    #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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    So, the shift from Amazon EC2 to Google App Engine and generally #AWS to #GCP was a long decision and in the end, it's one that we've taken with eyes open and that we reserve the right to modify at any time. And to be clear, we continue to do a lot of stuff with AWS. But, by default, the content of the decision was, for our consumer-facing products, we're going to use GCP first. And if there's some reason why we don't think that's going to work out great, then we'll happily use AWS. In practice, that hasn't really happened. We've been able to meet almost 100% of our needs in GCP.

    So it's basically mostly Google Kubernetes Engine , we're mostly running stuff on Kubernetes right now.

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    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

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    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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    We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

    In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

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    When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

    So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

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    The central file that manages this would be a generated file. Since the list of possible sections is quite large (~50 sections today for Search), it also presumes we have a sane mechanism for lazy-loading components with server rendering, which is a topic for another post. Suffice it to say, we do not need to package all possible sections in a massive bundle to account for everything up front.

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    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

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    Deploy and scale modern websites and web apps in seconds
    Azure Websites logo
    Azure Websites
    VS
    MongoDB Stitch logo
    MongoDB Stitch
    Dokku logo

    Dokku

    100
    90
    58
    100
    90
    + 1
    58
    Docker powered mini-Heroku in around 100 lines of Bash
    Dokku logo
    Dokku
    VS
    MongoDB Stitch logo
    MongoDB Stitch
    Cloud Foundry logo

    Cloud Foundry

    84
    108
    4
    84
    108
    + 1
    4
    Deploy and scale applications in seconds on your choice of private or public cloud
    Cloud Foundry logo
    Cloud Foundry
    VS
    MongoDB Stitch logo
    MongoDB Stitch
    Apache Camel logo

    Apache Camel

    64
    23
    2
    64
    23
    + 1
    2
    A versatile open source integration framework
    Apache Camel logo
    Apache Camel
    VS
    MongoDB Stitch logo
    MongoDB Stitch
    jFrog logo

    jFrog

    50
    9
    0
    50
    9
    + 1
    0
    Universal Artifact Management
      Be the first to leave a pro
      jFrog logo
      jFrog
      VS
      MongoDB Stitch logo
      MongoDB Stitch
      Azure App Service logo

      Azure App Service

      47
      18
      0
      47
      18
      + 1
      0
      Build, deploy, and scale web apps on a fully managed platform
        Be the first to leave a pro
        Azure App Service logo
        Azure App Service
        VS
        MongoDB Stitch logo
        MongoDB Stitch
        PythonAnywhere logo

        PythonAnywhere

        45
        64
        19
        45
        64
        + 1
        19
        Micro PaaS for Python web apps. Develop and host Python from your browser
        PythonAnywhere logo
        PythonAnywhere
        VS
        MongoDB Stitch logo
        MongoDB Stitch
        Envoyer logo

        Envoyer

        38
        24
        2
        38
        24
        + 1
        2
        A brand new way to deploy PHP and Laravel applications with zero downtime
        Envoyer logo
        Envoyer
        VS
        MongoDB Stitch logo
        MongoDB Stitch
        Hasura logo

        Hasura

        37
        54
        3
        37
        54
        + 1
        3
        An open source GraphQL engine that deploys instant, realtime GraphQL APIs on any Postgres database.
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        Hasura
        VS
        MongoDB Stitch logo
        MongoDB Stitch