Alternatives to RuboCop logo

Alternatives to RuboCop

Reek, Brakeman, SonarQube, RSpec, and ESLint are the most popular alternatives and competitors to RuboCop.
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What is RuboCop and what are its top alternatives?

RuboCop is a Ruby static code analyzer. Out of the box it will enforce many of the guidelines outlined in the community Ruby Style Guide.
RuboCop is a tool in the Code Review category of a tech stack.
RuboCop is an open source tool with 11.5K GitHub stars and 2.8K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to RuboCop's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to RuboCop

  • Reek

    Reek

    Reek is a tool that examines Ruby classes, modules, and methods and reports any Code Smells it finds. ...

  • Brakeman

    Brakeman

    Free static analysis security tool for Ruby on Rails. Zero-setup security scans for Rails applications based on source code analysis. ...

  • SonarQube

    SonarQube

    SonarQube provides an overview of the overall health of your source code and even more importantly, it highlights issues found on new code. With a Quality Gate set on your project, you will simply fix the Leak and start mechanically improving. ...

  • RSpec

    RSpec

    Behaviour Driven Development for Ruby. Making TDD Productive and Fun.

  • ESLint

    ESLint

    A pluggable and configurable linter tool for identifying and reporting on patterns in JavaScript. Maintain your code quality with ease. ...

  • Prettier

    Prettier

    Prettier is an opinionated code formatter. It enforces a consistent style by parsing your code and re-printing it with its own rules that take the maximum line length into account, wrapping code when necessary. ...

  • Code Climate

    Code Climate

    After each Git push, Code Climate analyzes your code for complexity, duplication, and common smells to determine changes in quality and surface technical debt hotspots. ...

  • TSLint

    TSLint

    An extensible static analysis tool that checks TypeScript code for readability, maintainability, and functionality errors. It is widely supported across modern editors & build systems and can be customized with your own lint rules, configurations, and formatters. ...

RuboCop alternatives & related posts

Reek logo

Reek

9
17
0
Code smell detector for Ruby
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+ 1
0
PROS OF REEK
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      Brakeman logo

      Brakeman

      40
      23
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      A static analysis security vulnerability scanner for Ruby on Rails applications
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      PROS OF BRAKEMAN
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          Jerome Dalbert
          Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 5 upvotes · 434.6K views

          The continuous integration process for our Rails backend app starts by opening a GitHub pull request. This triggers a CircleCI build and some Code Climate checks.

          The CircleCI build is a workflow that runs the following jobs:

          • check for security vulnerabilities with Brakeman
          • check code quality with RuboCop
          • run RSpec tests in parallel with the knapsack gem, and output test coverage reports with the simplecov gem
          • upload test coverage to Code Climate

          Code Climate checks the following:

          • code quality metrics like code complexity
          • test coverage minimum thresholds

          The CircleCI jobs and Code Climate checks above have corresponding GitHub status checks.

          Once all the mandatory GitHub checks pass and the code+functionality have been reviewed, developers can merge their pull request into our Git master branch. Code is then ready to deploy!

          #ContinuousIntegration

          See more
          SonarQube logo

          SonarQube

          1.2K
          1.4K
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          Continuous Code Quality
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          PROS OF SONARQUBE
          • 19
            Tracks code complexity and smell trends
          • 12
            IDE Integration
          • 7
            Complete code Review
          CONS OF SONARQUBE
          • 5
            Sales process is long and unfriendly
          • 4
            Paid support is poor, techs arrogant and unhelpful

          related SonarQube posts

          Simon Reymann
          Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

          Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

          • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
          • Respectively Git as revision control system
          • SourceTree as Git GUI
          • Visual Studio Code as IDE
          • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
          • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
          • SonarQube as quality gate
          • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
          • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
          • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
          • Heroku for deploying in test environments
          • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
          • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
          • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
          • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
          • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

          The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

          • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
          • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
          • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
          • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
          • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
          • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
          See more
          Ganesa Vijayakumar
          Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 19 upvotes · 2.4M views

          I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

          I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

          As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

          UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

          Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

          Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

          Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

          Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

          Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

          Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

          Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

          Thanks, Ganesa

          See more
          RSpec logo

          RSpec

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          Behaviour Driven Development for Ruby
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              I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

              We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

              Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

              We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

              Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

              See more
              Simon Bettison
              Managing Director at Bettison.org Limited · | 7 upvotes · 290.4K views

              In 2010 we made the very difficult decision to entirely re-engineer our existing monolithic LAMP application from the ground up in order to address some growing concerns about it's long term viability as a platform.

              Full application re-write is almost always never the answer, because of the risks involved. However the situation warranted drastic action as it was clear that the existing product was going to face severe scaling issues. We felt it better address these sooner rather than later and also take the opportunity to improve the international architecture and also to refactor the database in. order that it better matched the changes in core functionality.

              PostgreSQL was chosen for its reputation as being solid ACID compliant database backend, it was available as an offering AWS RDS service which reduced the management overhead of us having to configure it ourselves. In order to reduce read load on the primary database we implemented an Elasticsearch layer for fast and scalable search operations. Synchronisation of these indexes was to be achieved through the use of Sidekiq's Redis based background workers on Amazon ElastiCache. Again the AWS solution here looked to be an easy way to keep our involvement in managing this part of the platform at a minimum. Allowing us to focus on our core business.

              Rails ls was chosen for its ability to quickly get core functionality up and running, its MVC architecture and also its focus on Test Driven Development using RSpec and Selenium with Travis CI providing continual integration. We also liked Ruby for its terse, clean and elegant syntax. Though YMMV on that one!

              Unicorn was chosen for its continual deployment and reputation as a reliable application server, nginx for its reputation as a fast and stable reverse-proxy. We also took advantage of the Amazon CloudFront CDN here to further improve performance by caching static assets globally.

              We tried to strike a balance between having control over management and configuration of our core application with the convenience of being able to leverage AWS hosted services for ancillary functions (Amazon SES , Amazon SQS Amazon Route 53 all hosted securely inside Amazon VPC of course!).

              Whilst there is some compromise here with potential vendor lock in, the tasks being performed by these ancillary services are no particularly specialised which should mitigate this risk. Furthermore we have already containerised the stack in our development using Docker environment, and looking to how best to bring this into production - potentially using Amazon EC2 Container Service

              See more
              ESLint logo

              ESLint

              12.8K
              8.3K
              23
              The fully pluggable JavaScript code quality tool
              12.8K
              8.3K
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              23
              PROS OF ESLINT
              • 7
                Consistent javascript - opinions don't matter anymore
              • 5
                IDE Integration
              • 4
                Free
              • 3
                Customizable
              • 2
                Focuses code review on quality not style
              • 2
                Broad ecosystem of support & users
              CONS OF ESLINT
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                related ESLint posts

                Simon Reymann
                Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

                Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

                • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
                • Respectively Git as revision control system
                • SourceTree as Git GUI
                • Visual Studio Code as IDE
                • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
                • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
                • SonarQube as quality gate
                • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
                • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
                • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
                • Heroku for deploying in test environments
                • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
                • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
                • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
                • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
                • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

                The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

                • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
                • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
                • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
                • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
                • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
                • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
                See more
                Johnny Bell

                So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

                So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

                The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

                I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

                Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

                I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

                See more
                Prettier logo

                Prettier

                1.3K
                436
                7
                Prettier is an opinionated code formatter.
                1.3K
                436
                + 1
                7
                PROS OF PRETTIER
                • 2
                  Customizable
                • 1
                  Atom/VSCode package
                • 1
                  Follows the Ruby Style Guide by default
                • 1
                  Runs offline
                • 1
                  Completely free
                • 1
                  Open Source
                CONS OF PRETTIER
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                  related Prettier posts

                  Simon Reymann
                  Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

                  Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

                  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
                  • Respectively Git as revision control system
                  • SourceTree as Git GUI
                  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
                  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
                  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
                  • SonarQube as quality gate
                  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
                  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
                  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
                  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
                  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
                  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
                  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
                  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
                  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

                  The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

                  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
                  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
                  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
                  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
                  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
                  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
                  See more
                  Johnny Bell

                  So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

                  So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

                  The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

                  I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

                  Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

                  I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

                  See more
                  Code Climate logo

                  Code Climate

                  499
                  439
                  276
                  Automated Ruby Code Review
                  499
                  439
                  + 1
                  276
                  PROS OF CODE CLIMATE
                  • 70
                    Auto sync with Github
                  • 49
                    Simple grade system that motivates to keep code clean
                  • 44
                    Better coding
                  • 29
                    Free for open source
                  • 21
                    Hotspots for quick refactoring candidates
                  • 15
                    Continued encouragement to a have better / cleaner code
                  • 13
                    Great UI
                  • 11
                    Makes you a better coder
                  • 10
                    Duplication Detection
                  • 5
                    Safe and Secure
                  • 2
                    Private
                  • 1
                    Locally Installable API
                  • 1
                    Uses rubocop
                  • 1
                    Extremely accurate in telling you the errors
                  • 1
                    GitHub only
                  • 1
                    Python inspection
                  • 1
                    great open community
                  • 1
                    GitHub integration, status inline in PRs
                  CONS OF CODE CLIMATE
                  • 1
                    Learning curve, static analysis comparable to eslint
                  • 1
                    Complains about small stylistic decisions

                  related Code Climate posts

                  Jerome Dalbert
                  Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 5 upvotes · 434.6K views

                  The continuous integration process for our Rails backend app starts by opening a GitHub pull request. This triggers a CircleCI build and some Code Climate checks.

                  The CircleCI build is a workflow that runs the following jobs:

                  • check for security vulnerabilities with Brakeman
                  • check code quality with RuboCop
                  • run RSpec tests in parallel with the knapsack gem, and output test coverage reports with the simplecov gem
                  • upload test coverage to Code Climate

                  Code Climate checks the following:

                  • code quality metrics like code complexity
                  • test coverage minimum thresholds

                  The CircleCI jobs and Code Climate checks above have corresponding GitHub status checks.

                  Once all the mandatory GitHub checks pass and the code+functionality have been reviewed, developers can merge their pull request into our Git master branch. Code is then ready to deploy!

                  #ContinuousIntegration

                  See more
                  TSLint logo

                  TSLint

                  457
                  184
                  0
                  An extensible linter for the TypeScript language
                  457
                  184
                  + 1
                  0
                  PROS OF TSLINT
                    Be the first to leave a pro
                    CONS OF TSLINT
                      Be the first to leave a con

                      related TSLint posts

                      Simon Reymann
                      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.1M views

                      Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

                      • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
                      • Respectively Git as revision control system
                      • SourceTree as Git GUI
                      • Visual Studio Code as IDE
                      • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
                      • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
                      • SonarQube as quality gate
                      • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
                      • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
                      • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
                      • Heroku for deploying in test environments
                      • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
                      • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
                      • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
                      • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
                      • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

                      The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

                      • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
                      • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
                      • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
                      • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
                      • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
                      • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
                      See more
                      Simon Reymann
                      Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 19 upvotes · 723.5K views

                      Our whole Vue.js frontend stack (incl. SSR) consists of the following tools:

                      • Nuxt.js consisting of Vue CLI, Vue Router, vuex, Webpack and Sass (Bundler for HTML5, CSS 3), Babel (Transpiler for JavaScript),
                      • Vue Styleguidist as our style guide and pool of developed Vue.js components
                      • Vuetify as Material Component Framework (for fast app development)
                      • TypeScript as programming language
                      • Apollo / GraphQL (incl. GraphiQL) for data access layer (https://apollo.vuejs.org/)
                      • ESLint, TSLint and Prettier for coding style and code analyzes
                      • Jest as testing framework
                      • Google Fonts and Font Awesome for typography and icon toolkit
                      • NativeScript-Vue for mobile development

                      The main reason we have chosen Vue.js over React and AngularJS is related to the following artifacts:

                      • Empowered HTML. Vue.js has many similar approaches with Angular. This helps to optimize HTML blocks handling with the use of different components.
                      • Detailed documentation. Vue.js has very good documentation which can fasten learning curve for developers.
                      • Adaptability. It provides a rapid switching period from other frameworks. It has similarities with Angular and React in terms of design and architecture.
                      • Awesome integration. Vue.js can be used for both building single-page applications and more difficult web interfaces of apps. Smaller interactive parts can be easily integrated into the existing infrastructure with no negative effect on the entire system.
                      • Large scaling. Vue.js can help to develop pretty large reusable templates.
                      • Tiny size. Vue.js weights around 20KB keeping its speed and flexibility. It allows reaching much better performance in comparison to other frameworks.
                      See more