Alternatives to Sandbox logo

Alternatives to Sandbox

Docker, Postman, Amazon API Gateway, Insomnia REST Client, and OpenAPI are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Sandbox.
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What is Sandbox and what are its top alternatives?

Quickly mock RESTful API or SOAP web-services with simple or dynamic responses, and fault injection to simulate real application behaviour.
Sandbox is a tool in the API Tools category of a tech stack.
Sandbox is an open source tool with 3 GitHub stars and 3 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Sandbox's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Sandbox

  • Docker

    Docker

    The Docker Platform is the industry-leading container platform for continuous, high-velocity innovation, enabling organizations to seamlessly build and share any application — from legacy to what comes next — and securely run them anywhere ...

  • Postman

    Postman

    It is the only complete API development environment, used by nearly five million developers and more than 100,000 companies worldwide. ...

  • Amazon API Gateway

    Amazon API Gateway

    Amazon API Gateway handles all the tasks involved in accepting and processing up to hundreds of thousands of concurrent API calls, including traffic management, authorization and access control, monitoring, and API version management. ...

  • Insomnia REST Client

    Insomnia REST Client

    Insomnia is a powerful REST API Client with cookie management, environment variables, code generation, and authentication for Mac, Window, and Linux. ...

  • OpenAPI

    OpenAPI

    It is a publicly available application programming interface that provides developers with programmatic access to a proprietary software application or web service. ...

  • Paw

    Paw

    Paw is a full-featured and beautifully designed Mac app that makes interaction with REST services delightful. Either you are an API maker or consumer, Paw helps you build HTTP requests, inspect the server's response and even generate client code. ...

  • OpenAPI Specification

    OpenAPI Specification

    It defines a standard, language-agnostic interface to RESTful APIs which allows both humans and computers to discover and understand the capabilities of the service without access to source code, documentation, or through network traffic inspection. ...

  • Apigee

    Apigee

    API management, design, analytics, and security are at the heart of modern digital architecture. The Apigee intelligent API platform is a complete solution for moving business to the digital world. ...

Sandbox alternatives & related posts

Docker logo

Docker

100.4K
79.4K
3.8K
Enterprise Container Platform for High-Velocity Innovation.
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PROS OF DOCKER
  • 821
    Rapid integration and build up
  • 688
    Isolation
  • 517
    Open source
  • 504
    Testa­bil­i­ty and re­pro­ducibil­i­ty
  • 459
    Lightweight
  • 217
    Standardization
  • 182
    Scalable
  • 105
    Upgrading / down­grad­ing / ap­pli­ca­tion versions
  • 86
    Security
  • 84
    Private paas environments
  • 33
    Portability
  • 25
    Limit resource usage
  • 15
    I love the way docker has changed virtualization
  • 15
    Game changer
  • 12
    Fast
  • 11
    Concurrency
  • 7
    Docker's Compose tools
  • 4
    Fast and Portable
  • 4
    Easy setup
  • 4
    Because its fun
  • 3
    Makes shipping to production very simple
  • 2
    It's dope
  • 1
    Highly useful
  • 1
    MacOS support FAKE
  • 1
    Its cool
  • 1
    Docker hub for the FTW
  • 1
    Very easy to setup integrate and build
  • 1
    Package the environment with the application
  • 1
    Does a nice job hogging memory
  • 1
    Open source and highly configurable
  • 1
    Simplicity, isolation, resource effective
CONS OF DOCKER
  • 7
    New versions == broken features
  • 4
    Documentation not always in sync
  • 3
    Moves quickly
  • 3
    Unreliable networking

related Docker posts

Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 2.6M views

Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

  • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
  • Respectively Git as revision control system
  • SourceTree as Git GUI
  • Visual Studio Code as IDE
  • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
  • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
  • SonarQube as quality gate
  • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
  • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
  • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
  • Heroku for deploying in test environments
  • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
  • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
  • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
  • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
  • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

  • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
  • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
  • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
  • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
  • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
  • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
See more
Tymoteusz Paul
Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 21 upvotes · 4.3M views

Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

See more
Postman logo

Postman

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44.3K
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Only complete API development environment
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PROS OF POSTMAN
  • 481
    Easy to use
  • 366
    Great tool
  • 274
    Makes developing rest api's easy peasy
  • 154
    Easy setup, looks good
  • 142
    The best api workflow out there
  • 53
    History feature
  • 53
    It's the best
  • 43
    Adds real value to my workflow
  • 41
    Great interface that magically predicts your needs
  • 34
    The best in class app
  • 10
    Can save and share script
  • 9
    Fully featured without looking cluttered
  • 7
    Collections
  • 6
    Global/Environment Variables
  • 6
    Shareable Collections
  • 6
    Dead simple and useful. Excellent
  • 6
    Dark theme easy on the eyes
  • 6
    Option to run scrips
  • 5
    Awesome customer support
  • 5
    Great integration with newman
  • 4
    The test script is useful
  • 3
    This has simplified my testing significantly
  • 3
    Easy as pie
  • 3
    Simple
  • 3
    Documentation
  • 3
    Makes testing API's as easy as 1,2,3
  • 3
    Saves responses
  • 2
    API-network
  • 2
    Mocking API calls with predefined response
  • 2
    I'd recommend it to everyone who works with apis
  • 1
    Pre-request Script and Test attributes are invaluable
  • 1
    Postman Runner CI Integration
  • 1
    Now supports GraphQL
  • 1
    Continuous integration using newman
  • 1
    Easy to setup, test and provides test storage
  • 1
    Graph
  • 0
    <a href="http://fixbit.com/">useful tool</a>
  • 0
    Runner
CONS OF POSTMAN
  • 8
    Stores credentials in HTTP
  • 7
    Poor GraphQL support
  • 6
    Bloated features and UI
  • 5
    Cumbersome to switch authentication tokens
  • 1
    Expensive
  • 1
    Can't prompt for per-request variables

related Postman posts

Noah Zoschke
Engineering Manager at Segment · | 30 upvotes · 1.9M views

We just launched the Segment Config API (try it out for yourself here) — a set of public REST APIs that enable you to manage your Segment configuration. A public API is only as good as its #documentation. For the API reference doc we are using Postman.

Postman is an “API development environment”. You download the desktop app, and build API requests by URL and payload. Over time you can build up a set of requests and organize them into a “Postman Collection”. You can generalize a collection with “collection variables”. This allows you to parameterize things like username, password and workspace_name so a user can fill their own values in before making an API call. This makes it possible to use Postman for one-off API tasks instead of writing code.

Then you can add Markdown content to the entire collection, a folder of related methods, and/or every API method to explain how the APIs work. You can publish a collection and easily share it with a URL.

This turns Postman from a personal #API utility to full-blown public interactive API documentation. The result is a great looking web page with all the API calls, docs and sample requests and responses in one place. Check out the results here.

Postman’s powers don’t end here. You can automate Postman with “test scripts” and have it periodically run a collection scripts as “monitors”. We now have #QA around all the APIs in public docs to make sure they are always correct

Along the way we tried other techniques for documenting APIs like ReadMe.io or Swagger UI. These required a lot of effort to customize.

Writing and maintaining a Postman collection takes some work, but the resulting documentation site, interactivity and API testing tools are well worth it.

See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 24 upvotes · 1.7M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
See more
Amazon API Gateway logo

Amazon API Gateway

1.1K
799
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Create, publish, maintain, monitor, and secure APIs at any scale
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PROS OF AMAZON API GATEWAY
  • 35
    AWS Integration
  • 4
    Websockets
CONS OF AMAZON API GATEWAY
  • 1
    No websocket broadcast
  • 1
    Less expensive

related Amazon API Gateway posts

A Luthra
VP Software Engrg at Reliant · | 2 upvotes · 288K views
Shared insights
on
Apigee
Amazon API Gateway

Amazon API Gateway vs Apigee. How do they compare as an API Gateway? What is the equivalent functionality, similarities, and differences moving from Apigee API GW to AWS API GW?

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Insomnia REST Client logo

Insomnia REST Client

509
420
34
The most intuitive cross-platform REST API Client 😴
509
420
+ 1
34
PROS OF INSOMNIA REST CLIENT
  • 14
    Easy to work with
  • 9
    Great user interface
  • 5
    Works with GraphQL
  • 2
    Preserves request templates
  • 2
    Opensource
  • 2
    Cross platform, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux
  • 0
    Does not have history feature
  • 0
    Vim and Emacs key map
CONS OF INSOMNIA REST CLIENT
  • 1
    Do not have team sharing options
  • 1
    Do not store credentials in HTTP

related Insomnia REST Client posts

Jason Barry
Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 4 upvotes · 1.8M views

We've tried a couple REST clients over the years, and Insomnia REST Client has won us over the most. Here's what we like about it compared to other contenders in this category:

  • Uncluttered UI. Things are only in your face when you need them, and the app is visually organized in an intuitive manner.
  • Native Mac app. We wanted the look and feel to be on par with other apps in our OS rather than a web app / Electron app (cough Postman).
  • Easy team sync. Other apps have this too, but Insomnia's model best sets the "set and forget" mentality. Syncs are near instant and I'm always assured that I'm working on the latest version of API endpoints. Apps like Paw use a git-based approach to revision history, but I think this actually over-complicates the sync feature. For ensuring I'm always working on the latest version of something, I'd rather have the sync model be closer to Dropbox's than git's, and Insomnia is closer to Dropbox in that regard.

Some features like automatic public-facing documentation aren't supported, but we currently don't have any public APIs, so this didn't matter to us.

See more
OpenAPI logo

OpenAPI

255
224
0
Allows the owner of a network-accessible service to give universal access
255
224
+ 1
0
PROS OF OPENAPI
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF OPENAPI
      Be the first to leave a con

      related OpenAPI posts

      Joshua Dean Küpper
      CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 4 upvotes · 184.7K views

      We use Swagger Inspector in conjunction with our universal REST-API "Charon". Swagger Inspector makes testing edge-cases hassle-free and lets testing look easy. Swagger Inspector was also a great help to explore the Mojang-API, that we are dependent on, because it is the central repository for minecraft-account-data.

      We previously used Postman but decided to switch over to Swagger Inspector because it also integrated seamlessly into Swagger UI, which we use for displaying our OpenAPI specification of said REST-API.

      See more
      Paw logo

      Paw

      195
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      165
      The ultimate REST client for Mac
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      236
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      165
      PROS OF PAW
      • 46
        Great interface
      • 38
        Easy to use
      • 25
        More stable and performant than the others
      • 16
        Saves endpoints list for testing
      • 13
        Supports environment variables
      • 12
        Integrations
      • 9
        Multi-Dimension Environment Settings
      • 4
        Paste curl commands into Paw
      • 2
        Creates code for any language or framework
      CONS OF PAW
      • 3
        It's not free
      • 2
        MacOS Only

      related Paw posts

      Jason Barry
      Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 4 upvotes · 1.8M views

      We've tried a couple REST clients over the years, and Insomnia REST Client has won us over the most. Here's what we like about it compared to other contenders in this category:

      • Uncluttered UI. Things are only in your face when you need them, and the app is visually organized in an intuitive manner.
      • Native Mac app. We wanted the look and feel to be on par with other apps in our OS rather than a web app / Electron app (cough Postman).
      • Easy team sync. Other apps have this too, but Insomnia's model best sets the "set and forget" mentality. Syncs are near instant and I'm always assured that I'm working on the latest version of API endpoints. Apps like Paw use a git-based approach to revision history, but I think this actually over-complicates the sync feature. For ensuring I'm always working on the latest version of something, I'd rather have the sync model be closer to Dropbox's than git's, and Insomnia is closer to Dropbox in that regard.

      Some features like automatic public-facing documentation aren't supported, but we currently don't have any public APIs, so this didn't matter to us.

      See more
      OpenAPI Specification logo

      OpenAPI Specification

      180
      105
      6
      An API description format for REST APIs
      180
      105
      + 1
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      PROS OF OPENAPI SPECIFICATION
      • 3
        API Specification
      • 3
        API Documentation
      CONS OF OPENAPI SPECIFICATION
        Be the first to leave a con

        related OpenAPI Specification posts

        Apigee logo

        Apigee

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        Intelligent and complete API platform
        172
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        26
        PROS OF APIGEE
        • 10
          Highly scalable and secure API Management Platform
        • 5
          Quick jumpstart
        • 5
          Good documentation
        • 3
          Fast and adjustable caching
        • 3
          Easy to use
        CONS OF APIGEE
        • 6
          Expensive

        related Apigee posts

        A Luthra
        VP Software Engrg at Reliant · | 2 upvotes · 288K views
        Shared insights
        on
        Apigee
        Amazon API Gateway

        Amazon API Gateway vs Apigee. How do they compare as an API Gateway? What is the equivalent functionality, similarities, and differences moving from Apigee API GW to AWS API GW?

        See more