Alternatives to Sequelize logo

Alternatives to Sequelize

Marvel, Sequel, TypeORM, Mongoose, and Prisma are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Sequelize.
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What is Sequelize and what are its top alternatives?

Sequelize is a promise-based ORM for Node.js and io.js. It supports the dialects PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, SQLite and MSSQL and features solid transaction support, relations, read replication and more.
Sequelize is a tool in the Object Relational Mapper (ORM) category of a tech stack.
Sequelize is an open source tool with 24.7K GitHub stars and 3.8K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Sequelize's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Sequelize

  • Marvel

    Marvel

    A super simple tool that turns any image (including PSDs) or sketch into interactive prototypes for any device. Powered by Dropbox. ...

  • Sequel

    Sequel

    It is a simple, flexible, and powerful SQL database access toolkit for Ruby. It includes a comprehensive ORM layer for mapping records to Ruby objects and handling associated records. ...

  • TypeORM

    TypeORM

    It supports both Active Record and Data Mapper patterns, unlike all other JavaScript ORMs currently in existence, which means you can write high quality, loosely coupled, scalable, maintainable applications the most productive way. ...

  • Mongoose

    Mongoose

    Let's face it, writing MongoDB validation, casting and business logic boilerplate is a drag. That's why we wrote Mongoose. Mongoose provides a straight-forward, schema-based solution to modeling your application data and includes built-in type casting, validation, query building, business logic hooks and more, out of the box. ...

  • Prisma

    Prisma

    Prisma is an open-source database toolkit. It replaces traditional ORMs and makes database access easy with an auto-generated query builder for TypeScript & Node.js. ...

  • Hibernate

    Hibernate

    Hibernate is a suite of open source projects around domain models. The flagship project is Hibernate ORM, the Object Relational Mapper. ...

  • Entity Framework

    Entity Framework

    It is an object-relational mapper that enables .NET developers to work with relational data using domain-specific objects. It eliminates the need for most of the data-access code that developers usually need to write. ...

  • SQLAlchemy

    SQLAlchemy

    SQLAlchemy is the Python SQL toolkit and Object Relational Mapper that gives application developers the full power and flexibility of SQL. ...

Sequelize alternatives & related posts

Marvel logo

Marvel

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Prototyping for everyone
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PROS OF MARVEL
  • 15
    Nice UI
  • 14
    Free
  • 7
    Easy animations
  • 5
    Dropbox integration
  • 5
    Iphone app
CONS OF MARVEL
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Marvel posts

    Sequel logo

    Sequel

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    The database toolkit for Ruby
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    PROS OF SEQUEL
      Be the first to leave a pro
      CONS OF SEQUEL
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Sequel posts

        TypeORM logo

        TypeORM

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        An ORM that can run in NodeJS and others
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        PROS OF TYPEORM
        • 18
          Typescript
        • 7
          Supports MySQL, PostgreSQL, MariaDB, SQLite, MS SQL Ser
        • 6
          Easy setup
        • 4
          Works in NodeJS, Browser, Ionic, Cordova and Electron p
        • 4
          Promise Based
        • 4
          Support MySQL & MariaDB, PostgreSQL, MSSQL, Sqlite
        CONS OF TYPEORM
        • 3
          Completely abandoned by its creator
        • 3
          Too complex for what it does
        • 2
          Doesn't really support native javascript
        • 1
          Cannot use query on any relation

        related TypeORM posts

        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 24 upvotes · 1.8M views

        Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

        • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
        • npm as package manager
        • NestJS as Node.js framework
        • TypeScript as programming language
        • ExpressJS as web server
        • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
        • Postman as a tool for API development
        • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
        • JSON Web Token for access token management

        The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

        • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
        • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
        • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
        • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
        See more
        Martin Johannesson
        Senior Software Developer at IT Minds · | 12 upvotes · 262.6K views

        At IT Minds we create customized internal or #B2B web and mobile apps. I have a go to stack that I pitch to our customers consisting of 3 core areas. 1) A data core #backend . 2) A micro #serverless #backend. 3) A user client #frontend.

        For the Data Core I create a backend using TypeScript Node.js and with TypeORM connecting to a PostgreSQL Exposing an action based api with Apollo GraphQL

        For the micro serverless backend, which purpose is verification for authentication, autorization, logins and the likes. It is created with Next.js api pages. Using MongoDB to store essential information, caching etc.

        Finally the frontend is built with React using Next.js , TypeScript and @Apollo. We create the frontend as a PWA and have a AMP landing page by default.

        See more
        Mongoose logo

        Mongoose

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        MongoDB object modeling designed to work in an asynchronous environment
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        PROS OF MONGOOSE
        • 16
          Well documented
        • 15
          Several bad ideas mixed together
        • 10
          JSON
        • 8
          Actually terrible documentation
        • 2
          Recommended and used by Valve. See steamworks docs
        • 1
          Can be used with passportjs for oauth
        • 1
          Yeah
        CONS OF MONGOOSE
        • 2
          Model middleware/hooks are not user friendly

        related Mongoose posts

        Repost

        Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

        Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

        Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

        Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

        See more

        Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku. However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

        Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

        Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

        Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

        See more
        Prisma logo

        Prisma

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        Modern Database Access for TypeScript & Node.js
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        PROS OF PRISMA
        • 8
          Type-safe database access
        • 7
          Open Source
        • 6
          Auto-generated query builder
        • 5
          Increases confidence during development
        • 4
          Supports multible database systems
        • 4
          Built specifically for Postgres and TypeScript
        • 4
          Productive application development
        • 0
          Supports multible RDBMSs
        • 0
          Robust migrations system
        CONS OF PRISMA
        • 1
          Doesn't support downward/back migrations

        related Prisma posts

        Divine Bawa
        at PayHub Ghana Limited · | 16 upvotes · 287.6K views

        I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

        See more
        Munkhtegsh Munkhbat
        Software Engineer Consultant at LoanSnap · | 9 upvotes · 119K views

        In my last side project, I built a web posting application that has similar features as Facebook and hosted on Heroku. The user can register an account, create posts, upload images and share with others. I took an advantage of graphql-subscriptions to handle realtime notifications in the comments section. Currently, I'm at the last stage of styling and building layouts.

        For the #Backend I used graphql-yoga, Prisma, GraphQL with PostgreSQL database. For the #FrontEnd: React, styled-components with Apollo. The app is hosted on Heroku.

        See more
        Hibernate logo

        Hibernate

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        Idiomatic persistence for Java and relational databases.
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        PROS OF HIBERNATE
        • 16
          Easy ORM
        • 7
          Easy transaction definition
        • 1
          Is integrated with spring jpa
        CONS OF HIBERNATE
        • 3
          Can't control proxy associations when entity graph used

        related Hibernate posts

        Entity Framework logo

        Entity Framework

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        8
        An object-relational mapper that enables .NET developers to work with relational data
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        PROS OF ENTITY FRAMEWORK
        • 1
          LINQ
        • 1
          Multiple approach (Model/Database/Code) first
        • 1
          Strongly Object-Oriented
        • 1
          Code first approach
        • 1
          Object Oriented
        • 1
          Model first approach
        • 1
          Auto generated code
        • 1
          Strongly typed entities
        • 0
          Database first
        CONS OF ENTITY FRAMEWORK
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Entity Framework posts

          SQLAlchemy logo

          SQLAlchemy

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          3
          The Python SQL Toolkit and Object Relational Mapper
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          PROS OF SQLALCHEMY
          • 3
            Open Source
          CONS OF SQLALCHEMY
            Be the first to leave a con

            related SQLAlchemy posts

            Django Stars
            Developer at Django Stars · | 3 upvotes · 65.6K views

            Merging Django ORM with SQLAlchemy for Easier Data Analysis (Video Inside)

            Development of products with Django framework is usually easy and straightforward; great documentation, many tools out of the box, plenty of open source libraries and big community. Django ORM takes full control about SQL layer protecting you from mistakes, and underlying details of queries so you can spend more time on designing and building your application structure in Python code. However, sometimes such behavior may hurt - for example, when you’re building a project related to data analysis. Building advanced queries with Django is not very easy; it’s hard to read (in Python) and hard to understand what’s going on in SQL-level without logging or printing generated SQL queries somewhere. Moreover, such queries could not be efficient enough, so this will hit you back when you load more data into DB to play with. In one moment, you can find yourself doing too much raw SQL through Django cursor, and this is the moment when you should do a break and take a look on another interesting tool, which is placed right between ORM layer and the layer of raw SQL queries.

            See more