Alternatives to StackPath logo

Alternatives to StackPath

MaxCDN, CloudFlare, Fastly, KeyCDN, and BunnyCDN are the most popular alternatives and competitors to StackPath.
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What is StackPath and what are its top alternatives?

Build your applications and services at the edge, with Edge Computing and Edge Services that give you high performance, full security, and total control.
StackPath is a tool in the Platform as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to StackPath

  • MaxCDN
    MaxCDN

    The MaxCDN Content Delivery Network efficiently delivers your site’s static file through hundreds of servers instead of slogging through a single host. This "smart route" technology distributes your content to your visitors via the city closest to them. ...

  • CloudFlare
    CloudFlare

    Cloudflare speeds up and protects millions of websites, APIs, SaaS services, and other properties connected to the Internet. ...

  • Fastly
    Fastly

    Fastly's real-time content delivery network gives you total control over your content, unprecedented access to performance analytics, and the ability to instantly update content in 150 milliseconds. ...

  • KeyCDN
    KeyCDN

    KeyCDN offers super fast and secure content delivery for minimal loading time. In addition to the CDN, it also offers advanced image processing and many other features such as live logs and Let's Encrypt SSL. ...

  • BunnyCDN
    BunnyCDN

    BunnyCDN is a reliable, powerful and lightning fast CDN designed to offer incredible performance at the worlds most cost-effective pricing. ...

  • Akamai
    Akamai

    If you've ever shopped online, downloaded music, watched a web video or connected to work remotely, you've probably used Akamai's cloud platform. Akamai helps businesses connect the hyperconnected, empowering them to transform and reinvent their business online. We remove the complexities of technology, so you can focus on driving your business faster forward. ...

  • Heroku
    Heroku

    Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. ...

  • Google App Engine
    Google App Engine

    Google has a reputation for highly reliable, high performance infrastructure. With App Engine you can take advantage of the 10 years of knowledge Google has in running massively scalable, performance driven systems. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. ...

StackPath alternatives & related posts

MaxCDN logo

MaxCDN

1.6K
545
99
Our CDN makes your site load faster!
1.6K
545
+ 1
99
PROS OF MAXCDN
  • 47
    Easy setup
  • 32
    Speed to my clients
  • 15
    Great service & Customer Support
  • 5
    Shared and Affordable SSL
CONS OF MAXCDN
    Be the first to leave a con

    related MaxCDN posts

    Justin Dorfman
    Open Source Program Manager at Reblaze · | 4 upvotes · 198K views

    When my SSL cert MaxCDN was expiring on my personal site I decided it was a good time to revamp some things. Since GitHub Services is depreciated I can no longer have #CDN cache purges automated among other things. So I decided on the following: GitHub Pages, Netlify, Let's Encrypt and Jekyll. Staying the same was Bootstrap, jQuery, Grunt & #GoogleFonts.

    What's awesome about GitHub Pages is that it has a #CDN (Fastly) built-in and anytime you push to master, it purges the cache instantaneously without you have to do anything special. Netlify is magic, I highly recommend it to anyone using #StaticSiteGenerators.

    For the most part, everything went smoothly. The only things I had issues with were the following:

    • If you want to point www to GitHub Pages you need to rename the repo to www
    • If you edit something in the _config.yml you need to restart bundle exec jekyll s or changes won't show
    • I had to disable the Grunt htmlmin module. I replaced it with Jekyll layout that compresses HTML for #webperf

    Last but certainly not least, I made a donation to Let's Encrypt. If you use their service consider doing it too: https://letsencrypt.org/donate/

    See more
    Todd Gardner

    We migrated the hosting of our CDN, which is used to serve the JavaScript Error collection agent, from Amazon CloudFront to MaxCDN. During our test, we found MaxCDN to be more reliable and less expensive for serving he file.

    The reports and controls were also considerably better.

    See more
    CloudFlare logo

    CloudFlare

    69.4K
    16.8K
    1.7K
    The Web Performance & Security Company.
    69.4K
    16.8K
    + 1
    1.7K
    PROS OF CLOUDFLARE
    • 420
      Easy setup, great cdn
    • 272
      Free ssl
    • 196
      Easy setup
    • 185
      Security
    • 179
      Ssl
    • 96
      Great cdn
    • 76
      Optimizer
    • 70
      Simple
    • 43
      Great UI
    • 28
      Great js cdn
    • 11
      DNS Analytics
    • 11
      Apps
    • 11
      AutoMinify
    • 11
      HTTP/2 Support
    • 8
      Easy
    • 8
      Rocket Loader
    • 8
      Ipv6
    • 7
      IPv6 "One Click"
    • 6
      Nice DNS
    • 6
      SSHFP
    • 6
      Fantastic CDN service
    • 6
      Cheapest SSL
    • 6
      Amazing performance
    • 6
      API
    • 6
      Free GeoIP
    • 5
      SPDY
    • 5
      DNSSEC
    • 5
      Free and reliable, Faster then anyone else
    • 5
      Ip
    • 4
      Asynchronous resource loading
    • 3
      Ubuntu
    • 3
      Easy Use
    • 3
      Global Load Balancing
    • 3
      Performance
    • 1
      Maker
    • 1
      Mtn
    • 1
      Support for SSHFP records
    • 1
      CDN
    CONS OF CLOUDFLARE
    • 1
      Expensive when you exceed their fair usage limits
    • 1
      No support for SSHFP records

    related CloudFlare posts

    Johnny Bell

    When I first built my portfolio I used GitHub for the source control and deployed directly to Netlify on a push to master. This was a perfect setup, I didn't need any knowledge about #DevOps or anything, it was all just done for me.

    One of the issues I had with Netlify was I wanted to gzip my JavaScript files, I had this setup in my #Webpack file, however Netlify didn't offer an easy way to set this.

    Over the weekend I decided I wanted to know more about how #DevOps worked so I decided to switch from Netlify to Amazon S3. Instead of creating any #Git Webhooks I decided to use Buddy for my pipeline and to run commands. Buddy is a fantastic tool, very easy to setup builds, copying the files to my Amazon S3 bucket, then running some #AWS console commands to set the content-encoding of the JavaScript files. - Buddy is also free if you only have a few pipelines, so I didn't need to pay anything 🤙🏻.

    When I made these changes I also wanted to monitor my code, and make sure I was keeping up with the best practices so I implemented Code Climate to look over my code and tell me where there code smells, issues, and other issues I've been super happy with it so far, on the free tier so its also free.

    I did plan on using Amazon CloudFront for my SSL and cacheing, however it was overly complex to setup and it costs money. So I decided to go with the free tier of CloudFlare and it is amazing, best choice I've made for caching / SSL in a long time.

    See more
    Johnny Bell

    I recently moved my portfolio to Amazon S3 and I needed a new way to cache and SSL my site as Amazon S3 does not come with this right out of the box. I tried Amazon CloudFront as I was already on Amazon S3 I thought this would be super easy and straight forward to setup... It was not, I was unable to get this working even though I followed all the online steps and even reached out for help to Amazon.

    I'd used CloudFlare in the past, and thought let me see if I can set up CloudFlare on an Amazon S3 bucket. The setup for this was so basic and easy... I had it setup with caching and SSL within 5 minutes, and it was 100% free.

    See more
    Fastly logo

    Fastly

    1K
    475
    137
    We're redefining content delivery.
    1K
    475
    + 1
    137
    PROS OF FASTLY
    • 27
      Real-time updates
    • 23
      Fastest CDN
    • 20
      Powerful API
    • 19
      Great support
    • 13
      Great customer support
    • 6
      Instant Purging
    • 6
      Custom VCL
    • 5
      Good pricing
    • 5
      Tag-based Purging
    • 4
      HTTP/2 Support
    • 3
      Speed & functionality
    • 3
      Image processing on demande (Fastly IO)
    • 3
      Best CDN
    CONS OF FASTLY
    • 1
      Minimum $50/mo spend

    related Fastly posts

    Justin Dorfman
    Open Source Program Manager at Reblaze · | 4 upvotes · 198K views

    When my SSL cert MaxCDN was expiring on my personal site I decided it was a good time to revamp some things. Since GitHub Services is depreciated I can no longer have #CDN cache purges automated among other things. So I decided on the following: GitHub Pages, Netlify, Let's Encrypt and Jekyll. Staying the same was Bootstrap, jQuery, Grunt & #GoogleFonts.

    What's awesome about GitHub Pages is that it has a #CDN (Fastly) built-in and anytime you push to master, it purges the cache instantaneously without you have to do anything special. Netlify is magic, I highly recommend it to anyone using #StaticSiteGenerators.

    For the most part, everything went smoothly. The only things I had issues with were the following:

    • If you want to point www to GitHub Pages you need to rename the repo to www
    • If you edit something in the _config.yml you need to restart bundle exec jekyll s or changes won't show
    • I had to disable the Grunt htmlmin module. I replaced it with Jekyll layout that compresses HTML for #webperf

    Last but certainly not least, I made a donation to Let's Encrypt. If you use their service consider doing it too: https://letsencrypt.org/donate/

    See more
    KeyCDN logo

    KeyCDN

    144
    135
    279
    High performance CDN with powerful image processing!
    144
    135
    + 1
    279
    PROS OF KEYCDN
    • 40
      Pay-as-you-go
    • 38
      Cheapest cdn pricing ever
    • 27
      Easy setup
    • 27
      No subscription
    • 23
      Free shared ssl
    • 21
      Fastest cdn i've ever used
    • 17
      Cheap
    • 16
      Ssd-optimized edge servers
    • 15
      Great support
    • 14
      Quick support
    • 7
      Free Custom SSL
    • 5
      Supports HTTP/2 and available globally
    • 4
      No time limit for spending credit
    • 3
      Build for developers
    • 3
      Support Let's Encrypt
    • 2
      Supports SPDY
    • 2
      Server from Turkey
    • 2
      5 zones included
    • 2
      Easy as pie to setup
    • 2
      Brotli Support
    • 2
      No credit card required for free trial
    • 2
      Real-time Log Forwarding
    • 1
      Fastest CDN
    • 1
      Easy to setup & improve website loading speed
    • 1
      Haven't had much time to tinker, but YES
    • 1
      Its very reliable and easy to use
    • 1
      Great customer support, easy setup
    • 0
      A very capable CDN with an affordable price tag
    CONS OF KEYCDN
      Be the first to leave a con

      related KeyCDN posts

      Mountain/ \Ash

      Platform Update: we’ve been using the Performance Test tool provided by KeyCDN for a long time in combination with Pingdom's similar tool and the #WebpageTest and #GoogleInsight - we decided to test out KeyCDN for static asset hosting. The results for the endpoints were superfast - almost 200% faster than CloudFlare in some tests and 370% faster than imgix . So we’ve moved Washington Brown from imgix for hosting theme images, to KeyCDN for hosting all images and static assets (Font, CSS & JS). There’s a few things that we like about “Key” apart from saving $6 a month on the monthly minimum spend ($4 vs $10 for imgix). Key allow for a custom CNAME (no more advertising imgix.com in domain requests and possible SEO improvements - and easier to swap to another host down the track). Key allows JPEG/WebP image requests based on clients ‘accept’ http headers - imgix required a ?auto=format query string on each image resource request - which can break some caches. Key allows for explicitly denying cookies to be set on a zone/domain; cookies are a big strain on limited upload bandwidth so to be able to force these off is great - Cloudflare adds a cookie to every header… for “performance reasons”… but remember “if you’re getting a product something for free…”

      See more
      BunnyCDN logo

      BunnyCDN

      33
      64
      3
      Reliable, powerful and lightning fast CDN with the worlds most cost-effective pricing.
      33
      64
      + 1
      3
      PROS OF BUNNYCDN
      • 1
        No subscription
      • 1
        Cheapest cdn
      • 1
        Pay-as-you-go
      CONS OF BUNNYCDN
        Be the first to leave a con

        related BunnyCDN posts

        Akamai logo

        Akamai

        1.9K
        401
        0
        The leading platform for cloud, mobile, media and security across any device, anywhere.
        1.9K
        401
        + 1
        0
        PROS OF AKAMAI
          Be the first to leave a pro
          CONS OF AKAMAI
            Be the first to leave a con

            related Akamai posts

            Heroku logo

            Heroku

            21.9K
            17.3K
            3.2K
            Build, deliver, monitor and scale web apps and APIs with a trail blazing developer experience.
            21.9K
            17.3K
            + 1
            3.2K
            PROS OF HEROKU
            • 704
              Easy deployment
            • 459
              Free for side projects
            • 374
              Huge time-saver
            • 348
              Simple scaling
            • 261
              Low devops skills required
            • 190
              Easy setup
            • 174
              Add-ons for almost everything
            • 153
              Beginner friendly
            • 150
              Better for startups
            • 133
              Low learning curve
            • 48
              Postgres hosting
            • 41
              Easy to add collaborators
            • 30
              Faster development
            • 24
              Awesome documentation
            • 19
              Simple rollback
            • 19
              Focus on product, not deployment
            • 15
              Natural companion for rails development
            • 15
              Easy integration
            • 12
              Great customer support
            • 8
              GitHub integration
            • 6
              Painless & well documented
            • 6
              No-ops
            • 4
              I love that they make it free to launch a side project
            • 4
              Free
            • 3
              Great UI
            • 3
              Just works
            • 2
              PostgreSQL forking and following
            • 2
              MySQL extension
            • 1
              Security
            • 1
              Able to host stuff good like Discord Bot
            • 0
              Sec
            CONS OF HEROKU
            • 24
              Super expensive
            • 7
              Not a whole lot of flexibility
            • 5
              No usable MySQL option
            • 5
              Storage
            • 4
              Low performance on free tier
            • 1
              24/7 support is $1,000 per month

            related Heroku posts

            Russel Werner
            Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 31 upvotes · 1.6M views

            StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

            Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

            #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

            See more
            Simon Reymann
            Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 29 upvotes · 4.2M views

            Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

            • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
            • Respectively Git as revision control system
            • SourceTree as Git GUI
            • Visual Studio Code as IDE
            • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
            • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
            • SonarQube as quality gate
            • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
            • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
            • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
            • Heroku for deploying in test environments
            • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
            • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
            • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
            • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
            • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

            The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

            • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
            • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
            • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
            • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
            • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
            • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
            See more
            Google App Engine logo

            Google App Engine

            8.2K
            6.4K
            609
            Build web applications on the same scalable systems that power Google applications
            8.2K
            6.4K
            + 1
            609
            PROS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
            • 144
              Easy to deploy
            • 106
              Auto scaling
            • 80
              Good free plan
            • 62
              Easy management
            • 56
              Scalability
            • 35
              Low cost
            • 32
              Comprehensive set of features
            • 28
              All services in one place
            • 22
              Simple scaling
            • 19
              Quick and reliable cloud servers
            • 6
              Granular Billing
            • 5
              Easy to develop and unit test
            • 4
              Monitoring gives comprehensive set of key indicators
            • 3
              Create APIs quickly with cloud endpoints
            • 3
              Really easy to quickly bring up a full stack
            • 2
              No Ops
            • 2
              Mostly up
            CONS OF GOOGLE APP ENGINE
            • 1
              It's a Google product - they don't like your political

            related Google App Engine posts

            Nick Rockwell
            SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 11 upvotes · 312.9K views

            So, the shift from Amazon EC2 to Google App Engine and generally #AWS to #GCP was a long decision and in the end, it's one that we've taken with eyes open and that we reserve the right to modify at any time. And to be clear, we continue to do a lot of stuff with AWS. But, by default, the content of the decision was, for our consumer-facing products, we're going to use GCP first. And if there's some reason why we don't think that's going to work out great, then we'll happily use AWS. In practice, that hasn't really happened. We've been able to meet almost 100% of our needs in GCP.

            So it's basically mostly Google Kubernetes Engine , we're mostly running stuff on Kubernetes right now.

            #AWStoGCPmigration #cloudmigration #migration

            See more
            Aliadoc Team

            In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

            For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

            For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

            We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

            Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

            See more