CouchDB vs Memcached vs MySQL

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CouchDB
CouchDB

287
245
+ 1
136
Memcached
Memcached

2.7K
1.6K
+ 1
452
MySQL
MySQL

23.2K
17.8K
+ 1
3.7K

What is CouchDB?

Apache CouchDB is a database that uses JSON for documents, JavaScript for MapReduce indexes, and regular HTTP for its API. CouchDB is a database that completely embraces the web. Store your data with JSON documents. Access your documents and query your indexes with your web browser, via HTTP. Index, combine, and transform your documents with JavaScript.

What is Memcached?

Memcached is an in-memory key-value store for small chunks of arbitrary data (strings, objects) from results of database calls, API calls, or page rendering.

What is MySQL?

The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.
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Why do developers choose MySQL?

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      What are some alternatives to CouchDB, Memcached, and MySQL?
      MongoDB
      MongoDB stores data in JSON-like documents that can vary in structure, offering a dynamic, flexible schema. MongoDB was also designed for high availability and scalability, with built-in replication and auto-sharding.
      Couchbase
      Developed as an alternative to traditionally inflexible SQL databases, the Couchbase NoSQL database is built on an open source foundation and architected to help developers solve real-world problems and meet high scalability demands.
      Cloudant
      Cloudant’s distributed database as a service (DBaaS) allows developers of fast-growing web and mobile apps to focus on building and improving their products, instead of worrying about scaling and managing databases on their own.
      MariaDB
      Started by core members of the original MySQL team, MariaDB actively works with outside developers to deliver the most featureful, stable, and sanely licensed open SQL server in the industry. MariaDB is designed as a drop-in replacement of MySQL(R) with more features, new storage engines, fewer bugs, and better performance.
      RethinkDB
      RethinkDB is built to store JSON documents, and scale to multiple machines with very little effort. It has a pleasant query language that supports really useful queries like table joins and group by, and is easy to setup and learn.
      See all alternatives
      Decisions about CouchDB, Memcached, and MySQL
      HAProxy
      HAProxy
      Varnish
      Varnish
      Tornado
      Tornado
      Django
      Django
      Redis
      Redis
      RabbitMQ
      RabbitMQ
      nginx
      nginx
      Memcached
      Memcached
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Python
      Python
      Node.js
      Node.js

      Around the time of their Series A, Pinterest’s stack included Python and Django, with Tornado and Node.js as web servers. Memcached / Membase and Redis handled caching, with RabbitMQ handling queueing. Nginx, HAproxy and Varnish managed static-delivery and load-balancing, with persistent data storage handled by MySQL.

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      Kir Shatrov
      Kir Shatrov
      Production Engineer at Shopify · | 12 upvotes · 55.3K views
      atShopifyShopify
      Redis
      Redis
      Memcached
      Memcached
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Rails
      Rails

      As is common in the Rails stack, since the very beginning, we've stayed with MySQL as a relational database, Memcached for key/value storage and Redis for queues and background jobs.

      In 2014, we could no longer store all our data in a single MySQL instance - even by buying better hardware. We decided to use sharding and split all of Shopify into dozens of database partitions.

      Sharding played nicely for us because Shopify merchants are isolated from each other and we were able to put a subset of merchants on a single shard. It would have been harder if our business assumed shared data between customers.

      The sharding project bought us some time regarding database capacity, but as we soon found out, there was a huge single point of failure in our infrastructure. All those shards were still using a single Redis. At one point, the outage of that Redis took down all of Shopify, causing a major disruption we later called “Redismageddon”. This taught us an important lesson to avoid any resources that are shared across all of Shopify.

      Over the years, we moved from shards to the concept of "pods". A pod is a fully isolated instance of Shopify with its own datastores like MySQL, Redis, memcached. A pod can be spawned in any region. This approach has helped us eliminate global outages. As of today, we have more than a hundred pods, and since moving to this architecture we haven't had any major outages that affected all of Shopify. An outage today only affects a single pod or region.

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      Kir Shatrov
      Kir Shatrov
      Production Engineer at Shopify · | 13 upvotes · 104.5K views
      atShopifyShopify
      Memcached
      Memcached
      Redis
      Redis
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Google Kubernetes Engine
      Google Kubernetes Engine
      Kubernetes
      Kubernetes
      Docker
      Docker

      At Shopify, over the years, we moved from shards to the concept of "pods". A pod is a fully isolated instance of Shopify with its own datastores like MySQL, Redis, Memcached. A pod can be spawned in any region. This approach has helped us eliminate global outages. As of today, we have more than a hundred pods, and since moving to this architecture we haven't had any major outages that affected all of Shopify. An outage today only affects a single pod or region.

      As we grew into hundreds of shards and pods, it became clear that we needed a solution to orchestrate those deployments. Today, we use Docker, Kubernetes, and Google Kubernetes Engine to make it easy to bootstrap resources for new Shopify Pods.

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      Conor Myhrvold
      Conor Myhrvold
      Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 5 upvotes · 82K views
      atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
      Python
      Python
      MySQL
      MySQL
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL

      Our most popular (& controversial!) article to date on the Uber Engineering blog in 3+ yrs. Why we moved from PostgreSQL to MySQL. In essence, it was due to a variety of limitations of Postgres at the time. Fun fact -- earlier in Uber's history we'd actually moved from MySQL to Postgres before switching back for good, & though we published the article in Summer 2016 we haven't looked back since:

      The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL (https://eng.uber.com/schemaless-part-one/). In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL:

      https://eng.uber.com/mysql-migration/

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      Jonathan Pugh
      Jonathan Pugh
      Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 18 upvotes · 173.9K views
      Pouchdb
      Pouchdb
      CouchDB
      CouchDB
      Font Awesome
      Font Awesome
      CSS 3
      CSS 3
      Apache Cordova
      Apache Cordova
      PhoneGap
      PhoneGap
      HTML5
      HTML5
      Ruby
      Ruby
      Babel
      Babel
      Webpack
      Webpack
      Visual Studio Code
      Visual Studio Code
      Figma
      Figma
      TypeScript
      TypeScript
      JavaScript
      JavaScript
      Framework7
      Framework7
      #Css
      #CSS3
      #SCSS
      #Sass
      #Less
      #Electron
      #HandleBars
      #Template7
      #Sketch
      #GraphQL
      #HTML5
      #GraphCool

      I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

      For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

      Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

      I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

      I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

      I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

      I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

      For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

      For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

      For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

      I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

      So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon Elasticsearch Service
      Amazon Elasticsearch Service
      AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
      AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
      Memcached
      Memcached
      Redis
      Redis
      Python
      Python
      AWS Lambda
      AWS Lambda
      Amazon RDS
      Amazon RDS
      Microsoft SQL Server
      Microsoft SQL Server
      MariaDB
      MariaDB
      Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
      Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
      Rails
      Rails
      Ruby
      Ruby
      Heroku
      Heroku
      AWS Elastic Beanstalk
      AWS Elastic Beanstalk

      We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

      We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

      In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

      Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

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      Khauth György
      Khauth György
      CTO at SalesAutopilot Kft. · | 11 upvotes · 94.3K views
      atSalesAutopilot Kft.SalesAutopilot Kft.
      AWS CodePipeline
      AWS CodePipeline
      Jenkins
      Jenkins
      Docker
      Docker
      vuex
      vuex
      Vuetify
      Vuetify
      Vue.js
      Vue.js
      jQuery UI
      jQuery UI
      Redis
      Redis
      MongoDB
      MongoDB
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Amazon Route 53
      Amazon Route 53
      Amazon CloudFront
      Amazon CloudFront
      Amazon SNS
      Amazon SNS
      Amazon CloudWatch
      Amazon CloudWatch
      GitHub
      GitHub

      I'm the CTO of a marketing automation SaaS. Because of the continuously increasing load we moved to the AWSCloud. We are using more and more features of AWS: Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53 and so on.

      Our main Database is MySQL but for the hundreds of GB document data we use MongoDB more and more. We started to use Redis for cache and other time sensitive operations.

      On the front-end we use jQuery UI + Smarty but now we refactor our app to use Vue.js with Vuetify. Because our app is relatively complex we need to use vuex as well.

      On the development side we use GitHub as our main repo, Docker for local and server environment and Jenkins and AWS CodePipeline for Continuous Integration.

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      StackShare Editors
      StackShare Editors
      Apache Thrift
      Apache Thrift
      Kotlin
      Kotlin
      Presto
      Presto
      HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)
      HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)
      gRPC
      gRPC
      Kubernetes
      Kubernetes
      Apache Spark
      Apache Spark
      Airflow
      Airflow
      Terraform
      Terraform
      Hadoop
      Hadoop
      Swift
      Swift
      Hack
      Hack
      Memcached
      Memcached
      Consul
      Consul
      Chef
      Chef
      Prometheus
      Prometheus

      Since the beginning, Cal Henderson has been the CTO of Slack. Earlier this year, he commented on a Quora question summarizing their current stack.

      Apps
      • Web: a mix of JavaScript/ES6 and React.
      • Desktop: And Electron to ship it as a desktop application.
      • Android: a mix of Java and Kotlin.
      • iOS: written in a mix of Objective C and Swift.
      Backend
      • The core application and the API written in PHP/Hack that runs on HHVM.
      • The data is stored in MySQL using Vitess.
      • Caching is done using Memcached and MCRouter.
      • The search service takes help from SolrCloud, with various Java services.
      • The messaging system uses WebSockets with many services in Java and Go.
      • Load balancing is done using HAproxy with Consul for configuration.
      • Most services talk to each other over gRPC,
      • Some Thrift and JSON-over-HTTP
      • Voice and video calling service was built in Elixir.
      Data warehouse
      • Built using open source tools including Presto, Spark, Airflow, Hadoop and Kafka.
      Etc
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      Julien DeFrance
      Julien DeFrance
      Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 363.5K views
      atSmartZipSmartZip
      Amazon DynamoDB
      Amazon DynamoDB
      Ruby
      Ruby
      Node.js
      Node.js
      AWS Lambda
      AWS Lambda
      New Relic
      New Relic
      Amazon Elasticsearch Service
      Amazon Elasticsearch Service
      Elasticsearch
      Elasticsearch
      Superset
      Superset
      Amazon Quicksight
      Amazon Quicksight
      Amazon Redshift
      Amazon Redshift
      Zapier
      Zapier
      Segment
      Segment
      Amazon CloudFront
      Amazon CloudFront
      Memcached
      Memcached
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon RDS for Aurora
      Amazon RDS for Aurora
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Amazon RDS
      Amazon RDS
      Amazon S3
      Amazon S3
      Docker
      Docker
      Capistrano
      Capistrano
      AWS Elastic Beanstalk
      AWS Elastic Beanstalk
      Rails API
      Rails API
      Rails
      Rails
      Algolia
      Algolia

      Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

      I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

      For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

      Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

      Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

      Future improvements / technology decisions included:

      Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

      As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

      One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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      Yonas Beshawred
      Yonas Beshawred
      CEO at StackShare · | 9 upvotes · 25.7K views
      atStackShareStackShare
      Memcached
      Memcached
      Heroku
      Heroku
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Rails
      Rails
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL
      MemCachier
      MemCachier
      #RailsCaching
      #Caching

      We decided to use MemCachier as our Memcached provider because we were seeing some serious PostgreSQL performance issues with query-heavy pages on the site. We use MemCachier for all Rails caching and pretty aggressively too for the logged out experience (fully cached pages for the most part). We really need to move to Amazon ElastiCache as soon as possible so we can stop paying so much. The only reason we're not moving is because there are some restrictions on the network side due to our main app being hosted on Heroku.

      #Caching #RailsCaching

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      Ajit Parthan
      Ajit Parthan
      CTO at Shaw Academy · | 1 upvotes · 5K views
      atShaw AcademyShaw Academy
      MongoDB
      MongoDB
      MySQL
      MySQL
      #NosqlDatabaseAsAService

      Initial storage was traditional MySQL. The pace of changes during a startup mode made it very difficult to have a clean and consistent schema. Large portions ended up as unstructured data stuffed into CLOBs and BLOBs.

      Moving to MongoDB definitely made this part much easier.

      Accessing data for analysis is a little bit of a challenge - especially for people coming from the world of SQL Workbench. But with tools like Exploratory this is becoming less of a problem.

      #NosqlDatabaseAsAService

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      Alex A
      Alex A
      Founder at PRIZ Guru · | 6 upvotes · 8.4K views
      atPRIZ GuruPRIZ Guru
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL
      MySQL
      MySQL

      One of our battles at the very beginning of the road was choosing the right database. In fact, our first prototype was built on MySQL and back then nothing else was even under a consideration (don't ask me why). At some point, I was working on a project which was running on PostgreSQL and it is only then I understood the full power of it. We have over a billion of records in production instance, and we are able to optimize it to run fast and reliable. Well, now my default DB is PostgreSQL :)

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      Tor Hagemann
      Tor Hagemann
      at Socotra · | 2 upvotes · 2.2K views
      atSocotraSocotra
      Amazon DynamoDB
      Amazon DynamoDB
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL
      MySQL
      MySQL

      Much of our data model is relational, which makes MySQL or PostgreSQL (and family) fit the API's we need to build, in order to meet the needs of our customers.

      Sometimes the flexibility of a NoSQL store like Amazon DynamoDB is very useful, but the lack of consistency really impacts usability and performance long-term, compared with viable alternatives. At our current scale, we've seen huge benefits from moving some of our tables out of Dynamo and doing more in SQL.

      There will always be use cases for NoSQL and key-values stores, but if your model is well understood in your business/industry: relational databases are the way to go after finding product-market fit. Always understand the trade-offs (and a few intimate details) of any data store before you add to your company's stack!

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      Joseph Irving
      Joseph Irving
      DevOps Engineer at uSwitch · | 8 upvotes · 7.3K views
      atuSwitchuSwitch
      Go
      Go
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL
      MySQL
      MySQL
      Kubernetes
      Kubernetes
      Vault
      Vault

      At uSwitch we use Vault to generate short lived database credentials for our applications running in Kubernetes. We wanted to move from an environment where we had 100 dbs with a variety of static passwords being shared around to a place where each pod would have credentials that only last for its lifetime.

      We chose vault because:

      • It had built in Kubernetes support so we could use service accounts to permission which pods could access which database.

      • A terraform provider so that we could configure both our RDS instances and their vault configuration in one place.

      • A variety of database providers including MySQL/PostgreSQL (our most common dbs).

      • A good api/Go -sdk so that we could build tooling around it to simplify development worfklow.

      • It had other features we would utilise such as PKI

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      MongoDB
      MongoDB
      MySQL
      MySQL
      .NET Core
      .NET Core
      C#
      C#

      Hi! I needed to choose a full stack of tools for a web drop shipping site without the payment process for a family startup proyect. It will feed from several web services (JSON), I'm looking forward a 4,200 articles tops. For web use only and for a few clients at the beginning.

      I'm considering C# with .NET Core 3.0 as is the one language I'm starting to learn. For the Database I haven´t made my mind yet, but could be MySQL or MongoDB any advice is welcome as I'm getting back to programming after year away from this awesome world. Thanks

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      Interest over time
      Reviews of CouchDB, Memcached, and MySQL
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      How developers use CouchDB, Memcached, and MySQL
      Avatar of Rajeshkumar T
      Rajeshkumar T uses MySQLMySQL
      • We are used MySQL database to build the Online Food Ordering System

        • Its best support normalization and all joins ( Restaurant details & Ordering, customer management, food menu, order transaction & food delivery).
        • Best for performance and structured the data.
        • Its help to stored the instant updates received from food delivery app ( update the real-time driver GPS location).
      Avatar of Srinivas Adireddi
      Srinivas Adireddi uses MySQLMySQL

      1.It's very popular. Heared about it in Database class 2. The most comprehensive set of advanced features, management tools and technical support to achieve the highest levels of MySQL scalability, security, reliability, and uptime. 3. MySQL is an open-source relational database management system. Its name is a combination of "My", the name of co-founder Michael Widenius's daughter, and "SQL", the abbreviation for Structured Query Language.

      Avatar of ShadowICT
      ShadowICT uses MySQLMySQL

      We use MySQL and variants thereof to store the data for our projects such as the community. MySQL being a well established product means that support is available whenever it is required along with an extensive list of support articles all over the web for diagnosing issues. Variants are also used where needed when, for example, better performance is needed.

      Avatar of shridhardalavi
      shridhardalavi uses MySQLMySQL

      MySQL is a freely available open source Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) that uses Structured Query Language (SQL). SQL is the most popular language for adding, accessing and managing content in a database. It is most noted for its quick processing, proven reliability, ease and flexibility of use.

      Avatar of King's Digital Lab
      King's Digital Lab uses CouchDBCouchDB

      Document (JSON) DB.

      • - queries must be pre-defined as views (not as flexible as query formulation on the fly)
      • - community and ecosystem not as large as mongodb
      • + PouchDB is an excellent JS library to interact with CouchDB or even work in offline-then-sync moce
      Avatar of John Galbraith
      John Galbraith uses MySQLMySQL

      I am not using this DB for blog posts or data stored on the site. I am using to track IP addresses and fully qualified domain names of attacker machines that either posted spam on my website, pig flooded me, or had more that a certain number of failed SSH attempts.

      Avatar of Smileupps
      Smileupps uses CouchDBCouchDB

      By being built on, of, in and around CouchDB, Smileupps offers to its customers secure and reliable CouchDB hosting and a CouchDB-based app store to build and sell serious business-enabled web applications

      Avatar of Reactor Digital
      Reactor Digital uses MemcachedMemcached

      As part of the cacheing system within Drupal.

      Memcached mainly took care of creating and rebuilding the REST API cache once changes had been made within Drupal.

      Avatar of Casey Smith
      Casey Smith uses MemcachedMemcached

      Distributed cache exposed through Google App Engine APIs; use to stage fresh data (incoming and recently processed) for faster access in data processing pipeline.

      Avatar of The Independent
      The Independent uses MemcachedMemcached

      Memcache caches database results and articles, reducing overall DB load and allowing seamless DB maintenance during quiet periods.

      Avatar of eXon Technologies
      eXon Technologies uses MemcachedMemcached

      Used to cache most used files for our clients. Connected with CloudFlare Railgun Optimizer.

      Avatar of ScholaNoctis
      ScholaNoctis uses MemcachedMemcached

      Memcached is used as a simple page cache across the whole application.

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      Giant Swarm uses CouchDBCouchDB

      We use CouchDB in an internal analysis tool for usage data.

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      Mathias Vonende uses CouchDBCouchDB

      Storage for unstructured, linked and timeseries data.

      Avatar of Aaron Buchanan
      Aaron Buchanan uses CouchDBCouchDB

      json store + geo + _changes

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