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Dropwizard
Dropwizard

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Dropwizard vs Rails: What are the differences?

Developers describe Dropwizard as "Java framework for developing ops-friendly, high-performance, RESTful web services". Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done. On the other hand, Rails is detailed as "Web development that doesn't hurt". Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.

Dropwizard and Rails belong to "Frameworks (Full Stack)" category of the tech stack.

"Quick and easy to get a new http service going" is the top reason why over 23 developers like Dropwizard, while over 822 developers mention "Rapid development" as the leading cause for choosing Rails.

Dropwizard and Rails are both open source tools. Rails with 43.4K GitHub stars and 17.5K forks on GitHub appears to be more popular than Dropwizard with 7.23K GitHub stars and 3.04K GitHub forks.

Codecademy, Groupon, and Intuit are some of the popular companies that use Rails, whereas Dropwizard is used by Yammer, Opower, and ClassPass. Rails has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2320 company stacks & 779 developers stacks; compared to Dropwizard, which is listed in 51 company stacks and 12 developer stacks.

What is Dropwizard?

Dropwizard is a sneaky way of making fast Java web applications. Dropwizard pulls together stable, mature libraries from the Java ecosystem into a simple, light-weight package that lets you focus on getting things done.

What is Rails?

Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
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What are some alternatives to Dropwizard and Rails?
Spring Boot
Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
Play
Play Framework makes it easy to build web applications with Java & Scala. Play is based on a lightweight, stateless, web-friendly architecture. Built on Akka, Play provides predictable and minimal resource consumption (CPU, memory, threads) for highly-scalable applications.
Spring
A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.
Dropwizard Metrics
It is a Java library which gives you insight into what your code does in production. It provides a powerful toolkit of ways to measure the behavior of critical components in your production environment. It provides you with full-stack visibility.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
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Decisions about Dropwizard and Rails
StackShare Editors
StackShare Editors
Rails
Rails
Node.js
Node.js
Python
Python
React
React
Java
Java
Ruby
Ruby
Go
Go
Swift
Swift
Objective-C
Objective-C
jQuery
jQuery

By mid-2015, around the time of the Series E, the Digital department at WeWork had grown to more than 40 people to support the company’s growing product needs.

By then, they’d migrated the main website off of WordPress to Ruby on Rails, and a combination React, Angular, and jQuery, though there were efforts to move entirely to React for the front-end.

The backend was structured around a microservices architecture built partially in Node.js, along with a combination of Ruby, Python, Bash, and Go. Swift/Objective-C and Java powered the mobile apps.

These technologies power the listings on the website, as well as various internal tools, like community manager dashboards as well as RFID hardware for access management.

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Spenser Coke
Spenser Coke
Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 8 upvotes · 152.2K views
atLoanlink GmbhLoanlink Gmbh
Rails
Rails
AngularJS
AngularJS
.NET
.NET
Node.js
Node.js
React
React
GitHub
GitHub
Trello
Trello
Zapier
Zapier
Mailchimp
Mailchimp
Google Drive
Google Drive
Vue.js
Vue.js
HTML5
HTML5

When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

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Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 19 upvotes · 247K views
atStackShareStackShare
React
React
Glamorous
Glamorous
Apollo
Apollo
Node.js
Node.js
Rails
Rails
Heroku
Heroku
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Webpack
Webpack
CircleCI
CircleCI
Redis
Redis
#StackDecisionsLaunch
#SSR
#Microservices
#FrontEndRepoSplit

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a sep