JavaScript vs Node.js

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JavaScript vs Node.js: What are the differences?

What is JavaScript? Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions. JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is Node.js? A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

JavaScript and Node.js are primarily classified as "Languages" and "Frameworks (Full Stack)" tools respectively.

"Can be used on frontend/backend", "It's everywhere" and "Lots of great frameworks" are the key factors why developers consider JavaScript; whereas "Npm", "Javascript" and "Great libraries" are the primary reasons why Node.js is favored.

Node.js is an open source tool with 35.5K GitHub stars and 7.78K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Node.js's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5086 company stacks & 6486 developers stacks; compared to Node.js, which is listed in 4104 company stacks and 4042 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
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What are some alternatives to JavaScript and Node.js?
TypeScript
TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
Dart
Dart is a cohesive, scalable platform for building apps that run on the web (where you can use Polymer) or on servers (such as with Google Cloud Platform). Use the Dart language, libraries, and tools to write anything from simple scripts to full-featured apps.
CoffeeScript
It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
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Decisions about JavaScript and Node.js
Antonio Sanchez
Antonio Sanchez
CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 14 upvotes · 258K views
atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
PHP
PHP
Laravel
Laravel
MySQL
MySQL
Go
Go
MongoDB
MongoDB
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS

Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

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Conor Myhrvold
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 24 upvotes · 2M views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
Jaeger
Jaeger
Python
Python
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
Go
Go
C++
C++
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
JavaScript
JavaScript
Red Hat OpenShift
Red Hat OpenShift
C#
C#
Apache Spark
Apache Spark

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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Antonio Kobashikawa
Antonio Kobashikawa
Web developer | Blogger | Freelancer at Rulo Kobashikawa · | 6 upvotes · 97.3K views
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
MongoDB
MongoDB
Vue.js
Vue.js
Ionic
Ionic
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
Koa
Koa

We are using Node.js and ExpressJS to build a REST services that is middleware of a legacy system. MongoDB as database. Vue.js helps us to make rapid UI to test use cases. Frontend is build for mobile with Ionic . We like using JavaScript and ES6 .

I think next step could be to use Koa but I am not sure.

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 282.6K views
atDev As ProsDev As Pros
Node.js
Node.js
Rails
Rails
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
RuboCop
RuboCop
JavaScript
JavaScript
ESLint
ESLint
Slack
Slack
Twist
Twist

For many(if not all) small and medium size business time and cost matter a lot.

That's why languages, frameworks, tools, and services that are easy to use and provide 0 to productive in less time, it's best.

Maybe Node.js frameworks might provide better features compared to Rails but in terms of MVPs, for us Rails is the leading alternative.

Amazon EC2 might be cheaper and more customizable than Heroku but in the initial terms of a project, you need to complete configurationos and deploy early.

Advanced configurations can be done down the road, when the project is running and making money, not before.

But moving fast isn't the only thing we care about. We also take the job to leave a good codebase from the beginning and because of that we try to follow, as much as we can, style guides in Ruby with RuboCop and in JavaScript with ESLint and StandardJS.

Finally, comunication and keeping a good history of conversations, decisions, and discussions is important so we use a mix of Slack and Twist

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 5 upvotes · 14.2K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
Node.js
Node.js
Vue.js
Vue.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
hapi
hapi
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL

Node.js Vue.js JavaScript hapi PostgreSQL A pretty basic question for any SaaS is how you deal with what a user can do on their account in a SaaS app? Can Jane on the "Starter" plan create another widget when she is near the limit of her plan? What if she's a trial user?

When building Checkly, I found it pretty hard to find good, solid examples on how to implement this. Specifically for my stack of Vue.js and Node.js / hapi

Turns out this is a mix of things:

  • Feature toggling
  • Counting stuff™
  • Custom API middleware very specific to your situation

Read my post on how we did this and where the bottlenecks are. The HackerNews thread on this has some great contributions too.

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Priit Kaasik
Priit Kaasik
Engineering Lead at Katana MRP · | 7 upvotes · 17.9K views
atKatana MRPKatana MRP
JavaScript
JavaScript
Heroku
Heroku
Heroku Postgres
Heroku Postgres
Node.js
Node.js
LoopBack
LoopBack
React
React
Heroku Redis
Heroku Redis

We undertook the task of building a manufacturing ERP for small branded manufacturers. We needed to build a lot, fast with a small team, and have clear focus on product delivery. We chose JavaScript / Node.js ( React + LoopBack full stack) , Heroku and Heroku Postgres (also Heroku Redis ) . This decision has guided us to picking other key technologies. It has granted us high pace of product delivery and service availability while operating with a small team.

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 7 upvotes · 328K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
hapi
hapi
Vue.js
Vue.js
Swagger UI
Swagger UI
Slate
Slate

JavaScript Node.js hapi Vue.js Swagger UI Slate

Two weeks ago we released the public API for Checkly. We already had an API that was serving our frontend Vue.js app. We decided to create an new set of API endpoints and not reuse the already existing one. The blog post linked below details what parts we needed to refactor, what parts we added and how we handled generating API documentation. More specifically, the post dives into:

  • Refactoring the existing Hapi.js based API
  • API key based authentication
  • Refactoring models with Objection.js
  • Validating plan limits
  • Generating Swagger & Slate based documentation
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Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
Django
Django
Python
Python

Django or NodeJS? Hi, I’m thinking about which software I should use for my web-app. What about Node.js or Django for the back-end? I want to create an online preparation course for the final school exams in my country. At the beginning for maths. The course should contain tutorials and a lot of exercises of different types. E.g. multiple choice, user text/number input and drawing tasks. The exercises should change (different levels) with the learning progress. Wrong questions should asked again with different numbers. I also want a score system and statistics. So far, I have got only limited web development skills. (some HTML, CSS, Bootstrap and Wordpress). I don’t know JavaScript or Python.

Possible pros for Python / Django: - easy syntax, easier to learn for me as a beginner - fast development, earlier release - libraries for mathematical and scientific computation

Possible pros for JavaScript / Node.js: - great performance, better choice for real time applications: user should get the answer for a question quickly

Which software would you use in my case? Are my arguments for Python/NodeJS right? Which kind of database would you use?

Thank you for your answer!

Node.js JavaScript Django Python

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Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 967.8K views
Codacy
Codacy
SonarQube
SonarQube
React
React
React Router
React Router
React Native
React Native
JavaScript
JavaScript
jQuery
jQuery
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
MySQL
MySQL
Hibernate
Hibernate
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Solr
Solr
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Git
Git
Docker
Docker

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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Al Romano
Al Romano
Front-End Web Developer at Virtually(Creative) · | 1 upvotes · 334 views
atVirtually(Creative)Virtually(Creative)
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
npm
npm

We use Node.js because it provides a robust JavaScript server experience and starts to shift the line from traditional full-stack development to "more recently" JAMstack development. What defines a modern application now? I'm not exactly sure. But I love JAM, it's delicious and flavourful.

With Nodes' robust ecosystem of packages via npm and the team behind it having L.T.S. releases, you can safely trust using Node for enterprise-tier, in-production applications to support rapidly evolving businesses and their ever-changing needs.

MAJOR item of note is due to the large ecosystem of package available, having a solid vetting and review system when looking to use/import public packages is a must to maintain application security.

MAJOR item of note is due to the large ecosystem of packages available having an automated process for managing dependencies across a project and project's dev Dependancies is critical for application security (and developer sanity) but should not be the only line of defence.

  • Ideally - having a private registry for your organization goes a long way for creating a modular, component-driven mindset for approaching development. The Javascript ecosystem is largely coming to expect and (personally) works well in tandem with this approach. Having a private, already approved set of items for development means quick scaffolding, faster prototyping and updates are to the package and you can decide versions at a per-project basis. Yay.

Devils' Advocate Of course, this sunshine and rainbows above come at the cost of upkeep, some added development complexity, good documentation behaviour (not just code comments...) and real on-boarding for the Jr's. As with all decisions in a DevOps pipeline looking to do this, it should not be implemented without good team planning.

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Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 45.8K views
atGentlentGentlent
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
PHP
PHP
HTML5
HTML5
Sass
Sass
nginx
nginx
React
React
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
ES6
ES6
TypeScript
TypeScript
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Socket.IO
Socket.IO
Electron
Electron
Python
Python

Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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Osamah Aldoaiss
Osamah Aldoaiss
UI Engineer | Maker at Triad Apparel Inc. · | 6 upvotes · 25.3K views
atTriad Apparel Inc.Triad Apparel Inc.
Gatsby
Gatsby
Lighthouse
Lighthouse
React
React
GraphQL
GraphQL
Node.js
Node.js
ES6
ES6
JavaScript
JavaScript

Gatsby has been at the core of our Shop system since day one. It gives its User the power to create fast and performant sites out-of-the-box. You barely have to do anything to get great Lighthouse results. And it all runs on ES6 JavaScript.

The power of SSR React and then hydrating it client-side to add interactivity and App-like feel is what makes Gatsby powerful.

It comes with a ton of plugins, that are mind-boggling: Image Processing, GraphQL, Node.js, and so much more. This is thanks to a great ecosystem, a great user-base and the revolutionary Community work, which led to the Gatsby repo to be one of the most committed to, out there.

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Nicolas Theck
Nicolas Theck
Student at RocketPlay · | 3 upvotes · 48.7K views
atRocketPlayRocketPlay
HTML5
HTML5
JavaScript
JavaScript
Vue.js
Vue.js
Webpack
Webpack
GitLab
GitLab
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
npm
npm
nginx
nginx
CloudFlare
CloudFlare
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
Sequelize
Sequelize
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
JSON Web Token
JSON Web Token
PM2
PM2
OVH
OVH
Node.js
Node.js
Twilio SendGrid
Twilio SendGrid
#Frontend
#Backend
#Pulsejs
#Passport
#Ns

We use JavaScript in both our #Frontend and #Backend. Front-End wise, we're using tools like Vue.js , Webpack (for dev & building), pulsejs . For delivering the content, we push to GitLab & use GitLab CI (running on our own Ubuntu machine) to install (with npm) our packages, build the app trough Webpack and finally push it to our nginx server via a folder. From there, use accessing the website will get cached content thanks to CloudFlare. Back-End wise, we again use JavaScript with tools such as ExpressJS (http server), Sequelize (database, server running on PostgreSQL ) but also JSON Web Token with passport to authenticate our users. Same process used in front-end is used for back-end, we just copy files to a dist where PM2 watches for any change made to the Node.js app. Traffic doesn't go trough CloudFlare for upload process reasons but our nginx reverse proxy handles the request (which do go trough CloudFlare SSL-wise, since we're using their ns servers with our OVH domain.) Other utils we use are SendGrid for email sending & obviously HTML5 for the base Vue.js app. I hope this article will tell you more about the Tech we use here at RocketPlay :p

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 6 upvotes · 16.9K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
Let's Encrypt
Let's Encrypt
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
Node.js
Node.js
Vue.js
Vue.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
#SAAS

Let's Encrypt Amazon EC2 Heroku Node.js Vue.js JavaScript

We recently went through building and setting up free SSL for custom domains for our #SaaS customers. This feature is used for hosting public status pages and dashboards under the customers' own domain name.

We are in the #Node.js, #AWS and #Heroku world, but most of the things we learned are applicable to other stacks too.

The post linked goes into three things:

  1. Configuring the Let's Encrypt / ACME client called Greenlock.
  2. Getting DNS right on Amazon Route 53
  3. Actually determining what content to serve based on hostname.

All seem pretty straightforward, but there are gotcha's at each step.

Hope this helps other budding SaaS operators or ops peeps that need this functionality.

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 11 upvotes · 38.5K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
Vue.js
Vue.js
Intercom
Intercom
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
vuex
vuex
Vue Router
Vue Router

Vue.js Intercom JavaScript Node.js vuex Vue Router

My SaaS recently switched to Intercom for all customer support and communication. To get the most out of Intercom, you need to integrate it with your app. This means instrumenting some code and tweaking some bits of your app's navigation. Checkly is a 100% Vue.js app, so in this post we'll look at the following:

  • Identifying a user with some handy attributes
  • Getting page views right with Vue Router
  • Sending events with Vuex
  • Some nice things you can now do in Intercom

After finishing this integration, you can actively segment your customers into trial, lapsed, active etc. etc.

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Interest over time
Reviews of JavaScript and Node.js
Avatar of mihaicracan
Web Developer, Freelancer
Review ofNode.jsNode.js

I have benchmarked Node.js and other popular frameworks using a real life application example. You can find the results here: https://medium.com/@mihaigeorge.c/web-rest-api-benchmark-on-a-real-life-application-ebb743a5d7a3

Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

excellent!!

How developers use JavaScript and Node.js
Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

  • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
  • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
  • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
  • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
  • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
  • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
  • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
  • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
  • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
  • Configuration was done with json files.

The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

Avatar of MaxCDN
MaxCDN uses Node.jsNode.js

We decided to move the provisioning process to an API-driven process, and had to decide among a few implementation languages:

  • Go, the server-side language from Google
  • NodeJS, an asynchronous framework in Javascript

We built prototypes in both languages, and decided on NodeJS:

  • NodeJS is asynchronous-by-default, which suited the problem domain. Provisioning is more like “start the job, let me know when you’re done” than a traditional C-style program that’s CPU-bound and needs low-level efficiency.
  • NodeJS acts as an HTTP-based service, so exposing the API was trivial

Getting into the headspace and internalizing the assumptions of a tool helps pick the right one. NodeJS assumes services will be non-blocking/event-driven and HTTP-accessible, which snapped into our scenario perfectly. The new NodeJS architecture resulted in a staggering 95% reduction in processing time: requests went from 7.5 seconds to under a second.

Avatar of Trello
Trello uses Node.jsNode.js

The server side of Trello is built in Node.js. We knew we wanted instant propagation of updates, which meant that we needed to be able to hold a lot of open connections, so an event-driven, non-blocking server seemed like a good choice. Node also turned out to be an amazing prototyping tool for a single-page app. The prototype version of the Trello server was really just a library of functions that operated on arrays of Models in the memory of a single Node.js process, and the client simply invoked those functions through a very thin wrapper over a WebSocket. This was a very fast way for us to get started trying things out with Trello and making sure that the design was headed in the right direction. We used the prototype version to manage the development of Trello and other internal projects at Fog Creek.

Avatar of OutSystems
OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

Avatar of AngeloR
AngeloR uses Node.jsNode.js

All backend code is done in node.js

We have a SOA for our systems. It isn't quite Microservices jsut yet, but it does provide domain encapsulation for our systems allowing the leaderboards to fail without affecting the login or education content.

We've written a few internal modules including a very simple api framework.

I ended up picking Node.js because the game client is entirely in JavaScript as well. This choice made it a lot easier for developers to cross borders between being "client side" game developers and "server side" game developers. It also meant that the pool of knowledge/best practices is applicable almost across the company.

Avatar of Tony Manso
Tony Manso uses Node.jsNode.js

Node.js is the foundation for the server. Using Express.js for serving up web content, and sockets.io for synchronizing communications between all clients and the server, the entire game runs as Javascript in Node.js.

I don't know how well this will scale if/when I have hundreds of people connected simultaneously, but I suspect that when that time comes, it may be just a matter of increasing the hardware.

As for why I chose Node.js... I just love JavaScript! My code is all original, meaning that I didn't have to inherit anyone's bad Javascript. I'm perfectly capable of creating my own bad Javascript, thank you! Also, npm rocks!

Avatar of Gorka Llona
Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

Avatar of Cloudcraft
Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!

Avatar of Tarun Singh
Tarun Singh uses Node.jsNode.js

Used node.js server as backend. Interacts with MongoDB using MongoSkin package which is a wrapper for the MongoDB node.js driver. It uses express for routing and cors package for enabling cors and eyes package for enhancing readability of logs. Also I use nodemon which takes away the effort to restart the server after making changes.

Avatar of MOKA Analytics
MOKA Analytics uses JavaScriptJavaScript

The application front-end is written in JavaScript (ES6). We originally selected it over TypeScript because many library typings at the time were still flaky and the transpilation time was slow.

We are now re-considering TypeScript because 1) the tooling has improved significantly, and 2) and the root cause of the majority of our front-end bugs are related to typing (despite having PropTypes).

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