JavaScript vs Python

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JavaScript vs Python: What are the differences?

Developers describe JavaScript as "Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions". JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. On the other hand, Python is detailed as "A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java". Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.

JavaScript and Python can be primarily classified as "Languages" tools.

"Can be used on frontend/backend", "It's everywhere" and "Lots of great frameworks" are the key factors why developers consider JavaScript; whereas "Great libraries", "Readable code" and "Beautiful code" are the primary reasons why Python is favored.

Python is an open source tool with 25.3K GitHub stars and 10.5K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Python's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5080 company stacks & 6471 developers stacks; compared to Python, which is listed in 2826 company stacks and 3632 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is Python?

Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
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What are some alternatives to JavaScript and Python?
TypeScript
TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Dart
Dart is a cohesive, scalable platform for building apps that run on the web (where you can use Polymer) or on servers (such as with Google Cloud Platform). Use the Dart language, libraries, and tools to write anything from simple scripts to full-featured apps.
CoffeeScript
It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
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Decisions about JavaScript and Python
Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 672.8K views
atStreamStream
Stream
Stream
Go
Go
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
Node.js
Node.js
Babel
Babel
Yarn
Yarn
Python
Python
#FrameworksFullStack
#Languages

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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Jake Stein
Jake Stein
CEO at Stitch · | 13 upvotes · 119.5K views
atStitchStitch
Go
Go
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
AWS OpsWorks
AWS OpsWorks
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Python
Python
JavaScript
JavaScript
Clojure
Clojure

Stitch is run entirely on AWS. All of our transactional databases are run with Amazon RDS, and we rely on Amazon S3 for data persistence in various stages of our pipeline. Our product integrates with Amazon Redshift as a data destination, and we also use Redshift as an internal data warehouse (powered by Stitch, of course).

The majority of our services run on stateless Amazon EC2 instances that are managed by AWS OpsWorks. We recently introduced Kubernetes into our infrastructure to run the scheduled jobs that execute Singer code to extract data from various sources. Although we tend to be wary of shiny new toys, Kubernetes has proven to be a good fit for this problem, and its stability, strong community and helpful tooling have made it easy for us to incorporate into our operations.

While we continue to be happy with Clojure for our internal services, we felt that its relatively narrow adoption could impede Singer's growth. We chose Python both because it is well suited to the task, and it seems to have reached critical mass among data engineers. All that being said, the Singer spec is language agnostic, and integrations and libraries have been developed in JavaScript, Go, and Clojure.

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Sparker73
Sparker73
Frontend Developer · | 8 upvotes · 23.2K views
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
.NET
.NET
PHP
PHP

Node.js is my choice because it uses very few resources to run and it is capable to handle tons of connections simultaneously. Most developers already know JavaScript, the evolution of ECMAScript is immediately reflected to Node.js and all you have to do is update your Server's Node.js version without time and effort. Thousands of improvements that makes it very powerful especially in asynchronous programming. The web is full of courses, dev communities, free sample code, plunkers and many knowledge sources on Node.js that facilitates the learning curve. What else we can ask from a legendary language that is still evolving? I am learning Node.js by developing a simple REST WebAPI and using it as a playground to test situations in which the main objective is to challenge Node.js and compare results and performance with .NET implementations and certain well known fast PHP implementations. Until now the results are astonishing. Summarizing: Node.js for backend is so far (in my opinion) the most recommended solution to get positive achievements in size, speed, power, concurrency, scalability, deployment and running costs.

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Zach Holman
Zach Holman
at Zach Holman · | 40 upvotes · 435K views
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
Rails
Rails
JavaScript
JavaScript

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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Conor Myhrvold
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 24 upvotes · 2M views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
Jaeger
Jaeger
Python
Python
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
Go
Go
C++
C++
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
JavaScript
JavaScript
Red Hat OpenShift
Red Hat OpenShift
C#
C#
Apache Spark
Apache Spark

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
GitHub
GitHub
Linux
Linux
JavaScript
JavaScript
Swift
Swift
Java
Java
PHP
PHP
Python
Python
XML
XML
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
SVN (Subversion)
SVN (Subversion)

I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

  • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

  • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

  • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

  • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

  • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

  • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

  • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

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Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
Django
Django
Python
Python

Django or NodeJS? Hi, I’m thinking about which software I should use for my web-app. What about Node.js or Django for the back-end? I want to create an online preparation course for the final school exams in my country. At the beginning for maths. The course should contain tutorials and a lot of exercises of different types. E.g. multiple choice, user text/number input and drawing tasks. The exercises should change (different levels) with the learning progress. Wrong questions should asked again with different numbers. I also want a score system and statistics. So far, I have got only limited web development skills. (some HTML, CSS, Bootstrap and Wordpress). I don’t know JavaScript or Python.

Possible pros for Python / Django: - easy syntax, easier to learn for me as a beginner - fast development, earlier release - libraries for mathematical and scientific computation

Possible pros for JavaScript / Node.js: - great performance, better choice for real time applications: user should get the answer for a question quickly

Which software would you use in my case? Are my arguments for Python/NodeJS right? Which kind of database would you use?

Thank you for your answer!

Node.js JavaScript Django Python

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Go
Go
Python
Python
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
NATS
NATS
Docker
Docker
Git
Git

Go is a high performance language with simple syntax / semantics. Although it is not as expressive as some other languages, it's still a great language for backend development.

Python is expressive and battery-included, and pre-installed in most linux distros, making it a great language for scripting.

PostgreSQL: Rock-solid RDBMS with NoSQL support.

TypeScript saves you from all nonsense semantics of JavaScript , LOL.

NATS: fast message queue and easy to deploy / maintain.

Docker makes deployment painless.

Git essential tool for collaboration and source management.

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Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 45.9K views
atGentlentGentlent
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
PHP
PHP
HTML5
HTML5
Sass
Sass
nginx
nginx
React
React
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
ES6
ES6
TypeScript
TypeScript
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Socket.IO
Socket.IO
Electron
Electron
Python
Python

Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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Adam Bavosa
Adam Bavosa
Python
Python
JavaScript
JavaScript
asyncio
asyncio
PubNub
PubNub

I love Python and JavaScript . You can do the same JavaScript async operations in Python by using asyncio. This is particularly useful when you need to do socket programming in Python. With streaming sockets, data can be sent or received at any time. In case your Python program is in the middle of executing some code, other threads can handle the new socket data. Libraries like asyncio implement multiple threads, so your Python program can work in an asynchronous fashion. PubNub makes bi-directional data streaming between devices even easier.

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Helio Junior
Helio Junior
Python
Python
JavaScript
JavaScript
CSS 3
CSS 3
#DataScience
#UXdesign
#NodeJS
#Electron

Python is a excellent tool for #DataScience , but up to now is very poor in #uxdesign . To do some design I'm using JavaScript and #nodejs , #electron stack. The possibility of use CSS 3 to draw interfaces is very awesome and fast. Unfortunatelly Python don't have (yet) a good way to make a #UXdesign .

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Kamil Kowalski
Kamil Kowalski
Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 26 upvotes · 195.9K views
atFresha EngineeringFresha Engineering
Selenium
Selenium
Java
Java
Ruby
Ruby
Elixir
Elixir
JavaScript
JavaScript
Cypress
Cypress

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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Ruby
Ruby
Rails
Rails
React
React
Redux
Redux
Create React App
Create React App
Jest
Jest
react-testing-library
react-testing-library
RSpec
RSpec
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MongoDB
MongoDB
Redis
Redis
React Native
React Native
Next.js
Next.js
Python
Python
Bit
Bit
JavaScript
JavaScript

I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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Node.js
Node.js
Java
Java
Spring Boot
Spring Boot
Python
Python
Flask
Flask
Django
Django

Since you said that your middleware will be accessing DB and expose API, you can go with Node.js. It will make your development fast and easy. Suppose in future you will add some business logic you can choose Java with Spring Boot or Python with Flask / Django. NOTE: Language or framework doesn't matter. Choose based on your programming knowledge.

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Jakub Olan
Jakub Olan
DevOps Engineer · | 17 upvotes · 21.2K views
ataraclxaraclx
Java
Java
Python
Python
C++
C++
Node.js
Node.js
Rust
Rust
Kotlin
Kotlin
Go
Go

In our company we have think a lot about languages that we're willing to use, there we have considering Java, Python and C++ . All of there languages are old and well developed at fact but that's not ideology of araclx. We've choose a edge technologies such as Node.js , Rust , Kotlin and Go as our programming languages which is some kind of fun. Node.js is one of biggest trends of 2019, same for Go. We want to grow in our company with growth of languages we have choose, and probably when we would choose Java that would be almost impossible because larger languages move on today's market slower, and cannot have big changes.

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Interest over time
Reviews of JavaScript and Python
Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

excellent!!

How developers use JavaScript and Python
Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

  • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
  • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
  • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
  • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
  • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
  • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
  • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
  • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
  • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
  • Configuration was done with json files.

The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

Avatar of Exchange rates API
Exchange rates API uses PythonPython

Beautiful is better than ugly.

Explicit is better than implicit.

Simple is better than complex.

Complex is better than complicated.

Flat is better than nested.

Sparse is better than dense.

Readability counts.

Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.

Although practicality beats purity.

Errors should never pass silently.

Unless explicitly silenced.

In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.

There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.

Now is better than never.

Although never is often better than right now.

If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.

If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

Avatar of OutSystems
OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

Avatar of Gorka Llona
Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

Avatar of Cloudcraft
Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!

Avatar of MOKA Analytics
MOKA Analytics uses JavaScriptJavaScript

The application front-end is written in JavaScript (ES6). We originally selected it over TypeScript because many library typings at the time were still flaky and the transpilation time was slow.

We are now re-considering TypeScript because 1) the tooling has improved significantly, and 2) and the root cause of the majority of our front-end bugs are related to typing (despite having PropTypes).

Avatar of Web Dreams
Web Dreams uses PythonPython

To me, this is by far the best programming language. Why? Because it’s the only language that really got me going after trying to get into programming with Java for a while. Python is powerful, easy to learn, and gets you to unsderstand other languages more once you understand it. Did I state I love the python language? Well, I do..

Avatar of ttandon
ttandon uses PythonPython

Backend server for analysis of image samples from iPhone microscope lens. Chose this because of familiarity. The number one thing that I've learned at hackathons is that work exclusively with what you're 100% comfortable with. I use Python extensively at my day job at Wit.ai, so it was the obvious choice for the bulk of my coding.

Avatar of papaver
papaver uses PythonPython

been a pythoner for around 7 years, maybe longer. quite adept at it, and love using the higher constructs like decorators. was my goto scripting language until i fell in love with clojure. python's also the goto for most vfx studios and great for the machine learning. numpy and pyqt for the win.

Avatar of Blood Bot
Blood Bot uses PythonPython

Large swaths of resources built for python to achieve natural language processing. (We are in the process of deprecating the services written in python and porting them over to Javascript and node)

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