JavaScript vs TypeScript

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JavaScript vs TypeScript: What are the differences?

What is JavaScript? Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions. JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is TypeScript? A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output. TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.

JavaScript and TypeScript are primarily classified as "Languages" and "Templating Languages & Extensions" tools respectively.

"Can be used on frontend/backend", "It's everywhere" and "Lots of great frameworks" are the key factors why developers consider JavaScript; whereas "More intuitive and type safe javascript", "Type safe" and "JavaScript superset" are the primary reasons why TypeScript is favored.

TypeScript is an open source tool with 51.2K GitHub stars and 7.07K GitHub forks. Here's a link to TypeScript's open source repository on GitHub.

Airbnb, Instagram, and reddit are some of the popular companies that use JavaScript, whereas TypeScript is used by Slack, Asana, and Rainist. JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5085 company stacks & 6482 developers stacks; compared to TypeScript, which is listed in 982 company stacks and 1452 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is TypeScript?

TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
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What are some alternatives to JavaScript and TypeScript?
Node.js
Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Dart
Dart is a cohesive, scalable platform for building apps that run on the web (where you can use Polymer) or on servers (such as with Google Cloud Platform). Use the Dart language, libraries, and tools to write anything from simple scripts to full-featured apps.
CoffeeScript
It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
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Decisions about JavaScript and TypeScript
Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer · | 30 upvotes · 763.5K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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Eli Hooten
Eli Hooten
CTO at Codecov · | 13 upvotes · 79.1K views
atCodecovCodecov
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
CoffeeScript
CoffeeScript
Vue.js
Vue.js
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

We chose TypeScript at Codecov when undergoing a recent rewrite of a legacy front end. Our previous front end was a mishmash of vanilla JavaScript and CoffeeScript , and was expanded upon haphazardly as the need arose. Without a unifying set of paradigms and patterns, the CoffeeScript and JavaScript setup was proving hard to maintain and expand upon by an engineering team. During a move to Vue.js , we decided to also make the move to TypeScript. Integrating TypeScript and Vue.js is fairly well understood at this point, so the setup wasn't all that difficult, and we felt that the benefits of incorporating TypeScript would outweigh the required time to set it up and get our engineering team up to speed.

Choosing to add TypeScript has given us one more layer to rely on to help enforce code quality, good standards, and best practices within our engineering organization. One of the biggest benefits for us as an engineering team has been how well our IDEs and editors (e.g., Visual Studio Code ) integrate with and understand TypeScript . This allows developers to catch many more errors at development time instead of relying on run time. The end result is safer (from a type perspective) code and a more efficient coding experience that helps to catch and remove errors with less developer effort.

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Lee Benson
Lee Benson
React
React
GraphQL
GraphQL
Apollo
Apollo
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Webpack
Webpack
React Helmet
React Helmet
styled-components
styled-components
Sass
Sass
Less
Less
PostCSS
PostCSS
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Semantic UI
Semantic UI
Foundation
Foundation
React Router
React Router
Koa
Koa
#JSX
#React.
#Css
#StyledComponents.
#Async
#HTML
#GraphQL
#Apollo

ReactQL is a React + GraphQL front-end starter kit. #JSX is a natural way to think about building UI, and it renders to pure #HTML in the browser and on the server, making it trivial to build server-rendered Single Page Apps. GraphQL via Apollo was chosen for the data layer; #GraphQL makes it simple to request just the data your app needs, and #Apollo takes care of communicating with your API (written in any language; doesn't have to be JavaScript!), caching, and rendering to #React.

ReactQL is written in TypeScript to provide full types/Intellisense, and pick up hard-to-diagnose goofs that might later show up at runtime. React makes heavy use of Webpack 4 to handle transforming your code to an optimised client-side bundle, and in throws back just enough code needed for the initial render, while seamlessly handling import statements asynchronously as needed, making the payload your user downloads ultimately much smaller than trying to do it by hand.

React Helmet was chosen to handle <head> content, because it works universally, making it easy to throw back the correct <title> and other tags on the initial render, as well as inject new tags for subsequent client-side views.

styled-components, Sass, Less and PostCSS were added to give developers a choice of whether to build styles purely in React / JavaScript, or whether to defer to a #css #preprocessor. This is especially useful for interop with UI frameworks like Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Foundation, etc - ReactQL lets you mix and match #css and renders to both a static .css file during bundling as well as generates per-page <style> tags when using #StyledComponents.

React Router handles routing, because it works both on the server and in the client. ReactQL customises it further by capturing non-200 responses on the server, redirecting or throwing back custom 404 pages as needed.

Koa is the web server that handles all incoming HTTP requests, because it's fast (TTFB < 5ms, even after fully rendering React), and its natively #async, making it easy to async/await inside routes and middleware.

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Jonathan Pugh
Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 24 upvotes · 862.4K views
Framework7
Framework7
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Figma
Figma
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Webpack
Webpack
Babel
Babel
Ruby
Ruby
HTML5
HTML5
CouchDB
CouchDB
Pouchdb
Pouchdb
Font Awesome
Font Awesome
Apache Cordova
Apache Cordova
CSS 3
CSS 3
PhoneGap
PhoneGap
#Css
#CSS3
#SCSS
#Sass
#Less
#Electron
#HandleBars
#Template7
#Sketch
#GraphQL
#HTML5
#GraphCool

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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Hampton Catlin
Hampton Catlin
VP of Engineering at Rent The Runway · | 10 upvotes · 117.4K views
atRent the RunwayRent the Runway
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
TypeScript
TypeScript
React
React

We use JavaScript because it's the standard for web development, especially with browser execution. And, over the years, some smart work by the W3C has taken Javascript from the most-hated-language to the okay-I-can-make-that-good. No small feat!

Obviously, using ES6 and TypeScript is what makes it decent in browser contexts. Throw in a bit of React and now we're cooking with gas!

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TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Java
Java

I use TypeScript because it is strongly typed superset of JavaScript that provides many benefits. Integration with #IDE like Visual Studio Code is excellent. The main benefit is maintainability. Many error can be caught before code running. Also Angular recommends TypeScript as better alternative to JavaScript . Syntax is very easy to learn especially for people from the Java world.

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Andrey Kurdyumov
Andrey Kurdyumov
Sr. Software developer · | 14 upvotes · 11.5K views
TypeScript
TypeScript
Visual Studio
Visual Studio
JavaScript
JavaScript

I use TypeScript because it greatly simplify my refactoring efforts. I regularly re-validate my assumption about application architecture, and strictness of types allow me write make changes safely using just Visual Studio tooling. Integration with existing JavaScript libraries very simple and fast. If I have no time, I could just use any type as output of JS module. When I have more time, I could just submit PR to DefinitelyTyped and it would be quickly accepted. Overall it gives less ambiguity for my code.

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TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript

I use TypeScript because it's like a prettier more type safe version of JavaScript. The big thing with Typescript is that it's clearer to write OOP and type safe items into it. The biggest drawback for me is that you have to transpile it into javascript for it to run meaning you have an extra step before it will run. I don't have a ton of experience with it but the little I've used is really great, and again, there is a ton of documentation because it's a Microsoft product.

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Go
Go
Python
Python
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
NATS
NATS
Docker
Docker
Git
Git

Go is a high performance language with simple syntax / semantics. Although it is not as expressive as some other languages, it's still a great language for backend development.

Python is expressive and battery-included, and pre-installed in most linux distros, making it a great language for scripting.

PostgreSQL: Rock-solid RDBMS with NoSQL support.

TypeScript saves you from all nonsense semantics of JavaScript , LOL.

NATS: fast message queue and easy to deploy / maintain.

Docker makes deployment painless.

Git essential tool for collaboration and source management.

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David Koblas
David Koblas
VP Engineering at Payment Rails · | 9 upvotes · 20K views
atPayment RailsPayment Rails
JavaScript
JavaScript
Flow (JS)
Flow (JS)
TypeScript
TypeScript

We originally (in 2017) started rewriting our platform from JavaScript to Flow (JS) but found the library support for Flow was lacking. After switching gears to TypeScript we've never looked back. At this point we're finding that frontend and backend libraries are supporting TypeScript out of the box and where the support is missing that the commuity is typically got a solution in hand.

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JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Flow (JS)
Flow (JS)

If you will start a project from scratch I recommend to use TypeScript. But, If you work with legacy projects written in JavaScript I recommend Flow (JS). Both tools have the same objective: reduce the bad code (which create illegible code, generate bugs e problems to maintenance). Flex helps you to avoid fall in bad codes, but TypeScript prevent you to c you to create bad codes. I believe cause this some JavaScript fans don't like TS, because TS block you to write some types o code. This is the fundamental difference between TS and Flow: Flow avoid problems, but no force. TS force you to prevent problems.

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Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 45.4K views
atGentlentGentlent
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
PHP
PHP
HTML5
HTML5
Sass
Sass
nginx
nginx
React
React
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
ES6
ES6
TypeScript
TypeScript
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Socket.IO
Socket.IO
Electron
Electron
Python
Python

Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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Gustavo Muñoz
Gustavo Muñoz
Web UI Developer at Globant · | 2 upvotes · 7.3K views
Angular 2
Angular 2
TypeScript
TypeScript
React
React
Flow (JS)
Flow (JS)
JavaScript
JavaScript
CoffeeScript
CoffeeScript
#Angular
#ECMA

Long ago when Angular 2 evolved I had to decide between the new #Angular and TypeScript or React. I really love typing my code, but forced to use TypeScript was a bit too much. I prefer the new #ECMA standard and the evolution of the old and reliable JavaScript. So finding Flow (JS) was an incredible milestone in my career as a developer. Finally, I could use types in my code, and JavaScript with the new standard. I already had the experience of CoffeeScript, so TypeScript was not an option.

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StackShare Editors
StackShare Editors
TypeScript
TypeScript
CoffeeScript
CoffeeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
Flow (JS)
Flow (JS)

From a StackShare community member: "We are looking to rewrite our outdated front-end with TypeScript. Right now we have a mix of CoffeeScript and vanilla JavaScript. I have read that adopting TypeScript can help enforce better code quality, and best practices. I also heard good things about Flow (JS). Which one would you recommend and why?"

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry
Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 4 upvotes · 20.2K views
atFeaturePeekFeaturePeek
Flow (JS)
Flow (JS)
TypeScript
TypeScript
React
React
JavaScript
JavaScript
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
Babel
Babel
Yarn
Yarn
npm
npm
#Frontend

I think our #Frontend stack is pretty standard – but we have taken some deviations from a typical modern stack:

  • Flow (JS) instead of TypeScript. Flow was an easy choice 2+ years ago, as both flow and React were (and still are) maintained by Facebook. Today, it seems that the JavaScript community has settled on TypeScript as the winner. For new projects, I'd choose TS, but I don't see the point in migrating an existing project from flowtype to TS, when the end result will be roughly the same. Sure, memory usage is a bit high, and every now and then I have to kill some zombie processes, but our text editors (Sublime Text), CI scripts, and Babel are already set up to take advantage of the type safety that flow offers. When/if the React team writes React itself in TS, then I'll take a closer look – until then, flow works for us.

  • Yarn instead of npm. When yarn debuted, we never looked back. Now npm has pretty much caught up with speed and lockfiles, but yarn gives me confidence that my dependency installs are deterministic. Really interested in the plug-n-play (PnP) feature that removes the need for a node_modules folder, but haven't implemented this yet.

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Interest over time
Reviews of JavaScript and TypeScript
Review ofTypeScriptTypeScript

Typed JavaScript is just fantastic for medium to large size projects. The type system is well thought and compatible with standard JavaScript. Almost any new Javascript-based development should use TypeScript to save time and prevent technical debt over time.

Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

excellent!!

How developers use JavaScript and TypeScript
Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

  • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
  • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
  • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
  • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
  • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
  • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
  • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
  • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
  • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
  • Configuration was done with json files.

The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

Avatar of OutSystems
OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

Avatar of NewCraft
NewCraft uses TypeScriptTypeScript

Typescript has been a win because, in general, it makes codebase maintenance less brittle. It's significantly easier to refactor in TS than JS, which encourages incremental improvements, file re-organizing, etc. Our developers are happier with the overall development experience.

The downside is that TS sometimes exacerbates problems caused by Node's fragmented ecosystem. Sometimes @types/ don't work, other times types are outdated. This can lead to problems with newly-installed libraries.

If your project is big enough, I'd say TS is nearly always worth it, but it can make selecting libraries a pain.

Avatar of Gorka Llona
Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

Avatar of Cloudcraft
Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!

Avatar of MOKA Analytics
MOKA Analytics uses JavaScriptJavaScript

The application front-end is written in JavaScript (ES6). We originally selected it over TypeScript because many library typings at the time were still flaky and the transpilation time was slow.

We are now re-considering TypeScript because 1) the tooling has improved significantly, and 2) and the root cause of the majority of our front-end bugs are related to typing (despite having PropTypes).

Avatar of Matt Welke
Matt Welke uses TypeScriptTypeScript

Used for Node.js personal projects that I think will have a longer lifetime than others, or that are combined with a web front end component like Angular (to share types).

Generally a poor developer experience. Usage decreasing recently compared to other preferred programming languages/platforms.

Avatar of Marc3842h
Marc3842h uses TypeScriptTypeScript

TypeScript is used in Kuro (https://github.com/Marc3842h/kuro).

Kuro is the browser facing portion of shiro. Typescript is the language in which the web server and the frontend scripts are written in. They later get compiled down to vanilla JavaScript.

Avatar of John Harris
John Harris uses TypeScriptTypeScript

Excellent design-time type checking and the ability for the Typescript compiler to attach typing information to metadata at compile time allows for relatively simple type checking at run-time as well.

Avatar of Blood Bot
Blood Bot uses TypeScriptTypeScript

We, our team can sleep comfortable at night know "x is undefined" will not occur in production. It's also really helpful as IDE help in code completion when they know types.

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