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Amazon CloudFront

Amazon CloudFront

Utilities / Assets and Media / Content Delivery Network

Decision at Dubsmash about Amazon CloudFront, Amazon S3, CloudStorage, ContentDeliveryNetwork, AssetsAndMedia

Avatar of tspecht
‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash ·
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront
Amazon S3Amazon S3
#CloudStorage
#ContentDeliveryNetwork
#AssetsAndMedia

In the early days features like My Dubs, which enable users to upload their Dubs onto our platform, uploads were going directly against our API, which then stored the files in Amazon S3.

We quickly saw that this approach was crumbling our API performance big time. Since users usually have slower internet connections on their phones, the process of uploading the file took up a huge percentage of the processing time on our end, forcing us to spin up way more machines than we actually needed. We since have moved to a multi-way handshake-like upload process that uses signed URLs vendored to the clients upon request so they can upload the files directly to S3. These files are then distributed, cached, and served back to other clients through Amazon CloudFront.

#AssetsAndMedia #ContentDeliveryNetwork #CloudStorage

13 upvotes·306 views

Decision at StackShare about Redis, CircleCI, Webpack, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon S3, GitHub, Heroku, Rails, Node.js, Apollo, Glamorous, React, FrontEndRepoSplit, Microservices, SSR, StackDecisionsLaunch

Avatar of ruswerner
Lead Engineer at StackShare ·
RedisRedis
CircleCICircleCI
WebpackWebpack
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront
Amazon S3Amazon S3
GitHubGitHub
HerokuHeroku
RailsRails
Node.jsNode.js
ApolloApollo
GlamorousGlamorous
ReactReact
#FrontEndRepoSplit
#Microservices
#SSR
#StackDecisionsLaunch

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

8 upvotes·14.9K views

Decision at SalesAutopilot Kft. about AWS CodePipeline, Jenkins, Docker, vuex, Vuetify, Vue.js, jQuery UI, Redis, MongoDB, MySQL, Amazon Route 53, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudWatch, GitHub

Avatar of gykhauth
CTO at SalesAutopilot Kft. ·
AWS CodePipelineAWS CodePipeline
JenkinsJenkins
DockerDocker
vuexvuex
VuetifyVuetify
Vue.jsVue.js
jQuery UIjQuery UI
RedisRedis
MongoDBMongoDB
MySQLMySQL
Amazon Route 53Amazon Route 53
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront
Amazon SNSAmazon SNS
Amazon CloudWatchAmazon CloudWatch
GitHubGitHub

I'm the CTO of a marketing automation SaaS. Because of the continuously increasing load we moved to the AWSCloud. We are using more and more features of AWS: Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon CloudFront, Amazon Route 53 and so on.

Our main Database is MySQL but for the hundreds of GB document data we use MongoDB more and more. We started to use Redis for cache and other time sensitive operations.

On the front-end we use jQuery UI + Smarty but now we refactor our app to use Vue.js with Vuetify. Because our app is relatively complex we need to use vuex as well.

On the development side we use GitHub as our main repo, Docker for local and server environment and Jenkins and AWS CodePipeline for Continuous Integration.

7 upvotes·4.5K views

Decision about Amazon CloudFront, Buddy, Amazon S3, Netlify, GitHub, Gzip, CNAME, Git, Webpack, Devops

Avatar of johnnyxbell
Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare ·
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront
BuddyBuddy
Amazon S3Amazon S3
NetlifyNetlify
GitHubGitHub
#Gzip
#CNAME
#Git
#Webpack
#Devops

When I first built my portfolio I used GitHub for the source control and deployed directly to Netlify on a push to master. This was a perfect setup, I didn't need any knowledge about #DevOps or anything, it was all just done for me.

One of the issues I had with Netlify was I wanted to gzip my JavaScript files, I had this setup in my #Webpack file, however Netlify didn't offer an easy way to set this.

Over the weekend I decided I wanted to know more about how #DevOps worked so I decided to switch from Netlify to Amazon S3. Instead of creating any #Git Webhooks I decided to use Buddy for my pipeline and to run commands. Buddy is a fantastic tool, very easy to setup builds, copying the files to my Amazon S3 bucket, then running some #AWS console commands to set the content-encoding of the JavaScript files. - Buddy is also free if you only have a few pipelines, so I didn't need to pay anything 🤙🏻.

I plan on using Amazon CloudFront for my SSL and cacheing.

What I did wish was easier was connecting the Amazon S3 bucket to my domain name, I tried using a #CNAME but it didn't seem to work so I ended up working, maybe this is a simple step but I'm just not setting it up right?

7 upvotes·2 comments·3.5K views

Decision at Compass Inc. about npm, Amazon CloudFront, AWS Lambda, Semver, Lambdaatedge

Avatar of brenzenb
Engineering Manager at Compass ·
npmnpm
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront
AWS LambdaAWS Lambda
#Semver
#Lambdaatedge

At Compass, we’re big proponents of using NPM and semver (semantic versioning) when distributing our shared components as packages. NPM provides us with an industry-standard platform to publish our internal dependencies. The tools and technologies someone learns while working on a package at Compass are the same ones they’ll use in projects in the open source community. Meanwhile, semantic versioning itself plays a huge role in providing peace of mind. Users of shared components know when updates are safe enough to upgrade to, and component authors can make big updates without the fear of silently breaking the contracts they’ve made with their users. We wanted to build out a way to provide these same benefits to more than just JS libraries, and we ended up creating a lightning-fast form of semantic versioning for our CSS implementation that utilized Lambda@Edge, NPM, and some clever work by our engineers.

AWS Lambda Amazon CloudFront npm #lambdaatedge #semver #serverless

7 upvotes·1.3K views

Decision at TrackJS about MaxCDN, Amazon CloudFront

Avatar of toddhgardner
President at TrackJS ·
MaxCDNMaxCDN
Amazon CloudFrontAmazon CloudFront

We migrated the hosting of our CDN, which is used to serve the JavaScript Error collection agent, from Amazon CloudFront to MaxCDN. During our test, we found MaxCDN to be more reliable and less expensive for serving he file.

The reports and controls were also considerably better.

3 upvotes·1.6K views