GitLab

GitLab

DevOps / Build, Test, Deploy / Code Collaboration & Version Control
Avatar of tabbott
Founder at Zulip·
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I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

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GitHub - zulip/zulip: Zulip server - powerful open source team chat (github.com)
25 upvotes·2 comments·469.7K views
Avatar of thebadmonkeydev
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare·

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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14 upvotes·456K views
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A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

  • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people‚Äôs permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
  • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations ‚Äď such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship ‚Äď for running and testing your code. However, there‚Äôs no built-in CI solution at the moment.
  • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors ‚Äď such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

  • Wiki and project repositories
  • Project uploads
  • The configuration including webhooks and services
  • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

So go ahead with better understanding.

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13 upvotes·171.1K views
Avatar of Fodoj
Cloud and DevOps Consultant at mkdev·

As a small startup we are very conscious about picking up the tools we use to run the project. After suffering with a mess of using at the same time Trello , Slack , Telegram and what not, we arrived at a small set of tools that cover all our current needs. For product management, file sharing, team communication etc we chose Basecamp and couldn't be more happy about it. For Customer Support and Sales Intercom works amazingly well. We are using MailChimp for email marketing since over 4 years and it still covers all our needs. Then on payment side combination of Stripe and Octobat helps us to process all the payments and generate compliant invoices. On techie side we use Rollbar and GitLab (for both code and CI). For corporate email we picked G Suite. That all costs us in total around 300$ a month, which is quite okay.

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Services for Online Education Startup | articles about programming on mkdev (mkdev.me)
12 upvotes·600.3K views
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Keep with GitHub if you feel comfortable, If you want to switch to other keep in mind the change of mindset and you will need time to adapt, i'm not saying that GitLab is bad or difficult just the opposite, but it can be overwhelming because it have more integrated features (I love this) than GitHub , what it means more configs available that you can mess up.

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11 upvotes·68.3K views
Avatar of danielquinn
Senior Developer at Workfinder·
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I strongly recommend GitLab because it's got all the tools you need: no fiddling with 3rd party components that want sweeping permissions on all of your GitHub repositories just to do a single CI job. GitLab's got everything from review tools, to integrated CI, scheduled builds, hosted containers, test coverage badges, sprint planning boards, issue tracker, wiki, and an API if you want to poke at this all programmatically. All of this, for Free (as in beer and freedom) hosted by GitLab or even by you on-site.

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11 upvotes·36.6K views
Avatar of ydbhondekar2407
Co-Founder at weconnect.chat·
Needs advice
on
RabbitMQRabbitMQMongoDBMongoDB
and
DockerDocker

Hi, I am building an enhanced web-conferencing app that will have a voice/video call, live chats, live notifications, live discussions, screen sharing, etc features. Ref: Zoom.

I need advise finalizing the tech stack for this app. I am considering below tech stack:

  • Frontend: React
  • Backend: Node.js
  • Database: MongoDB
  • IAAS: #AWS
  • Containers & Orchestration: Docker / Kubernetes
  • DevOps: GitLab, Terraform
  • Brokers: Redis / RabbitMQ

I need advice at the platform level as to what could be considered to support concurrent video streaming seamlessly.

Also, please suggest what could be a better tech stack for my app?

#SAAS #VideoConferencing #WebAndVideoConferencing #zoom #stack

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11 upvotes·24.3K views
Replies (6)
Recommends
WebRTCWebRTC

You're going to want to look hard at WebRTC. It's what almost every realtime video service uses. The appeal is that it establishes a direct connection between peers so that the massive video bandwidth doesn't need to go through your backend. That aside, actor clusters will be the other technology that handle that sort of traffic well. It was popularized by erlang for telecom backbone, akka is another choice for actor systems.

Infrastructure wise, kubernetes would be a fine choice. Just make sure to look up some benchmarks for Container Network Interface (CNI) implementations that support high bandwidth traffic.

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8 upvotes·738 views
Avatar of BigBugLord
SDET at Ledningkart·
Recommends
DockerDocker

Kubernetes provides Auto-scaling whereas Docker Swarm doesn't support autoscaling. Kubernetes supports up to 5000 nodes whereas Docker Swarm supports more than 2000 nodes. Kubernetes is less extensive and customizable whereas Docker Swarm is more comprehensive and highly customizable. So if your main usecase is autoscaling go for kubernetes else Docker is always a good choice.

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8 upvotes·735 views
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Avatar of aumkung
Web Developer ·

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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10 upvotes·1 comment·1.4M views
Avatar of Scrayos
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)·

We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

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10 upvotes·125.1K views

Bitbucket provides 5 private repositories for free that is I believe the best feature. GitLab seems very simmilar to GitHub. The only reason I've choosen GitHub is its popularity. It seems faster than GitLab, uglier than Bitbucket and featured as others. The best open source projects are hosted on GitHub. Many applications are integrated with GitHub like my favourite #GitKraken.

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10 upvotes·71.1K views