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Application and Data / Languages & Frameworks / Languages

Decision about HTML5, Ruby, Babel, Webpack, Visual Studio Code, GraphQL, Graphcool Framework, Figma, TypeScript, JavaScript, Framework7, Css

Avatar of jdspugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect
HTML5HTML5
RubyRuby
BabelBabel
WebpackWebpack
Visual Studio CodeVisual Studio Code
GraphQLGraphQL
Graphcool FrameworkGraphcool Framework
FigmaFigma
TypeScriptTypeScript
JavaScriptJavaScript
Framework7Framework7
#Css

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research, trying different tools, and 18 years of mobile design & development, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS which I found very frustrating after using #CSS for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. This is not possible with React Native yet.

JavaScript is very far from an ideal language, to say the least. To make life bearable I managed to configure TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. This makes me feel like I'm back in the good old Java days. I consider TypeScript to be one of the rare best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet.

For the backend I chose Graphcool Framework. It has great customer support and a very accessible free startup plan for working on new projects. I was never a fan of relational databases so I'm very pleased to see NoSQL / GraphQL databases coming to the fore and I'm happy to use them. No more server side API development required! NoSQL databases are so much more flexible and the way I think databases were meant to be from the start.

For the IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is blazingly fast and silky smooth for editing code with the ultimate TypeScript checking (since both products are written by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

14 upvotes7 comments13.5K views

Decision at Loanlink Gmbh about HTML5, Vue.js, Google Drive, MailChimp, Zapier, Trello, GitHub, React, Node.js, .NET, AngularJS, Rails

Avatar of bananatron
Product Engineer at Loanlink.de
HTML5HTML5
Vue.jsVue.js
Google DriveGoogle Drive
MailChimpMailChimp
ZapierZapier
TrelloTrello
GitHubGitHub
ReactReact
Node.jsNode.js
.NET.NET
AngularJSAngularJS
RailsRails

When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

6 upvotes42.1K views

Decision at Agenty about HTML5

Avatar of vickyrathee
Founder and CEO at Agenty
HTML5HTML5

We started Agenty in early 2018 and helped many businesses to aggregate the data from thousands of websites, feeds by crawling over a billion pages every month to help them in making data based decisions.

But, over the time we noticed the web is shifting to API model and many of the websites provides the API access, schema structured model embed in web pages to extract the data. So, it became important for us to add something in Agenty which allows users to scrape data from JSON as well along with HTML5 , XML, RSS feeds data scraping.

So, today on December 1st 2018 we are adding JSONPath in Agenty, to allow users to extract JSON attribute easily by defining the the JSONPath query selectors. The JSONPath selectors always refer to a JSON structure in the same way as XPath expression are used in combination with an XML document. Since a JSON structure is usually anonymous and doesn't necessarily have a "root member object" JSONPath assumes the abstract name $ assigned to the outer level object. Here is the detailed article, and also a sample agent available to try out in the demos - https://www.agenty.com/docs/scraping-agent/154/json-scraping

2 upvotes185 views