Alternatives to Amazon Glacier logo

Alternatives to Amazon Glacier

Google Drive, Amazon S3, Google Cloud Storage, CrashPlan, and Dropbox are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Amazon Glacier.
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What is Amazon Glacier and what are its top alternatives?

Amazon Glacier is a cloud storage service provided by Amazon Web Services (AWS) that is designed for data archiving and long-term backup. It offers low-cost storage solutions for data that is accessed infrequently and is stored for long periods of time. Key features of Amazon Glacier include secure and durable storage, data encryption, flexible retrieval options, and integration with other AWS services. However, its limitations include slower retrieval times compared to other storage options, additional costs for data retrieval, and complex pricing structures.

  1. Google Cloud Storage Nearline: Google Cloud Storage Nearline is a low-cost, highly durable storage service for data archiving and backup. Key features include low latency and high availability, powerful data analytics, and seamless integration with other Google Cloud services. Pros include fast data access and customizable storage classes, while cons include potential network egress fees.

  2. Microsoft Azure Archive Storage: Microsoft Azure Archive Storage offers a cost-effective storage solution for rarely accessed data. Key features include data encryption, geo-redundancy, and flexible data retrieval options. Pros include seamless integration with other Azure services and competitive pricing, while cons include potential data retrieval delays.

  3. Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage: Backblaze B2 Cloud Storage provides a reliable and affordable storage solution for data backups and archival. Key features include unlimited data retention, client-side encryption, and simple pricing structure. Pros include customizable storage classes and no additional data retrieval fees, while cons include limited availability zones and potential latency issues.

  4. Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage: Wasabi Hot Cloud Storage offers a high-performance, low-cost storage solution for data archiving and backup. Key features include immutable object storage, global data centers, and predictable pricing. Pros include fast data retrieval speeds and no data retrieval fees, while cons include limited integration with other cloud services.

  5. IBM Cloud Object Storage: IBM Cloud Object Storage is a secure and scalable storage solution for data archiving and long-term backup. Key features include data encryption, automatic data replication, and flexible storage classes. Pros include high availability and durable storage, while cons include potentially complex pricing structures.

  6. DigitalOcean Spaces: DigitalOcean Spaces is an object storage service that offers scalable and secure storage for data archival. Key features include automatic daily backups, CDN integration, and affordable pricing. Pros include easy scalability and seamless compatibility with DigitalOcean droplets, while cons include limited storage class options.

  7. MinIO: MinIO is an open-source, high-performance object storage solution that can be deployed on-premises or in the cloud. Key features include S3 compatibility, erasure coding, and data encryption. Pros include unlimited scalability and self-hosting capabilities, while cons include potential complexity in configuration and maintenance.

  8. Tardigrade by Storj: Tardigrade by Storj is a decentralized cloud storage platform that offers secure and private data archival solutions. Key features include client-side encryption, end-to-end data integrity checks, and global data distribution. Pros include high data durability and low costs, while cons include potential latency issues and limited integration with other cloud services.

  9. Oracle Cloud Archive Storage: Oracle Cloud Archive Storage provides a cost-effective and reliable storage solution for data archiving and backup. Key features include data encryption, automatic data replication, and seamless integration with other Oracle Cloud services. Pros include high availability and durable storage, while cons include potentially higher pricing compared to other options.

  10. Scaleway Object Storage: Scaleway Object Storage is a secure and scalable storage solution for data archiving and backups. Key features include automatic data replication, CDN integration, and competitive pricing. Pros include customizable storage classes and high availability, while cons include potential data retrieval costs.

Top Alternatives to Amazon Glacier

  • Google Drive
    Google Drive

    Keep photos, stories, designs, drawings, recordings, videos, and more. Your first 15 GB of storage are free with a Google Account. Your files in Drive can be reached from any smartphone, tablet, or computer. ...

  • Amazon S3
    Amazon S3

    Amazon Simple Storage Service provides a fully redundant data storage infrastructure for storing and retrieving any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web ...

  • Google Cloud Storage
    Google Cloud Storage

    Google Cloud Storage allows world-wide storing and retrieval of any amount of data and at any time. It provides a simple programming interface which enables developers to take advantage of Google's own reliable and fast networking infrastructure to perform data operations in a secure and cost effective manner. If expansion needs arise, developers can benefit from the scalability provided by Google's infrastructure. ...

  • CrashPlan
    CrashPlan

    It runs continually in the background of a device, providing constant backup of new files. Any time a new file is created or an existing file is changed, the product adds the file to a "to do" list. ...

  • Dropbox
    Dropbox

    Harness the power of Dropbox. Connect to an account, upload, download, search, and more. ...

  • JavaScript
    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

  • Git
    Git

    Git is a free and open source distributed version control system designed to handle everything from small to very large projects with speed and efficiency. ...

  • GitHub
    GitHub

    GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. Over three million people use GitHub to build amazing things together. ...

Amazon Glacier alternatives & related posts

Google Drive logo

Google Drive

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66.9K
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A safe place for all your files
80.5K
66.9K
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PROS OF GOOGLE DRIVE
  • 505
    Easy to use
  • 326
    Gmail integration
  • 312
    Enough free space
  • 268
    Collaboration
  • 249
    Stable service
  • 128
    Desktop and mobile apps
  • 97
    Offline sync
  • 79
    Apps
  • 74
    15 gb storage
  • 50
    Add-ons
  • 9
    Integrates well
  • 6
    Easy to use
  • 3
    Simple back-up tool
  • 2
    Amazing
  • 2
    Beautiful
  • 2
    Fast upload speeds
  • 2
    The more the merrier
  • 2
    So easy
  • 2
    Wonderful
  • 2
    Linux terminal transfer tools
  • 2
    It has grown to a stable in the cloud office
  • 1
    UI
  • 1
    Windows desktop
  • 1
    G Suite integration
CONS OF GOOGLE DRIVE
  • 7
    Organization via web ui sucks
  • 2
    Not a real database

related Google Drive posts

Tom Klein

Google Analytics is a great tool to analyze your traffic. To debug our software and ask questions, we love to use Postman and Stack Overflow. Google Drive helps our team to share documents. We're able to build our great products through the APIs by Google Maps, CloudFlare, Stripe, PayPal, Twilio, Let's Encrypt, and TensorFlow.

See more
Spenser Coke
Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 9 upvotes · 286.5K views

When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

See more
Amazon S3 logo

Amazon S3

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Store and retrieve any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web
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PROS OF AMAZON S3
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    Reliable
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    Scalable
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    Cheap
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    Simple & easy
  • 83
    Many sdks
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    Logical
  • 13
    Easy Setup
  • 11
    REST API
  • 11
    1000+ POPs
  • 6
    Secure
  • 4
    Plug and play
  • 4
    Easy
  • 3
    Web UI for uploading files
  • 2
    Faster on response
  • 2
    Flexible
  • 2
    GDPR ready
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Plug-gable
  • 1
    Easy integration with CloudFront
CONS OF AMAZON S3
  • 7
    Permissions take some time to get right
  • 6
    Requires a credit card
  • 6
    Takes time/work to organize buckets & folders properly
  • 3
    Complex to set up

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Ashish Singh
Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest · | 38 upvotes · 3M views

To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we’ve worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest’s scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

#BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

See more
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 32 upvotes · 2.6M views

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

See more
Google Cloud Storage logo

Google Cloud Storage

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Durable and highly available object storage service
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PROS OF GOOGLE CLOUD STORAGE
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    Scalable
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    Cheap
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    Reliable
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    Easy
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    Chealp
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    More praticlal and easy
CONS OF GOOGLE CLOUD STORAGE
    Be the first to leave a con

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    Context: I wanted to create an end to end IoT data pipeline simulation in Google Cloud IoT Core and other GCP services. I never touched Terraform meaningfully until working on this project, and it's one of the best explorations in my development career. The documentation and syntax is incredibly human-readable and friendly. I'm used to building infrastructure through the google apis via Python , but I'm so glad past Sung did not make that decision. I was tempted to use Google Cloud Deployment Manager, but the templates were a bit convoluted by first impression. I'm glad past Sung did not make this decision either.

    Solution: Leveraging Google Cloud Build Google Cloud Run Google Cloud Bigtable Google BigQuery Google Cloud Storage Google Compute Engine along with some other fun tools, I can deploy over 40 GCP resources using Terraform!

    Check Out My Architecture: CLICK ME

    Check out the GitHub repo attached

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    Aliadoc Team

    In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

    For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

    For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

    We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

    Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

    See more
    CrashPlan logo

    CrashPlan

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    Data protection software for endpoint devices
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    PROS OF CRASHPLAN
      Be the first to leave a pro
      CONS OF CRASHPLAN
        Be the first to leave a con

        related CrashPlan posts

        Dropbox logo

        Dropbox

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        Build the power of Dropbox into your apps
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        PROS OF DROPBOX
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          Easy to work with
        • 256
          Free
        • 216
          Popular
        • 176
          Shared file hosting
        • 167
          'just works'
        • 100
          No brainer
        • 79
          Integration with external services
        • 76
          Simple
        • 49
          Good api
        • 38
          Least cost (free) for the basic needs case
        • 11
          It just works
        • 8
          Convenient
        • 7
          Accessible from all of my devices
        • 5
          Command Line client
        • 4
          Synchronizing laptop and desktop - work anywhere
        • 4
          Can even be used by your grandma
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          Reliable
        • 3
          Sync API
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          Mac app
        • 3
          Cross platform app
        • 2
          Ability to pay monthly without losing your files
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          Delta synchronization
        • 2
          Everybody needs to share and synchronize files reliably
        • 2
          Backups, local and cloud
        • 2
          Extended version history
        • 2
          Beautiful UI
        • 1
          YC Company
        • 1
          What a beautiful app
        • 1
          Easy/no setup
        • 1
          So easy
        • 1
          The more the merrier
        • 1
          Easy to work with
        • 1
          For when client needs file without opening firewall
        • 1
          Everybody needs to share and synchronize files reliabl
        • 1
          Easy to use
        • 1
          Official Linux app
        • 0
          The more the merrier
        CONS OF DROPBOX
        • 3
          Personal vs company account is confusing
        • 1
          Replication kills CPU and battery

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        Shared insights
        on
        Google DriveGoogle DriveDropboxDropbox

        I created a simple upload/download functionality for a web application and connected it to Mongo, now I can upload, store and download files. I need advice on how to create a SPA similar to Dropbox or Google Drive in that it will be a hierarchy of folders with files within them, how would I go about creating this structure and adding this functionality to all the files within the application?

        Intuitively creating a react component and adding it to a File object seems like the way to go, what are some issues to expect and how do I go about creating such an application to be as fast and UI-friendly as possible?

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        Jason Barry
        Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 4 upvotes · 2.4M views

        We've tried a couple REST clients over the years, and Insomnia REST Client has won us over the most. Here's what we like about it compared to other contenders in this category:

        • Uncluttered UI. Things are only in your face when you need them, and the app is visually organized in an intuitive manner.
        • Native Mac app. We wanted the look and feel to be on par with other apps in our OS rather than a web app / Electron app (cough Postman).
        • Easy team sync. Other apps have this too, but Insomnia's model best sets the "set and forget" mentality. Syncs are near instant and I'm always assured that I'm working on the latest version of API endpoints. Apps like Paw use a git-based approach to revision history, but I think this actually over-complicates the sync feature. For ensuring I'm always working on the latest version of something, I'd rather have the sync model be closer to Dropbox's than git's, and Insomnia is closer to Dropbox in that regard.

        Some features like automatic public-facing documentation aren't supported, but we currently don't have any public APIs, so this didn't matter to us.

        See more
        JavaScript logo

        JavaScript

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        PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
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          Can be used on frontend/backend
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          It's everywhere
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          Lots of great frameworks
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          Fast
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          Light weight
        • 425
          Flexible
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          You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
        • 286
          Non-blocking i/o
        • 237
          Ubiquitousness
        • 191
          Expressive
        • 55
          Extended functionality to web pages
        • 49
          Relatively easy language
        • 46
          Executed on the client side
        • 30
          Relatively fast to the end user
        • 25
          Pure Javascript
        • 21
          Functional programming
        • 15
          Async
        • 13
          Full-stack
        • 12
          Setup is easy
        • 12
          Future Language of The Web
        • 12
          Its everywhere
        • 11
          Because I love functions
        • 11
          JavaScript is the New PHP
        • 10
          Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
        • 9
          Expansive community
        • 9
          Everyone use it
        • 9
          Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
        • 9
          Easy
        • 8
          Most Popular Language in the World
        • 8
          Powerful
        • 8
          Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
        • 8
          For the good parts
        • 8
          No need to use PHP
        • 8
          Easy to hire developers
        • 7
          Agile, packages simple to use
        • 7
          Love-hate relationship
        • 7
          Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
        • 7
          Evolution of C
        • 7
          It's fun
        • 7
          Hard not to use
        • 7
          Versitile
        • 7
          Its fun and fast
        • 7
          Nice
        • 7
          Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
        • 7
          Supports lambdas and closures
        • 6
          It let's me use Babel & Typescript
        • 6
          Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
        • 6
          1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
        • 6
          Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
        • 6
          Easy to make something
        • 5
          Clojurescript
        • 5
          Promise relationship
        • 5
          Stockholm Syndrome
        • 5
          Function expressions are useful for callbacks
        • 5
          Scope manipulation
        • 5
          Everywhere
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          Client processing
        • 5
          What to add
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          Because it is so simple and lightweight
        • 4
          Only Programming language on browser
        • 1
          Test
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          Hard to learn
        • 1
          Test2
        • 1
          Not the best
        • 1
          Easy to understand
        • 1
          Subskill #4
        • 1
          Easy to learn
        • 0
          Hard 彤
        CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
        • 22
          A constant moving target, too much churn
        • 20
          Horribly inconsistent
        • 15
          Javascript is the New PHP
        • 9
          No ability to monitor memory utilitization
        • 8
          Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
        • 7
          Thinks strange results are better than errors
        • 6
          Can be ugly
        • 3
          No GitHub
        • 2
          Slow

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        Zach Holman

        Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

        But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

        But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

        Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

        See more
        Conor Myhrvold
        Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 44 upvotes · 10.9M views

        How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

        Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

        Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

        https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

        (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

        Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

        See more
        Git logo

        Git

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        PROS OF GIT
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          Distributed version control system
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          Efficient branching and merging
        • 959
          Fast
        • 845
          Open source
        • 726
          Better than svn
        • 368
          Great command-line application
        • 306
          Simple
        • 291
          Free
        • 232
          Easy to use
        • 222
          Does not require server
        • 27
          Distributed
        • 22
          Small & Fast
        • 18
          Feature based workflow
        • 15
          Staging Area
        • 13
          Most wide-spread VSC
        • 11
          Role-based codelines
        • 11
          Disposable Experimentation
        • 7
          Frictionless Context Switching
        • 6
          Data Assurance
        • 5
          Efficient
        • 4
          Just awesome
        • 3
          Github integration
        • 3
          Easy branching and merging
        • 2
          Compatible
        • 2
          Flexible
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          Possible to lose history and commits
        • 1
          Rebase supported natively; reflog; access to plumbing
        • 1
          Light
        • 1
          Team Integration
        • 1
          Fast, scalable, distributed revision control system
        • 1
          Easy
        • 1
          Flexible, easy, Safe, and fast
        • 1
          CLI is great, but the GUI tools are awesome
        • 1
          It's what you do
        • 0
          Phinx
        CONS OF GIT
        • 16
          Hard to learn
        • 11
          Inconsistent command line interface
        • 9
          Easy to lose uncommitted work
        • 7
          Worst documentation ever possibly made
        • 5
          Awful merge handling
        • 3
          Unexistent preventive security flows
        • 3
          Rebase hell
        • 2
          When --force is disabled, cannot rebase
        • 2
          Ironically even die-hard supporters screw up badly
        • 1
          Doesn't scale for big data

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        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 30 upvotes · 9.7M views

        Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

        • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
        • Respectively Git as revision control system
        • SourceTree as Git GUI
        • Visual Studio Code as IDE
        • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
        • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
        • SonarQube as quality gate
        • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
        • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
        • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
        • Heroku for deploying in test environments
        • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
        • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
        • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
        • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
        • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

        The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

        • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
        • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
        • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
        • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
        • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
        • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
        See more
        Tymoteusz Paul
        Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 8.7M views

        Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

        It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

        I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

        We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

        If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

        The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

        Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

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        Russel Werner
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        Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

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