Alternatives to GraalVM logo

Alternatives to GraalVM

Scala Native, Node.js, Docker, Go, and Laravel Homestead are the most popular alternatives and competitors to GraalVM.
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What is GraalVM and what are its top alternatives?

An ecosystem and shared runtime offering performance advantages not only to JVM-based languages such as Java, Scala, Groovy, and Kotlin, but also to programming languages as JavaScript, Ruby, Python, and R. Additionally, it enables the execution of native code on the JVM via LLVM front-end.
GraalVM is a tool in the Virtual Machine category of a tech stack.
GraalVM is an open source tool with 16.2K GitHub stars and 1.3K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to GraalVM's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to GraalVM

  • Scala Native

    Scala Native

    Scala Native is a new ahead-of-time compiler and lightweight managed runtime designed specifically for Scala. Project is currently in pre-release stage. ...

  • Node.js

    Node.js

    Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices. ...

  • Docker

    Docker

    The Docker Platform is the industry-leading container platform for continuous, high-velocity innovation, enabling organizations to seamlessly build and share any application — from legacy to what comes next — and securely run them anywhere ...

  • Go

    Go

    Go is expressive, concise, clean, and efficient. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel type system enables flexible and modular program construction. Go compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. It's a fast, statically typed, compiled language that feels like a dynamically typed, interpreted language. ...

  • Laravel Homestead

    Laravel Homestead

    Laravel Homestead is an official, pre-packaged Vagrant "box" that provides you a wonderful development environment without requiring you to install PHP, HHVM, a web server, and any other server software on your local machine. Homestead runs on any Windows, Mac, or Linux system, and includes the Nginx web server, PHP 5.6, MySQL, Postgres, Redis, Memcached, and all of the other goodies you need to develop amazing Laravel applications. ...

  • HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)

    HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)

    HHVM uses a just-in-time (JIT) compilation approach to achieve superior performance while maintaining the flexibility that PHP developers are accustomed to. To date, HHVM (and its predecessor HPHPc before it) has realized over a 9x increase in web request throughput and over a 5x reduction in memory consumption for Facebook compared with the PHP 5.2 engine + APC. ...

  • Azure Virtual Machines

    Azure Virtual Machines

    You can create Linux and Windows virtual machines. It gives you the flexibility of virtualization for a wide range of computing solutions—development and testing, running applications, and extending your datacenter. It’s the freedom of open-source software configured the way you need it. ...

  • OpenvSwitch

    OpenvSwitch

    Open vSwitch is a production quality, multilayer virtual switch licensed under the open source Apache 2.0 license. ...

GraalVM alternatives & related posts

Scala Native logo

Scala Native

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61
1
Your favourite language gets closer to bare metal
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61
+ 1
1
PROS OF SCALA NATIVE
  • 1
    Scala is just much easier to program in than Rust
CONS OF SCALA NATIVE
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Scala Native posts

    Node.js logo

    Node.js

    126K
    104.5K
    8.4K
    A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
    126K
    104.5K
    + 1
    8.4K
    PROS OF NODE.JS
    • 1.4K
      Npm
    • 1.3K
      Javascript
    • 1.1K
      Great libraries
    • 1K
      High-performance
    • 795
      Open source
    • 484
      Great for apis
    • 474
      Asynchronous
    • 420
      Great community
    • 390
      Great for realtime apps
    • 295
      Great for command line utilities
    • 81
      Node Modules
    • 80
      Websockets
    • 67
      Uber Simple
    • 57
      Great modularity
    • 56
      Allows us to reuse code in the frontend
    • 40
      Easy to start
    • 35
      Great for Data Streaming
    • 31
      Realtime
    • 26
      Awesome
    • 24
      Non blocking IO
    • 17
      Can be used as a proxy
    • 16
      High performance, open source, scalable
    • 15
      Non-blocking and modular
    • 14
      Easy and Fun
    • 12
      Same lang as AngularJS
    • 12
      Easy and powerful
    • 11
      Future of BackEnd
    • 10
      Fast
    • 9
      Cross platform
    • 9
      Fullstack
    • 9
      Scalability
    • 8
      Simple
    • 7
      Mean Stack
    • 6
      Great for webapps
    • 6
      Easy concurrency
    • 5
      React
    • 5
      Fast, simple code and async
    • 5
      Typescript
    • 5
      Friendly
    • 4
      Easy to use and fast and goes well with JSONdb's
    • 4
      Great speed
    • 4
      Scalable
    • 4
      Fast development
    • 4
      Its amazingly fast and scalable
    • 4
      Control everything
    • 3
      Easy to use
    • 3
      It's fast
    • 3
      Isomorphic coolness
    • 2
      Not Python
    • 2
      Easy
    • 2
      Easy to learn
    • 2
      TypeScript Support
    • 2
      Scales, fast, simple, great community, npm, express
    • 2
      One language, end-to-end
    • 2
      Sooper easy for the Backend connectivity
    • 2
      Javascript2
    • 2
      Great community
    • 2
      Less boilerplate code
    • 2
      Blazing fast
    • 2
      Performant and fast prototyping
    • 1
      Event Driven
    • 1
      Lovely
    CONS OF NODE.JS
    • 46
      Bound to a single CPU
    • 42
      New framework every day
    • 36
      Lots of terrible examples on the internet
    • 29
      Asynchronous programming is the worst
    • 23
      Callback
    • 16
      Javascript
    • 11
      Dependency based on GitHub
    • 10
      Dependency hell
    • 10
      Low computational power
    • 7
      Can block whole server easily
    • 6
      Very very Slow
    • 6
      Callback functions may not fire on expected sequence
    • 3
      Unstable
    • 3
      Breaking updates
    • 3
      Unneeded over complication
    • 1
      No standard approach
    • 1
      Can't read server session
    • 1
      Bad transitive dependency management

    related Node.js posts

    Nick Rockwell
    SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 44 upvotes · 1.7M views

    When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

    So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

    React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

    Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

    See more
    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 39 upvotes · 4.3M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

    See more
    Docker logo

    Docker

    116K
    92.4K
    3.8K
    Enterprise Container Platform for High-Velocity Innovation.
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    PROS OF DOCKER
    • 821
      Rapid integration and build up
    • 688
      Isolation
    • 517
      Open source
    • 505
      Testa­bil­i­ty and re­pro­ducibil­i­ty
    • 459
      Lightweight
    • 217
      Standardization
    • 182
      Scalable
    • 105
      Upgrading / down­grad­ing / ap­pli­ca­tion versions
    • 86
      Security
    • 84
      Private paas environments
    • 33
      Portability
    • 25
      Limit resource usage
    • 15
      I love the way docker has changed virtualization
    • 15
      Game changer
    • 12
      Fast
    • 11
      Concurrency
    • 7
      Docker's Compose tools
    • 4
      Fast and Portable
    • 4
      Easy setup
    • 4
      Because its fun
    • 3
      Makes shipping to production very simple
    • 2
      It's dope
    • 1
      Highly useful
    • 1
      MacOS support FAKE
    • 1
      Its cool
    • 1
      Docker hub for the FTW
    • 1
      Very easy to setup integrate and build
    • 1
      Package the environment with the application
    • 1
      Does a nice job hogging memory
    • 1
      Open source and highly configurable
    • 1
      Simplicity, isolation, resource effective
    CONS OF DOCKER
    • 7
      New versions == broken features
    • 5
      Documentation not always in sync
    • 5
      Unreliable networking
    • 3
      Moves quickly
    • 2
      Not Secure

    related Docker posts

    Simon Reymann
    Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 28 upvotes · 3.3M views

    Our whole DevOps stack consists of the following tools:

    • GitHub (incl. GitHub Pages/Markdown for Documentation, GettingStarted and HowTo's) for collaborative review and code management tool
    • Respectively Git as revision control system
    • SourceTree as Git GUI
    • Visual Studio Code as IDE
    • CircleCI for continuous integration (automatize development process)
    • Prettier / TSLint / ESLint as code linter
    • SonarQube as quality gate
    • Docker as container management (incl. Docker Compose for multi-container application management)
    • VirtualBox for operating system simulation tests
    • Kubernetes as cluster management for docker containers
    • Heroku for deploying in test environments
    • nginx as web server (preferably used as facade server in production environment)
    • SSLMate (using OpenSSL) for certificate management
    • Amazon EC2 (incl. Amazon S3) for deploying in stage (production-like) and production environments
    • PostgreSQL as preferred database system
    • Redis as preferred in-memory database/store (great for caching)

    The main reason we have chosen Kubernetes over Docker Swarm is related to the following artifacts:

    • Key features: Easy and flexible installation, Clear dashboard, Great scaling operations, Monitoring is an integral part, Great load balancing concepts, Monitors the condition and ensures compensation in the event of failure.
    • Applications: An application can be deployed using a combination of pods, deployments, and services (or micro-services).
    • Functionality: Kubernetes as a complex installation and setup process, but it not as limited as Docker Swarm.
    • Monitoring: It supports multiple versions of logging and monitoring when the services are deployed within the cluster (Elasticsearch/Kibana (ELK), Heapster/Grafana, Sysdig cloud integration).
    • Scalability: All-in-one framework for distributed systems.
    • Other Benefits: Kubernetes is backed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), huge community among container orchestration tools, it is an open source and modular tool that works with any OS.
    See more
    Tymoteusz Paul
    Devops guy at X20X Development LTD · | 23 upvotes · 4.7M views

    Often enough I have to explain my way of going about setting up a CI/CD pipeline with multiple deployment platforms. Since I am a bit tired of yapping the same every single time, I've decided to write it up and share with the world this way, and send people to read it instead ;). I will explain it on "live-example" of how the Rome got built, basing that current methodology exists only of readme.md and wishes of good luck (as it usually is ;)).

    It always starts with an app, whatever it may be and reading the readmes available while Vagrant and VirtualBox is installing and updating. Following that is the first hurdle to go over - convert all the instruction/scripts into Ansible playbook(s), and only stopping when doing a clear vagrant up or vagrant reload we will have a fully working environment. As our Vagrant environment is now functional, it's time to break it! This is the moment to look for how things can be done better (too rigid/too lose versioning? Sloppy environment setup?) and replace them with the right way to do stuff, one that won't bite us in the backside. This is the point, and the best opportunity, to upcycle the existing way of doing dev environment to produce a proper, production-grade product.

    I should probably digress here for a moment and explain why. I firmly believe that the way you deploy production is the same way you should deploy develop, shy of few debugging-friendly setting. This way you avoid the discrepancy between how production work vs how development works, which almost always causes major pains in the back of the neck, and with use of proper tools should mean no more work for the developers. That's why we start with Vagrant as developer boxes should be as easy as vagrant up, but the meat of our product lies in Ansible which will do meat of the work and can be applied to almost anything: AWS, bare metal, docker, LXC, in open net, behind vpn - you name it.

    We must also give proper consideration to monitoring and logging hoovering at this point. My generic answer here is to grab Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. While for different use cases there may be better solutions, this one is well battle-tested, performs reasonably and is very easy to scale both vertically (within some limits) and horizontally. Logstash rules are easy to write and are well supported in maintenance through Ansible, which as I've mentioned earlier, are at the very core of things, and creating triggers/reports and alerts based on Elastic and Kibana is generally a breeze, including some quite complex aggregations.

    If we are happy with the state of the Ansible it's time to move on and put all those roles and playbooks to work. Namely, we need something to manage our CI/CD pipelines. For me, the choice is obvious: TeamCity. It's modern, robust and unlike most of the light-weight alternatives, it's transparent. What I mean by that is that it doesn't tell you how to do things, doesn't limit your ways to deploy, or test, or package for that matter. Instead, it provides a developer-friendly and rich playground for your pipelines. You can do most the same with Jenkins, but it has a quite dated look and feel to it, while also missing some key functionality that must be brought in via plugins (like quality REST API which comes built-in with TeamCity). It also comes with all the common-handy plugins like Slack or Apache Maven integration.

    The exact flow between CI and CD varies too greatly from one application to another to describe, so I will outline a few rules that guide me in it: 1. Make build steps as small as possible. This way when something breaks, we know exactly where, without needing to dig and root around. 2. All security credentials besides development environment must be sources from individual Vault instances. Keys to those containers should exist only on the CI/CD box and accessible by a few people (the less the better). This is pretty self-explanatory, as anything besides dev may contain sensitive data and, at times, be public-facing. Because of that appropriate security must be present. TeamCity shines in this department with excellent secrets-management. 3. Every part of the build chain shall consume and produce artifacts. If it creates nothing, it likely shouldn't be its own build. This way if any issue shows up with any environment or version, all developer has to do it is grab appropriate artifacts to reproduce the issue locally. 4. Deployment builds should be directly tied to specific Git branches/tags. This enables much easier tracking of what caused an issue, including automated identifying and tagging the author (nothing like automated regression testing!).

    Speaking of deployments, I generally try to keep it simple but also with a close eye on the wallet. Because of that, I am more than happy with AWS or another cloud provider, but also constantly peeking at the loads and do we get the value of what we are paying for. Often enough the pattern of use is not constantly erratic, but rather has a firm baseline which could be migrated away from the cloud and into bare metal boxes. That is another part where this approach strongly triumphs over the common Docker and CircleCI setup, where you are very much tied in to use cloud providers and getting out is expensive. Here to embrace bare-metal hosting all you need is a help of some container-based self-hosting software, my personal preference is with Proxmox and LXC. Following that all you must write are ansible scripts to manage hardware of Proxmox, similar way as you do for Amazon EC2 (ansible supports both greatly) and you are good to go. One does not exclude another, quite the opposite, as they can live in great synergy and cut your costs dramatically (the heavier your base load, the bigger the savings) while providing production-grade resiliency.

    See more
    Go logo

    Go

    13.9K
    11.4K
    3.1K
    An open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software
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    PROS OF GO
    • 528
      High-performance
    • 385
      Simple, minimal syntax
    • 351
      Fun to write
    • 293
      Easy concurrency support via goroutines
    • 265
      Fast compilation times
    • 186
      Goroutines
    • 176
      Statically linked binaries that are simple to deploy
    • 146
      Simple compile build/run procedures
    • 132
      Backed by google
    • 129
      Great community
    • 48
      Garbage collection built-in
    • 40
      Built-in Testing
    • 39
      Excellent tools - gofmt, godoc etc
    • 36
      Elegant and concise like Python, fast like C
    • 32
      Awesome to Develop
    • 24
      Used for Docker
    • 23
      Flexible interface system
    • 21
      Great concurrency pattern
    • 21
      Deploy as executable
    • 18
      Open-source Integration
    • 15
      Fun to write and so many feature out of the box
    • 14
      Easy to read
    • 13
      Go is God
    • 13
      Its Simple and Heavy duty
    • 12
      Easy to deploy
    • 12
      Powerful and simple
    • 10
      Best language for concurrency
    • 10
      Concurrency
    • 9
      Rich standard library
    • 9
      Safe GOTOs
    • 8
      Clean code, high performance
    • 8
      Easy setup
    • 7
      High performance
    • 7
      Hassle free deployment
    • 7
      Simplicity, Concurrency, Performance
    • 6
      Used by Giants of the industry
    • 6
      Single binary avoids library dependency issues
    • 5
      Cross compiling
    • 5
      Simple, powerful, and great performance
    • 4
      Excellent tooling
    • 4
      WYSIWYG
    • 4
      Very sophisticated syntax
    • 4
      Gofmt
    • 4
      Garbage Collection
    • 3
      Kubernetes written on Go
    • 2
      Keep it simple and stupid
    • 2
      Widely used
    • 0
      No generics
    • 0
      Operator goto
    CONS OF GO
    • 41
      You waste time in plumbing code catching errors
    • 25
      Verbose
    • 22
      Packages and their path dependencies are braindead
    • 15
      Dependency management when working on multiple projects
    • 14
      Google's documentations aren't beginer friendly
    • 10
      Automatic garbage collection overheads
    • 8
      Uncommon syntax
    • 6
      Type system is lacking (no generics, etc)
    • 2
      Collection framework is lacking (list, set, map)

    related Go posts

    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 39 upvotes · 4.3M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

    See more
    Nick Parsons
    Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 1.4M views

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

    See more
    Laravel Homestead logo

    Laravel Homestead

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    The official Laravel local development environment (Vagrant box)
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    PROS OF LARAVEL HOMESTEAD
    • 19
      Easy to setup
    • 13
      Native enviroment
    • 1
      Cool if you finally get it set up 4 Win10 by night Devs
    CONS OF LARAVEL HOMESTEAD
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      related Laravel Homestead posts

      HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine) logo

      HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine)

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      95
      An open-source virtual machine designed for executing programs written in Hack and PHP
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      95
      PROS OF HHVM (HIPHOP VIRTUAL MACHINE)
      • 30
        Very fast
      • 24
        Drop-in PHP replacement
      • 14
        Works well with nginx
      • 14
        Backed by Facebook
      • 12
        Open source
      • 1
        Statically checked, typed language
      CONS OF HHVM (HIPHOP VIRTUAL MACHINE)
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        related HHVM (HipHop Virtual Machine) posts

        Azure Virtual Machines logo

        Azure Virtual Machines

        69
        70
        7
        It provides on-demand, high-scale, secure, virtualized infrastructure
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        PROS OF AZURE VIRTUAL MACHINES
        • 1
          Free Tier
        • 1
          Flexible
        • 1
          Reliable
        • 1
          Backed by Azure
        • 1
          Auto Scale
        • 1
          Scalability
        • 1
          Low Cost
        CONS OF AZURE VIRTUAL MACHINES
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          OpenvSwitch logo

          OpenvSwitch

          6
          2
          0
          Free and Open Source Virtual Switch
          6
          2
          + 1
          0
          PROS OF OPENVSWITCH
            Be the first to leave a pro
            CONS OF OPENVSWITCH
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              related OpenvSwitch posts