.NET vs Laravel vs Node.js

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.NET
.NET

4.3K
2.7K
+ 1
1.5K
Laravel
Laravel

10.1K
7.3K
+ 1
3K
Node.js
Node.js

45.6K
39.4K
+ 1
8K

What is .NET?

.NET is a general purpose development platform. With .NET, you can use multiple languages, editors, and libraries to build native applications for web, mobile, desktop, gaming, and IoT for Windows, macOS, Linux, Android, and more.

What is Laravel?

It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
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Why do developers choose .NET?
Why do developers choose Laravel?
Why do developers choose Node.js?

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What are some alternatives to .NET, Laravel, and Node.js?
ASP.NET
.NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
Django
Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
Rails
Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
Android SDK
Android provides a rich application framework that allows you to build innovative apps and games for mobile devices in a Java language environment.
Spring Boot
Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
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Decisions about .NET, Laravel, and Node.js
John-Daniel Trask
John-Daniel Trask
Co-founder & CEO at Raygun · | 23 upvotes · 180K views
atRaygunRaygun
.NET
.NET
Node.js
Node.js
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

The core Web application of Raygun is still a Microsoft ASP.NET MVC application. Not too much has changed from a fundamental technology standpoint. We originally built using Mono, which just bled memory and would need to be constantly recycled. So we looked around at the options and what would be well suited to the highly transactional nature of our API. We settled on Node.js, feeling that the event loop model worked well given the lightweight workload of each message being processed. This served us well for several years.

When we started to look at .NET Core in early 2016, it became quite obvious that being able to asynchronously hand off to our queuing service greatly improved throughput. Unfortunately, at the time, Node.js didn’t provide an easy mechanism to do this, while .NET Core had great concurrency capabilities from day one. This meant that our servers spent less time blocking on the hand off, and could start processing the next inbound message. This was the core component of the performance improvement.

We chose .NET because it was a platform that our team was familiar with. Also we were skilled enough with it to know many performance tips and tricks to get the most from it. Due to this experience, it helped us get to market faster and deliver great performance.

#Languages #FrameworksFullStack

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Spenser Coke
Spenser Coke
Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 9 upvotes · 246.2K views
atLoanlink GmbhLoanlink Gmbh
Rails
Rails
AngularJS
AngularJS
.NET
.NET
Node.js
Node.js
React
React
GitHub
GitHub
Trello
Trello
Zapier
Zapier
Mailchimp
Mailchimp
Google Drive
Google Drive
Vue.js
Vue.js
HTML5
HTML5

When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

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Sparker73
Sparker73
Frontend Developer · | 8 upvotes · 23.2K views
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
.NET
.NET
PHP
PHP

Node.js is my choice because it uses very few resources to run and it is capable to handle tons of connections simultaneously. Most developers already know JavaScript, the evolution of ECMAScript is immediately reflected to Node.js and all you have to do is update your Server's Node.js version without time and effort. Thousands of improvements that makes it very powerful especially in asynchronous programming. The web is full of courses, dev communities, free sample code, plunkers and many knowledge sources on Node.js that facilitates the learning curve. What else we can ask from a legendary language that is still evolving? I am learning Node.js by developing a simple REST WebAPI and using it as a playground to test situations in which the main objective is to challenge Node.js and compare results and performance with .NET implementations and certain well known fast PHP implementations. Until now the results are astonishing. Summarizing: Node.js for backend is so far (in my opinion) the most recommended solution to get positive achievements in size, speed, power, concurrency, scalability, deployment and running costs.

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.NET
.NET
Azure Functions
Azure Functions
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

I first found .NET in 2003 when I first began learning to create software. Every year since then, I've watched as .NET matured into something great, and now we have .NET Core! At Contessa Health, we use .NET Core for a mixture of things including fine-grained and coarse-grained web services, worker processes for long running tasks, and for our Azure Functions that serve as a replacement for distributing our base class libraries. As a startup, we are constantly evaluating technologies to make sure we stay fresh, and we keep coming back to .NET Core because of its ecosystem, maturity of the tooling, and for its ability to help us iterate and move quickly. Take all of that and combine it with the Kubernetes ecosystem, and we have an easy way to orchestrate and compose power service offerings that meet the needs of our customers. It cannot be said enough that Microsoft’s commitment to open source has yielded incredible benefits for small companies such as ourselves. Our voices are heard, and we get to help make .NET Core better, which in turn helps everyone else.

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Antonio Sanchez
Antonio Sanchez
CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 14 upvotes · 256.6K views
atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
PHP
PHP
Laravel
Laravel
MySQL
MySQL
Go
Go
MongoDB
MongoDB
JavaScript
JavaScript
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS

Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

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.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
Docker
Docker
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

I've used .NET for many years, but only in recent years, after Microsoft introduced .NET Core, I've found a new love and excitement for the technology again. The main driver for us using .NET Core is not that it is cross platform compatible, open source or blazingly fast (which it is!), but the fact that we can use (what we consider) the best programming languages (mainly F# and C#) to carry out our jobs without sacrificing the other benefits.

Today we run most of our web infrastructure on .NET Core in Docker containers, deployed into a Kubernetes cluster which spans across multiple time zones in the Google Cloud and we couldn't be happier. Due to the portability of the .NET Core platform we are even able to develop many new services as serverless functions with F# which has become an absolute game changer.

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.NET
.NET

Our focus is on mobile. I use .NET because most of my work involves Xamarin. We haven't had a need for .NET Core lately since Xamarin covers the iOS, Android bases. .NET Core seems best suited to larger organizations who need to port and migrate between Windows, Linux, and macOS. Seems incredibly useful, particularly the Windows/Linux crossover. But for us, Mono takes care of that already in Xamarin.

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Laravel
Laravel

I use Laravel because it has integrated unit testing that making TDD a breeze. Having a View (Blade engine) making me easier to work without too many efforts in front-end.

I do recommend going into the root of programming once getting stable on any framework. Go beyond Symfony, go beyond PHP, go into the roots to the mother of programming; c++, c, smalltalk, erlang OTP. Understand the fundamental principle of abstraction.

A framework is just a framework, it helps in getting feedback quickly; like practicing dancing in front of a mirror. Getting fundamentals right is the one true key in doing it right. Programming is not hard, but abstract-programming is extremely hard.

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David Block
David Block
Owner/Developer · | 4 upvotes · 510 views
atNorth Creek Consulting, Inc.North Creek Consulting, Inc.
Laravel
Laravel

I use Laravel because once a client asked me to use it, I recognized that as a solo programmer, I could go from idea to basic website in under an hour. Add one of the app builder templates and the basic design is done for me as well (I use AdminLTE). Lead management means a simple database and some basic workflow - that is where you should be spending your effort. Laravel is well-enough designed that you can plug in a few basic web pages, a simple set of object models, and some Controllers that hold your business logic - and then you iterate on the pages (the UI) and the business logic until your requirements are met. If you are a stickler or have corporate CSS standards, they can be implemented easily enough. And the community is huge and friendly.

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David Block
David Block
Owner/Developer · | 9 upvotes · 10.9K views
atNorth Creek Consulting, Inc.North Creek Consulting, Inc.
Laravel
Laravel

I use Laravel because once a client asked me to use it, I recognized that as a solo programmer, I could go from idea to basic website in under an hour. Add one of the app builder templates and the basic design is done for me as well (I use AdminLTE). Lead management means a simple database and some basic workflow - that is where you should be spending your effort. Laravel is well-enough designed that you can plug in a few basic web pages, a simple set of object models, and some Controllers that hold your business logic - and then you iterate on the pages (the UI) and the business logic until your requirements are met. If you are a stickler or have corporate CSS standards, they can be implemented easily enough. And the community is huge and friendly.

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Jason Martin
Jason Martin
Senior PHP Developer at Orange · | 14 upvotes · 64.7K views
Laravel
Laravel
MySQL
MySQL
Debian
Debian

For your purposes, I recommend @Laravel, or even @Symfony or @Yii, or whatever. In your use case, a framework is 100% indicated, because it will cut your boilerplate in half or more, and you'll have a pre-fab organization for files, classes and so on. Personally, I am not a fan of Frameworks, because they tend to take over your project like cancer and trap you. But for an internal app to manage stuff, it's probably the best idea to use one (preferably one you like).

When doing internal apps, your best bet is to stick the essentials and basics, try Laravel with MySQL on a nice Debian virtual machine. Can't go wrong.

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Tanner Naeher
Tanner Naeher
owner, designer, developer at Coyote6 GraphX · | 3 upvotes · 363 views
Laravel
Laravel

If you are going to build from scratch use Laravel, because it is a little easier to learn than Symfony. They have a bunch of great videos to help you along the way. If you know Drupal 8 already, that is built on Symfony and you can harness the backend, but it is going to have a steeper learning curve. On the plus side you can take advantage of all its features. I wouldn't recommend building without a type of framework. Thousands of man hours have gone into those things for a reason. I started learning Symfony w/o Drupal but lost interest once I found out how much easier Laravel was. They both have their advantages and disadvantages, laravel actually uses part of symfony in its code. I like the blade template system better than twig is a big factor in deciding as well. They are both very similar, but blade is closer to native PHP which makes it a little easier to learn.

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Ahmet Ertem
Ahmet Ertem
Full Stack Developer · | 5 upvotes · 517 views
Laravel
Laravel

I use Laravel because right now it's really hard to find someone using native PHP without a framework. Also learning a framework easier than native for newcomers. Also; I was not supporting frameworks before but after start developing a core with one I saw i can find many new people for the projects.

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Jigar Dhulla
Jigar Dhulla
Senior Application Developer at Endurance International Group · | 2 upvotes · 267 views
Laravel
Laravel

I use Laravel because you don't have to re-invent the wheel when compared to core PHP. We can focus directly on business logic. And the little learning curve for Laravel is worth it. Can't really compare with Laravel with Symfony as I haven't worked with Symfony yet. My suggestion would be to pick one and stick to it. If at all you have to move to other, it should be easy. Last thing I would like to add is that there are more people around who knows Laravel compared to PHP, may be that's why I started with Laravel.

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Node.js
Node.js
Laravel
Laravel
PHP
PHP
React
React
Vue.js
Vue.js

I want to create a video sharing service like Youtube, which users can use to upload and watch videos. I prefer to use Vue.js for front-end. What do you suggest for the back-end? Node.js or Laravel ( PHP ) I need a good performance with high speed, and the most important thing is the ability to handle user's requests if the site's traffic increases. I want to create an algorithm that users who watch others videos earn points (randomly but in clear context) If you have anything else to improve, please let me know. For eg: If you prefer React to Vue.js. Thanks in advance

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Interest over time
Reviews of .NET, Laravel, and Node.js
Review ofLaravelLaravel

I moved from .NET and Rails to Laravel, and since then never thought to go back. I feel Laravel framework has the capability to overcome all modern frameworks.

At Soft Pyramid we are developing rich business applications using Laravel Framework, and never feel any limitation even for complex reporting.We have written REST apis, complex ERP solutions and found awsome in all areas.

Avatar of mihaicracan
Web Developer, Freelancer
Review ofNode.jsNode.js

I have benchmarked Node.js and other popular frameworks using a real life application example. You can find the results here: https://medium.com/@mihaigeorge.c/web-rest-api-benchmark-on-a-real-life-application-ebb743a5d7a3

How developers use .NET, Laravel, and Node.js
Avatar of MaxCDN
MaxCDN uses Node.jsNode.js

We decided to move the provisioning process to an API-driven process, and had to decide among a few implementation languages:

  • Go, the server-side language from Google
  • NodeJS, an asynchronous framework in Javascript

We built prototypes in both languages, and decided on NodeJS:

  • NodeJS is asynchronous-by-default, which suited the problem domain. Provisioning is more like “start the job, let me know when you’re done” than a traditional C-style program that’s CPU-bound and needs low-level efficiency.
  • NodeJS acts as an HTTP-based service, so exposing the API was trivial

Getting into the headspace and internalizing the assumptions of a tool helps pick the right one. NodeJS assumes services will be non-blocking/event-driven and HTTP-accessible, which snapped into our scenario perfectly. The new NodeJS architecture resulted in a staggering 95% reduction in processing time: requests went from 7.5 seconds to under a second.

Avatar of Trello
Trello uses Node.jsNode.js

The server side of Trello is built in Node.js. We knew we wanted instant propagation of updates, which meant that we needed to be able to hold a lot of open connections, so an event-driven, non-blocking server seemed like a good choice. Node also turned out to be an amazing prototyping tool for a single-page app. The prototype version of the Trello server was really just a library of functions that operated on arrays of Models in the memory of a single Node.js process, and the client simply invoked those functions through a very thin wrapper over a WebSocket. This was a very fast way for us to get started trying things out with Trello and making sure that the design was headed in the right direction. We used the prototype version to manage the development of Trello and other internal projects at Fog Creek.

Avatar of AngeloR
AngeloR uses Node.jsNode.js

All backend code is done in node.js

We have a SOA for our systems. It isn't quite Microservices jsut yet, but it does provide domain encapsulation for our systems allowing the leaderboards to fail without affecting the login or education content.

We've written a few internal modules including a very simple api framework.

I ended up picking Node.js because the game client is entirely in JavaScript as well. This choice made it a lot easier for developers to cross borders between being "client side" game developers and "server side" game developers. It also meant that the pool of knowledge/best practices is applicable almost across the company.

Avatar of Tony Manso
Tony Manso uses Node.jsNode.js

Node.js is the foundation for the server. Using Express.js for serving up web content, and sockets.io for synchronizing communications between all clients and the server, the entire game runs as Javascript in Node.js.

I don't know how well this will scale if/when I have hundreds of people connected simultaneously, but I suspect that when that time comes, it may be just a matter of increasing the hardware.

As for why I chose Node.js... I just love JavaScript! My code is all original, meaning that I didn't have to inherit anyone's bad Javascript. I'm perfectly capable of creating my own bad Javascript, thank you! Also, npm rocks!

Avatar of Tarun Singh
Tarun Singh uses Node.jsNode.js

Used node.js server as backend. Interacts with MongoDB using MongoSkin package which is a wrapper for the MongoDB node.js driver. It uses express for routing and cors package for enabling cors and eyes package for enhancing readability of logs. Also I use nodemon which takes away the effort to restart the server after making changes.

Avatar of Brillium, Inc.
Brillium, Inc. uses .NET.NET

Microsoft has done an incredible job of keeping the .NET Framework powerful and stable. It is well designed and keeps getting more robust with each release. It isn't the most popular technology in this space, but I think a good case can be made to use .NET in many new projects.

Avatar of Foundbite
Foundbite uses .NET.NET

As we started on Windows Phone we use C# and .NET for most of our apps and sites. Being a small team of 2, using .NET enables us to work on each part of the service without having to switch to different languages.

Avatar of BrightMachine
BrightMachine uses LaravelLaravel

The best PHP framework right now, intuitive and growing up quickly.

We use Laravel in the outer layer of our Clean Architecture codebases, whereby the domain model does not rely on the framework as a whole.

Avatar of Kent Steiner
Kent Steiner uses LaravelLaravel

See "PHP", I don't really choose to use it, but I can step in and operate in Laravel when necessary. Same goes for quite a few other PHP frameworks, including my own full-featured proprietary stack.

Avatar of Nicholas Alexander
Nicholas Alexander uses LaravelLaravel

An excellent PHP framework employing SOLID principles to rapidly develop web-site systems and connect them to databases. Custom development of admin screens for website management.

Avatar of Doug Bromley
Doug Bromley uses LaravelLaravel

A clean, easy to understand, well documented framework with excellent tools and a great community providing every imaginable extension to add functionality to your project.

Avatar of Daniel Kovacs
Daniel Kovacs uses .NET.NET

I use .NET alongside with C# since my university studies, and I really enjoy it. Especially .NET Core, which is the best thing that happened to Microsoft since... ever.

Avatar of Jake Taylor
Jake Taylor uses LaravelLaravel

Laravel is the PHP framework we use. It speeds up development and simplifies a lot of PHP. Complicated at first but saves time once you're comfortable with it.

Avatar of Yue Wang
Yue Wang uses .NET.NET

Server side development language and frameworks: ASP.Net MVC 4, Asp.Net WebApi 2, Razor View engine, Moq, Entity Frameworks, etc.

Avatar of Twincore Systems
Twincore Systems uses .NET.NET

TwinCore creates modern web and cloud applications based on .NET TwinCore supports legacy .NET applications

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