Alternatives to Amazon Neptune logo

Alternatives to Amazon Neptune

Neo4j, GraphQL, OrientDB, JanusGraph, and Dgraph are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Amazon Neptune.
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What is Amazon Neptune and what are its top alternatives?

Amazon Neptune is a fast, reliable, fully-managed graph database service that makes it easy to build and run applications that work with highly connected datasets. The core of Amazon Neptune is a purpose-built, high-performance graph database engine optimized for storing billions of relationships and querying the graph with milliseconds latency.
Amazon Neptune is a tool in the Graph Database as a Service category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Amazon Neptune

  • Neo4j

    Neo4j

    Neo4j stores data in nodes connected by directed, typed relationships with properties on both, also known as a Property Graph. It is a high performance graph store with all the features expected of a mature and robust database, like a friendly query language and ACID transactions. ...

  • GraphQL

    GraphQL

    GraphQL is a data query language and runtime designed and used at Facebook to request and deliver data to mobile and web apps since 2012. ...

  • OrientDB

    OrientDB

    It is an open source NoSQL database management system written in Java. It is a Multi-model database, supporting graph, document, key/value, and object models, but the relationships are managed as in graph databases with direct connections between records. ...

  • JanusGraph

    JanusGraph

    It is a scalable graph database optimized for storing and querying graphs containing hundreds of billions of vertices and edges distributed across a multi-machine cluster. It is a transactional database that can support thousands of concurrent users executing complex graph traversals in real time. ...

  • Dgraph

    Dgraph

    Dgraph's goal is to provide Google production level scale and throughput, with low enough latency to be serving real time user queries, over terabytes of structured data. Dgraph supports GraphQL-like query syntax, and responds in JSON and Protocol Buffers over GRPC and HTTP. ...

  • GrapheneDB

    GrapheneDB

    With automated backups, lightning-fast provisioning, 24x7 monitoring, and best-in-class support. Available on AWS, Azure and Heroku. ...

  • TigerGraph DB

    TigerGraph DB

    It is the only scalable graph database for the enterprise which is based on the industry’s first Native and Parallel Graph technology. It unleashes the power of interconnected data, offering organizations deeper insights and better outcomes. It’s proven technology supports applications such as IoT, AI and machine learning to make sense of ever-changing big data. ...

  • Graph Story

    Graph Story

    Graph Story offers fully-managed, fast, secure and affordable access to graph databases-as-a-service and makes them even easier to use through our customized API. ...

Amazon Neptune alternatives & related posts

related Neo4j posts

We have an in-house build experiment management system. We produce samples as input to the next step, which then could produce 1 sample(1-1) and many samples (1 - many). There are many steps like this. So far, we are tracking genealogy (limited tracking) in the MySQL database, which is becoming hard to trace back to the original material or sample(I can give more details if required). So, we are considering a Graph database. I am requesting advice from the experts.

  1. Is a graph database the right choice, or can we manage with RDBMS?
  2. If RDBMS, which RDMS, which feature, or which approach could make this manageable or sustainable
  3. If Graph database(Neo4j, OrientDB, Azure Cosmos DB, Amazon Neptune, ArangoDB), which one is good, and what are the best practices?

I am sorry that this might be a loaded question.

See more

I'm evaluating the use of RedisGraph vs Microsoft SQL Server 2019 graph features to build a social graph. One of the key criteria is high availability and cross data center replication of data. While Neo4j is a much-matured solution in general, I'm not accounting for it due to the cost & introduction of a new stack in the ecosystem. Also, due to the nature of data & org policies, using a cloud-based solution won't be a viable choice.

We currently use Redis as a cache & SQL server 2019 as RDBMS.

I'm inclining towards SQL server 2019 graph as we already use SQL server extensively as relational database & have all the HA and cross data center replication setup readily available. I still need to evaluate if it fulfills our need as a graph DB though, I also learned that SQL server 2019 is still a new player in the market and attempts to fit a graph-like query on top of a relational model (with node and edge tables). RedisGraph seems very promising. However, I'm not totally sure about HA, Graph data backup, cross-data center support.

See more

related GraphQL posts

Shared insights
on
Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

  1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

  2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

  3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

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Nick Rockwell
SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 42 upvotes · 1.4M views

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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OrientDB logo

OrientDB

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An open source NoSQL database management system
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related OrientDB posts

We have an in-house build experiment management system. We produce samples as input to the next step, which then could produce 1 sample(1-1) and many samples (1 - many). There are many steps like this. So far, we are tracking genealogy (limited tracking) in the MySQL database, which is becoming hard to trace back to the original material or sample(I can give more details if required). So, we are considering a Graph database. I am requesting advice from the experts.

  1. Is a graph database the right choice, or can we manage with RDBMS?
  2. If RDBMS, which RDMS, which feature, or which approach could make this manageable or sustainable
  3. If Graph database(Neo4j, OrientDB, Azure Cosmos DB, Amazon Neptune, ArangoDB), which one is good, and what are the best practices?

I am sorry that this might be a loaded question.

See more
JanusGraph logo

JanusGraph

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Open-source, distributed graph database
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PROS OF JANUSGRAPH
    No pros available
    CONS OF JANUSGRAPH
      No cons available

      related JanusGraph posts

      Dgraph logo

      Dgraph

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      Fast, Distributed Graph DB
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      related Dgraph posts

      GrapheneDB logo

      GrapheneDB

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      Cloud-hosted Neo4j Graph Databases as a Service
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      PROS OF GRAPHENEDB
        No pros available
        CONS OF GRAPHENEDB
          No cons available

          related GrapheneDB posts

          TigerGraph DB logo

          TigerGraph DB

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          Native Parallel Graph solution that is designed for Speed and Scalability
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          PROS OF TIGERGRAPH DB
            No pros available
            CONS OF TIGERGRAPH DB
              No cons available

              related TigerGraph DB posts

              Graph Story logo

              Graph Story

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              Get your graph-backed application up & running within minutes
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              related Graph Story posts