Alternatives to nginx logo
HAProxy, lighttpd, Traefik, Caddy, and Envoy are the most popular alternatives and competitors to nginx.
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What is nginx?

nginx [engine x] is an HTTP and reverse proxy server, as well as a mail proxy server, written by Igor Sysoev. According to Netcraft nginx served or proxied 30.46% of the top million busiest sites in Jan 2018.
nginx is a tool in the Web Servers category of a tech stack.
nginx is an open source tool with 9.7K GitHub stars and 3.6K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to nginx's open source repository on GitHub

nginx alternatives & related posts

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Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 9 upvotes · 16K views
atGentlentGentlent
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
npm
npm
Varnish
Varnish
HAProxy
HAProxy
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Docker
Docker
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git

We're using Git through GitHub for public repositories and GitLab for our private repositories due to its easy to use features. Docker and Kubernetes are a must have for our highly scalable infrastructure complimented by HAProxy with Varnish in front of it. We are using a lot of npm and Visual Studio Code in our development sessions.

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StackShare Editors
StackShare Editors
| 5 upvotes · 10K views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
HAProxy
HAProxy
StatsD
StatsD
nginx
nginx

The frontline API is proxied through a HAProxy load balancer with NGINX as the fronted, which also handles SSL termination. This frontline API consist of 600 stateless endpoints that join together multiple services.

As part of the Marketplace stack, engineers in this area integrate with various other internal services, including logtron to log to disk and Kafka and uber-statsd-client, the Node.js client for statsd.

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lighttpd logo

lighttpd

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A secure, fast, compliant, and very flexible web-server that has been optimized for high-performance environments
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Caddy logo

Caddy

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The HTTP/2 Web Server with Automatic HTTPS
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Scott Mebberson
Scott Mebberson
CTO / Chief Architect at Idearium · | 5 upvotes · 11.8K views
Caddy
Caddy
nginx
nginx

We used to primarily use nginx for our static web server and proxy in-front of Node.js. Now, we use Caddy. And we couldn't be happier.

Caddy is simpler on all fronts. Configuration is easier. Free HTTPS out of the box. Some fantastic plugins. And for the most part, it's fast.

Don't get me wrong, it's not lost on me that Nginx is actually a superior product.

But for the times when you don't need that extra performance, and complexity - take a look at Caddy.

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Envoy logo

Envoy

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C++ front/service proxy
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related Varnish posts

Tom Klein
Tom Klein
CEO at Gentlent · | 9 upvotes · 16K views
atGentlentGentlent
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
npm
npm
Varnish
Varnish
HAProxy
HAProxy
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Docker
Docker
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git

We're using Git through GitHub for public repositories and GitLab for our private repositories due to its easy to use features. Docker and Kubernetes are a must have for our highly scalable infrastructure complimented by HAProxy with Varnish in front of it. We are using a lot of npm and Visual Studio Code in our development sessions.

See more
StackShare Editors
StackShare Editors
HAProxy
HAProxy
Varnish
Varnish
Tornado
Tornado
Django
Django
Redis
Redis
RabbitMQ
RabbitMQ
nginx
nginx
Memcached
Memcached
MySQL
MySQL
Python
Python
Node.js
Node.js

Around the time of their Series A, Pinterest’s stack included Python and Django, with Tornado and Node.js as web servers. Memcached / Membase and Redis handled caching, with RabbitMQ handling queueing. Nginx, HAproxy and Varnish managed static-delivery and load-balancing, with persistent data storage handled by MySQL.

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Apache Tomcat logo

Apache Tomcat

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An open source software implementation of the Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages technologies
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MySQL
MySQL
Apache Tomcat
Apache Tomcat
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
JUnit
JUnit
Spring
Spring
Java
Java

Java Spring JUnit

Apache HTTP Server Apache Tomcat

MySQL

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Node.js logo

Node.js

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A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
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Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 33 upvotes · 110.6K views
atStreamStream
Go
Go
Stream
Stream
Python
Python
Yarn
Yarn
Babel
Babel
Node.js
Node.js
ES6
ES6
JavaScript
JavaScript
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times · | 26 upvotes · 197.5K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
Kafka
Kafka
Node.js
Node.js
GraphQL
GraphQL
Apollo
Apollo
React
React
PHP
PHP
MySQL
MySQL

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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Apache HTTP Server logo

Apache HTTP Server

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The most popular web server on the Internet since April 1996
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Marcel Kornegoor
Marcel Kornegoor
CTO at AT Computing · | 6 upvotes · 3.5K views
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
nginx
nginx

nginx or Apache HTTP Server that's the question. The best choice depends on what it needs to serve. In general, Nginx performs better with static content, where Apache and Nginx score roughly the same when it comes to dynamic content. Since most webpages and web-applications use both static and dynamic content, a combination of both platforms may be the best solution.

Since both webservers are easy to deploy and free to use, setting up a performance or feature comparison test is no big deal. This way you can see what solutions suits your application or content best. Don't forget to look at other aspects, like security, back-end compatibility (easy of integration) and manageability, as well.

A reasonably good comparison between the two can be found in the link below.

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Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 4 upvotes · 27.5K views
atZulipZulip
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
nginx
nginx

We've been happy with nginx as part of our stack. As an open source web application that folks install on-premise, the configuration system for the webserver is pretty important to us. I have a few complaints (e.g. the configuration syntax for conditionals is a pain), but overall we've found it pretty easy to build a configurable set of options (see link) for how to run Zulip on nginx, both directly and with a remote reverse proxy in front of it, with a minimum of code duplication.

Certainly I've been a lot happier with it than I was working with Apache HTTP Server in past projects.

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OpenResty logo

OpenResty

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Turning Nginx into a Full-fledged Web App Server
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    Chris McFadden
    Chris McFadden
    VP, Engineering at SparkPost · | 7 upvotes · 30.2K views
    atSparkPostSparkPost
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    We use nginx and OpenResty as our API proxy running on EC2 for auth, caching, and some rate limiting for our dozens of microservices. Since OpenResty support embedded Lua we were able to write a custom access module that calls out to our authentication service with the resource, method, and access token. If that succeeds then critical account info is passed down to the underlying microservice. This proxy approach keeps all authentication and authorization in one place and provides a unified CX for our API users. Nginx is fast and cheap to run though we are always exploring alternatives that are also economical. What do you use?

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    Go
    Go
    Lua
    Lua
    OpenResty
    OpenResty
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    nginx
    Logstash
    Logstash
    Prometheus
    Prometheus

    At Kong while building an internal tool, we struggled to route metrics to Prometheus and logs to Logstash without incurring too much latency in our metrics collection.

    We replaced nginx with OpenResty on the edge of our tool which allowed us to use the lua-nginx-module to run Lua code that captures metrics and records telemetry data during every request’s log phase. Our code then pushes the metrics to a local aggregator process (written in Go) which in turn exposes them in Prometheus Exposition Format for consumption by Prometheus. This solution reduced the number of components we needed to maintain and is fast thanks to NGINX and LuaJIT.

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    LiteSpeed

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    A drop-in Apache replacement and the leading high-performance, high-scalability server
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      Gunicorn logo

      Gunicorn

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      A Python WSGI HTTP Server for UNIX
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      I use Gunicorn because does one thing - it’s a WSGI HTTP server - and it does it well. Deploy it quickly and easily, and let the rest of your stack do what the rest of your stack does well, wherever that may be.

      uWSGI “aims at developing a full stack for building hosting services” - if that’s a thing you need then ok, but I like the principle of doing one thing well, and I deploy to platforms like Heroku and AWS Elastic Beanstalk where the rest of the “hosting service” is provided and managed for me.

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      Cowboy logo

      Cowboy

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      Small, fast, modular HTTP server written in Erlang.
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      Unicorn logo

      Unicorn

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      Rack HTTP server for fast clients and Unix
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      Simon Bettison
      Simon Bettison
      Managing Director at Bettison.org Limited · | 6 upvotes · 58.5K views
      atBettison.org LimitedBettison.org Limited
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      Amazon EC2 Container Service
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      Docker
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      Amazon VPC
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      Amazon Route 53
      Amazon SQS
      Amazon SQS
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      Amazon CloudFront
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      Ruby
      Ruby
      Travis CI
      Travis CI
      Selenium
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      Rails
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Amazon ElastiCache
      Redis
      Redis
      Sidekiq
      Sidekiq
      Elasticsearch
      Elasticsearch
      PostgreSQL
      PostgreSQL

      In 2010 we made the very difficult decision to entirely re-engineer our existing monolithic LAMP application from the ground up in order to address some growing concerns about it's long term viability as a platform.

      Full application re-write is almost always never the answer, because of the risks involved. However the situation warranted drastic action as it was clear that the existing product was going to face severe scaling issues. We felt it better address these sooner rather than later and also take the opportunity to improve the international architecture and also to refactor the database in. order that it better matched the changes in core functionality.

      PostgreSQL was chosen for its reputation as being solid ACID compliant database backend, it was available as an offering AWS RDS service which reduced the management overhead of us having to configure it ourselves. In order to reduce read load on the primary database we implemented an Elasticsearch layer for fast and scalable search operations. Synchronisation of these indexes was to be achieved through the use of Sidekiq's Redis based background workers on Amazon ElastiCache. Again the AWS solution here looked to be an easy way to keep our involvement in managing this part of the platform at a minimum. Allowing us to focus on our core business.

      Rails ls was chosen for its ability to quickly get core functionality up and running, its MVC architecture and also its focus on Test Driven Development using RSpec and Selenium with Travis CI providing continual integration. We also liked Ruby for its terse, clean and elegant syntax. Though YMMV on that one!

      Unicorn was chosen for its continual deployment and reputation as a reliable application server, nginx for its reputation as a fast and stable reverse-proxy. We also took advantage of the Amazon CloudFront CDN here to further improve performance by caching static assets globally.

      We tried to strike a balance between having control over management and configuration of our core application with the convenience of being able to leverage AWS hosted services for ancillary functions (Amazon SES , Amazon SQS Amazon Route 53 all hosted securely inside Amazon VPC of course!).

      Whilst there is some compromise here with potential vendor lock in, the tasks being performed by these ancillary services are no particularly specialised which should mitigate this risk. Furthermore we have already containerised the stack in our development using Docker environment, and looking to how best to bring this into production - potentially using Amazon EC2 Container Service

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      Jerome Dalbert
      Jerome Dalbert
      Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 6 upvotes · 6.6K views
      atStackShareStackShare
      Rails
      Rails
      Puma
      Puma
      Unicorn
      Unicorn

      We switched from Unicorn (process model) to Puma (threaded model) to decrease the memory footprint of our Rails production web server. Memory indeed dropped from 6GB to only 1GB!

      We just had to decrease our worker count and increase our thread count instead. Performance (response time and throughput) remained the same, if not slightly better. We had no thread-safety errors, which was good.

      Free bonus points are:

      • Requests are blazing fast on our dev and staging environments!
      • Puma has first-class support for WebSockets, so we know for sure that Rails ActionCable or GraphQL subscriptions will work great.
      • Being on Puma makes us even more "default Rails"-compliant since it is the default Rails web server these days.
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      Jetty logo

      Jetty

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      An open-source project providing an HTTP server, HTTP client, and javax.servlet container
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      Puma

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      A Modern, Concurrent Web Server for Ruby
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      Jerome Dalbert
      Jerome Dalbert
      Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 6 upvotes · 6.6K views
      atStackShareStackShare
      Rails
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      Puma
      Unicorn
      Unicorn

      We switched from Unicorn (process model) to Puma (threaded model) to decrease the memory footprint of our Rails production web server. Memory indeed dropped from 6GB to only 1GB!

      We just had to decrease our worker count and increase our thread count instead. Performance (response time and throughput) remained the same, if not slightly better. We had no thread-safety errors, which was good.

      Free bonus points are:

      • Requests are blazing fast on our dev and staging environments!
      • Puma has first-class support for WebSockets, so we know for sure that Rails ActionCable or GraphQL subscriptions will work great.
      • Being on Puma makes us even more "default Rails"-compliant since it is the default Rails web server these days.
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      Wildfly logo

      Wildfly

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      A Java EE8 Application Server
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      JBoss logo

      JBoss

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      An open-source Java EE-based application server
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