Alternatives to Slack logo

Alternatives to Slack

Microsoft Teams, Discord, Trello, Skype, and Asana are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Slack.
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What is Slack and what are its top alternatives?

Imagine all your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That’s Slack. All your messages. All your files. And everything from Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, Asana, Trello, GitHub and dozens of other services. All together.
Slack is a tool in the Group Chat & Notifications category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Slack

  • Microsoft Teams
    Microsoft Teams

    See content and chat history anytime, including team chats with Skype that are visible to the whole team. Private group chats are available for smaller group conversations. ...

  • Discord
    Discord

    Discord is a modern free voice & text chat app for groups of gamers. Our resilient Erlang backend running on the cloud has built in DDoS protection with automatic server failover. ...

  • Trello
    Trello

    Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, Trello tells you what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process. ...

  • Skype
    Skype

    Skype’s text, voice and video make it simple to share experiences with the people that matter to you, wherever they are. ...

  • Asana
    Asana

    Asana is the easiest way for teams to track their work. From tasks and projects to conversations and dashboards, Asana enables teams to move work from start to finish--and get results. Available at asana.com and on iOS & Android. ...

  • Yammer
    Yammer

    Yammer brings the power of social networking to your company. Collaborate securely across departments, geographies, content and business applications. ...

  • Basecamp
    Basecamp

    Basecamp is a project management and group collaboration tool. The tool includes features for schedules, tasks, files, and messages. ...

  • Mattermost
    Mattermost

    Mattermost is modern communication from behind your firewall.

Slack alternatives & related posts

Microsoft Teams logo

Microsoft Teams

2.3K
1.6K
138
Chat-based workspace in Office 365
2.3K
1.6K
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PROS OF MICROSOFT TEAMS
  • 28
    Work well with the rest of Office 365 work flow
  • 23
    Mobile friendly
  • 19
    Free
  • 12
    Great integrations
  • 11
    Well-thought Design
  • 10
    Channels
  • 8
    Easy setup
  • 6
    Unlimited users
  • 5
    Strong search and data archiving
  • 4
    Multi domain switching support
  • 4
    Easy to integrate with
  • 3
    Same interface on multiple platforms
  • 3
    Web interface
  • 2
    Great voice quality
CONS OF MICROSOFT TEAMS
  • 17
    Confusing UI
  • 12
    Bad performance on init and after quite a use
  • 10
    Bad Usermanagement
  • 6
    No desktop client (only fat and slow electron app)
  • 6
    Can't see all members in a video meeting
  • 5
    Unable to Mute users
  • 5
    No Markdown Support
  • 4
    You don't really own your messages
  • 4
    MIssing public channels
  • 4
    Forced WYSIWYG
  • 3
    Stubborn, unused friendly
  • 3
    Challenging Onboarding
  • 3
    No linux support
  • 1
    Audio support problems

related Microsoft Teams posts

Jon Waite
Scrum Master at Costco Wholsale · | 3 upvotes · 81.9K views

Looking for the pros and cons for a tool we can use best for cross-team collaboration (software development). Has anyone compared Google Hangouts Chat with Microsoft Teams? What were the advantages of either??

See more
Jack Graves

We use Microsoft Teams as our primary workplace collaboration tool. It enables our team to work remotely and still collaborate on projects - with integration to JIRA and Confluence, the tool enables us to create War Rooms when problems occur and also provides information-sharing capabilities. Replaced HipChat.

See more
Discord logo

Discord

1.7K
1.5K
806
All-in-one voice and text chat for gamers that’s free, secure, and works on both your desktop and phone
1.7K
1.5K
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806
PROS OF DISCORD
  • 65
    Unlimited Users
  • 59
    Unlimited Channels
  • 55
    Easy to use
  • 51
    Voice Chat
  • 49
    Fast and easy set-ups and connections
  • 46
    Clean UI
  • 43
    Mobile Friendly
  • 43
    Free
  • 33
    Android App
  • 29
    Mention system
  • 27
    Customizable notifications on per channel basis
  • 26
    Customizable ranks/permissions
  • 22
    IOS app
  • 21
    Good code embedding
  • 19
    Vast Webhook Support
  • 16
    Dark mode
  • 14
    Easy context switching between work and home
  • 14
    Roles
  • 13
    Great Communities
  • 12
    Very Resource Friendly
  • 12
    Robust
  • 12
    Easy to develop for
  • 12
    Great Customer Support
  • 12
    Bot control
  • 11
    Video Call Conference
  • 11
    Video call meeting
  • 10
    Able to hold 99 people in one call
  • 10
    Sharing screen layer
  • 9
    Easy
  • 9
    Great browser experience
  • 9
    Shares screen with other member
  • 9
    Easy Server Setup and joining system
  • 7
    Lower bandwidth requirements than competitors
  • 7
    Easy to code bots for
  • 6
    Noice
  • 3
    Easily set up custom emoji
CONS OF DISCORD
  • 10
    Not as many integrations as Slack
  • 9
    For gamers
  • 5
    Limited file size
  • 4
    Sends data to US Gov
  • 4
    For everyone
  • 2
    Undescriptive in global ban reasons
  • 2
    Suspected Pedophiles in few servers
  • 1
    Unsupportive Support
  • 1
    High memory and CPU footprint

related Discord posts

Josh Dzielak
Co-Founder & CTO at Orbit · | 19 upvotes · 429K views

Shortly after I joined Algolia as a developer advocate, I knew I wanted to establish a place for the community to congregate and share their projects, questions and advice. There are a ton of platforms out there that can be used to host communities, and they tend to fall into two categories - real-time sync (like chat) and async (like forums). Because the community was already large, I felt that a chat platform like Discord or Gitter might be overwhelming and opted for a forum-like solution instead (which would also create content that's searchable from Google).

I looked at paid, closed-source options like AnswerHub and ForumBee and old-school solutions like phpBB and vBulletin, but none seemed to offer the power, flexibility and developer-friendliness of Discourse. Discourse is open source, written in Rails with Ember.js on the front-end. That made me confident I could modify it to meet our exact needs. Discourse's own forum is very active which made me confident I could get help if I needed it.

It took about a month to get Discourse up-and-running and make authentication tied to algolia.com via the SSO plugin. Adding additional plugins for moderation or look-and-feel customization was fairly straightforward, and I even created a plugin to make the forum content searchable with Algolia. To stay on top of answering questions and moderation, we used the Discourse API to publish new messages into our Slack. All-in-all I would say we were happy with Discourse - the only caveat would be that it's very helpful to have technical knowledge as well as Rails knowledge in order to get the most out of it.

See more

From a StackShare Community member: “We’re about to start a chat group for our open source project (over 5K stars on GitHub) so we can let our community collaborate more closely. The obvious choice would be Slack (k8s and a ton of major projects use it), but we’ve seen Gitter (webpack uses it) for a lot of open source projects, Discord (Vue.js moved to them), and as of late I’m seeing Spectrum more and more often. Does anyone have experience with these or other alternatives? Is it even worth assessing all these options, or should we just go with Slack? Some things that are important to us: free, all the regular integrations (GitHub, Heroku, etc), mobile & desktop apps, and open source is of course a plus."

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Trello logo

Trello

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33.1K
3.7K
Your entire project, in a single glance
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PROS OF TRELLO
  • 715
    Great for collaboration
  • 628
    Easy to use
  • 573
    Free
  • 375
    Fast
  • 347
    Realtime
  • 237
    Intuitive
  • 215
    Visualizing
  • 169
    Flexible
  • 126
    Fun user interface
  • 83
    Snappy and blazing fast
  • 30
    Simple, intuitive UI that gets out of your way
  • 27
    Kanban
  • 21
    Clean Interface
  • 18
    Easy setup
  • 18
    Card Structure
  • 17
    Drag and drop attachments
  • 11
    Simple
  • 10
    Markdown commentary on cards
  • 9
    Lists
  • 9
    Integration with other work collaborative apps
  • 8
    Satisfying User Experience
  • 8
    Cross-Platform Integration
  • 7
    Recognizes GitHub commit links
  • 6
    Easy to learn
  • 5
    Great
  • 4
    Better than email
  • 4
    Versatile Team & Project Management
  • 3
    and lots of integrations
  • 3
    Trello’s Developmental Transparency
  • 3
    Effective
  • 2
    Easy
  • 2
    Powerful
  • 2
    Agile
  • 2
    Easy to have an overview of the project status
  • 2
    flexible and fast
  • 2
    Simple and intuitive
  • 1
    Name rolls of the tongue
  • 1
    Customizable
  • 1
    Email integration
  • 1
    Personal organisation
  • 1
    Nice
  • 1
    Great organizing (of events/tasks)
  • 0
    Easiest way to visually express the scope of projects
CONS OF TRELLO
  • 5
    No concept of velocity or points
  • 4
    Very light native integrations
  • 2
    A little too flexible

related Trello posts

Johnny Bell

So I am a huge fan of JIRA like #massive I used it for many many years, and really loved it, used it personally and at work. I would suggest every new workplace that I worked at to switch to JIRA instead of what I was using.

When I started at #StackShare we were using a Trello #Kanban board and I was so shocked at how easy the workflow was to follow, create new tasks and get tasks QA'd and deployed. What was so great about this was it didn't come with all the complexity of JIRA. Like setting up a project, user rules etc. You are able to hit the ground running with Trello and get tasks started right away without being overwhelmed with the complexity of options in JIRA

With a few TrelloPowerUps we were easily able to add GitHub integration and storyPoints to our cards and thats all we needed to get a really nice agile workflow going.

I'm not saying that JIRA is not useful, I can see larger companies being able to use the JIRA features and have the time to go through all the complex setup to get a really good workflow going. But for smaller #Startups that want to hit the ground running Trello for me is the way to go.

In saying that what I would love Trello to implement is to allow me to create custom fields. Right now we just have a Description field. So I am adding User Stories & How To Test in the Markdown of the Description if I could have these as custom fields then my #Agile workflow would be complete.

#StackDecisionsLaunch

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Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
Telecomm Engineering at Netbeast · | 15 upvotes · 432.2K views

This time I want to share something different. For those that have read my stack decisions, it's normal to expect some advice on infrastructure or React Native. Lately my mind has been focusing more on product as a experience than what's it made of (anatomy). As a tech leader, I have to worry about things like: are we taking enough time for reviews? Are we improving over time? Are we faster now? Is our code of higher quality?

For all these questions you can add many great recommendations on your pipeline. We use Trello for bug-tracking and project management. We use https://danger.systems/js/ to add checks for linting, type-enforcing and other quality dimensions in our PRs and a great feature from Vercel that let's you previsualize deployments directly in a PR. However it's not easy to measure this improvements over time. For customer matters we have Amplitude or Firebase analytics, but for our internal process? That's a little bit more complicated.

I collaborated recently with some folks in a small startup as an early adopter to create a metrics dashboard for engineers. I tried to add the tool to stackshare.io but still it doesn't appear as one of the options, please take a look on it over product hunt and let us know https://www.producthunt.com/posts/scope-6

See more
Skype logo

Skype

16.8K
13.2K
653
Voice calls, instant messaging, file transfer, and video conferencing
16.8K
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653
PROS OF SKYPE
  • 258
    Free, widespread
  • 147
    Desktop and mobile apps
  • 110
    Because i have to :(
  • 57
    Low cost international calling
  • 56
    Good for international calls
  • 10
    Best call quality anywhere, generally
  • 5
    Beautiful emojis
  • 4
    Chat bots
  • 2
    Translator
  • 2
    Skype for business integration with Outlook
  • 1
    United kingdom
  • 1
    Not the Best, but get the job done
CONS OF SKYPE
  • 5
    Really high CPU utilization during video/screenshare
  • 3
    Not always reliable
  • 3
    Outdated UI
  • 3
    Birthday notifications are annoying
  • 3
    The worst indicator noises of any app ever
  • 2
    Finding/adding people isn't easy

related Skype posts

Dmitry Mukhin

Uploadcare is mostly remote team and we're using video conferencing all the time both for internal team meetings and for external sales, support, interview, etc. calls. I think we've tried every solution there is on the market before we've decided to stop with Zoom.

Tools just plainly don't work (Skype), are painful to install for external participants (Webex and other "enterprise" solutions) can't properly handle 10+ participants calls (Google Hangouts Chat).

Zoom just works. It has all required features and even handles bad connections very graciously. One of the best tool decisions we've ever made :)

See more
Mark Nelissen

I use Slack because it offers the best experience, even on the free tier (which we're still using). As a comparison, I have had in depth experience with HipChat, Stride, Skype, Google Chat (the new service), Google Hangouts (the old service). For self hosted, Mattermost is open source and claims to support most Slack integrations, but I have not extensively investigated this claim.

See more
Asana logo

Asana

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7.1K
655
Enabling the teams to work together effortlessly
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655
PROS OF ASANA
  • 160
    Super fast task creation
  • 150
    Flexible project management
  • 101
    Free up to 15
  • 99
    Followers and commenting on tasks
  • 57
    Integration with external services
  • 25
    Email-based task creation
  • 17
    Plays nice with Google Apps
  • 14
    Clear usage
  • 14
    Plays nice with Harvest Time Tracking
  • 6
    Supports nice keyboard shortcuts
  • 4
    Integration with GitHub
  • 2
    Slack supported
  • 2
    Integration with Instagantt for Gantt Charts
  • 1
    Integration with Alfred
  • 1
    Both Card View & Task View
  • 1
    Easy to use
  • 1
    Friendly API
  • 0
    Slick and fast interface
CONS OF ASANA
  • 0
    Not Cross Platform

related Asana posts

Lucas Litton
Founder & CEO at Macombey · | 24 upvotes · 271.7K views

Sentry has been essential to our development approach. Nobody likes errors or apps that crash. We use Sentry heavily during Node.js and React development. Our developers are able to see error reports, crashes, user's browsers, and more, all in one place. Sentry also seamlessly integrates with Asana, Slack, and GitHub.

See more
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 1.2M views

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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Yammer logo

Yammer

75
68
0
Yammer is a Private Social Network for Your Company
75
68
+ 1
0
PROS OF YAMMER
  • 0
    By microsoft
CONS OF YAMMER
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Yammer posts

    Basecamp logo

    Basecamp

    645
    498
    210
    The leading web-based project management and collaboration tool.
    645
    498
    + 1
    210
    PROS OF BASECAMP
    • 71
      Team collaboration (non-tech)
    • 39
      It's simple and intuitive
    • 24
      Great UI
    • 20
      Plain, simple
    • 15
      Very fast
    • 12
      Clear pricing
    • 9
      Super fast task creation
    • 7
      Integration with external services
    • 4
      iPhone app
    • 4
      Frequent + awesome updates
    • 1
      Remote management
    • 1
      As close to an all-in-one tool that is client friendly
    • 1
      Team collaboration
    • 1
      Team and client collaboration
    • 1
      Plays nice with Google Apps
    CONS OF BASECAMP
    • 3
      Basic

    related Basecamp posts

    Kirill Shirinkin
    Cloud and DevOps Consultant at mkdev · | 12 upvotes · 681.1K views

    As a small startup we are very conscious about picking up the tools we use to run the project. After suffering with a mess of using at the same time Trello , Slack , Telegram and what not, we arrived at a small set of tools that cover all our current needs. For product management, file sharing, team communication etc we chose Basecamp and couldn't be more happy about it. For Customer Support and Sales Intercom works amazingly well. We are using MailChimp for email marketing since over 4 years and it still covers all our needs. Then on payment side combination of Stripe and Octobat helps us to process all the payments and generate compliant invoices. On techie side we use Rollbar and GitLab (for both code and CI). For corporate email we picked G Suite. That all costs us in total around 300$ a month, which is quite okay.

    See more
    Blair Gemmer
    Software Engineer at VYNYL · | 2 upvotes · 55.5K views
    Shared insights
    on
    JiraJiraBasecampBasecampAsanaAsanaTrelloTrello
    at

    Jira is better than any other project management tool I've used, including Basecamp Asana and Trello . However, Trello has a much different purpose to me and is still amazing!

    See more
    Mattermost logo

    Mattermost

    479
    577
    302
    Open-source, self-hosted, Slack alternative
    479
    577
    + 1
    302
    PROS OF MATTERMOST
    • 60
      Open source
    • 41
      On-premise deployment
    • 26
      Free
    • 22
      Built using golang
    • 21
      Fast and easy to use
    • 14
      Docker image provided for easy setup
    • 14
      Full text search
    • 12
      Built using react
    • 11
      Supports multiple teams
    • 11
      Search and data archiving
    • 11
      Very professional
    • 8
      Keeps us focused, effective, concise
    • 7
      Clean and simple look
    • 7
      Integration with Gitlab
    • 7
      Webhooks support
    • 6
      Well documented
    • 6
      Use #Hashtags like Twitter
    • 3
      Import Slack logs
    • 3
      Reactive community and ease of use
    • 2
      Self managed data
    • 2
      On-premises Deployment
    • 2
      Secure
    • 1
      Markdown support
    • 1
      On premise installation
    • 1
      Kanban
    • 1
      Checklists
    • 1
      Slack-compatible integrations
    • 1
      Easy webhook integration
    CONS OF MATTERMOST
    • 2
      Less integrations and plugins than slack
    • 2
      Many basic features are enterprise only
    • 2
      Custom sidewide themes only in enterprise
    • 1
      Basic permissions only in enterprise edition
    • 1
      Not compatible with Telegram keys, which used by FSB

    related Mattermost posts

    Mark Nelissen

    I use Slack because it offers the best experience, even on the free tier (which we're still using). As a comparison, I have had in depth experience with HipChat, Stride, Skype, Google Chat (the new service), Google Hangouts (the old service). For self hosted, Mattermost is open source and claims to support most Slack integrations, but I have not extensively investigated this claim.

    See more
    rishig
    Head of Product at Zulip · | 5 upvotes · 155.7K views

    I use Zulip instead of Slack, Mattermost, or RocketChat because of its first class threading. One week after switching to Gmail (in 2004) I realized I was never (willingly) going to use an unthreaded email product again. I had that same experience the first time I saw Zulip.

    Zulip is also fully open-source, with a well-maintained (e.g. 90+% test coverage, fully static python), easily extensible code-base. In many companies, your communication platform (chat or email) is the center of the workplace -- no one asks for a chat integration into their calendar, they ask for a calendar integration into their chat. A fully open-source codebase means you can customize Zulip to your needs, and are never at the whim of a corporate maintainer who can't or won't fix simple bugs, or who will charge you tens of thousands of dollars for making minor customizations.

    See more