Alternatives to Hogan.js logo

Alternatives to Hogan.js

EJS, TypeScript, Handlebars.js, Mustache, and Pug are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Hogan.js.
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What is Hogan.js and what are its top alternatives?

Hogan.js is a 3.4k JS templating engine developed at Twitter. Use it as a part of your asset packager to compile templates ahead of time or include it in your browser to handle dynamic templates.
Hogan.js is a tool in the Templating Languages & Extensions category of a tech stack.
Hogan.js is an open source tool with 5.1K GitHub stars and 450 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Hogan.js's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Hogan.js

  • EJS

    EJS

    It is a simple templating language that lets you generate HTML markup with plain JavaScript. No religiousness about how to organize things. No reinvention of iteration and control-flow. It's just plain JavaScript. ...

  • TypeScript

    TypeScript

    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. ...

  • Handlebars.js

    Handlebars.js

    Handlebars.js is an extension to the Mustache templating language created by Chris Wanstrath. Handlebars.js and Mustache are both logicless templating languages that keep the view and the code separated like we all know they should be. ...

  • Mustache

    Mustache

    Mustache is a logic-less template syntax. It can be used for HTML, config files, source code - anything. It works by expanding tags in a template using values provided in a hash or object. We call it "logic-less" because there are no if statements, else clauses, or for loops. Instead there are only tags. Some tags are replaced with a value, some nothing, and others a series of values. ...

  • Pug

    Pug

    This project was formerly known as "Jade." Pug is a high performance template engine heavily influenced by Haml and implemented with JavaScript for Node.js and browsers. ...

  • Smarty

    Smarty

    Facilitating the separation of presentation (HTML/CSS) from application logic. This implies that PHP code is application logic, and is separated from the presentation ...

  • Jinja

    Jinja

    It is a full featured template engine for Python. It has full unicode support, an optional integrated sandboxed execution environment, widely used and BSD licensed. ...

  • Flow (JS)

    Flow (JS)

    Flow is a static type checker for Javascript created by Facebook.

Hogan.js alternatives & related posts

EJS logo

EJS

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190
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An Embedded JavaScript templating Language
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+ 1
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PROS OF EJS
  • 4
    It'a easy to understand the concept behind it
  • 4
    For a beginner it's just plain javascript code
  • 2
    Quick for templating UI project
  • 1
    You almost know how to use it from start
  • 1
    Çelik ayna
CONS OF EJS
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    related EJS posts

    TypeScript logo

    TypeScript

    44.2K
    34.4K
    462
    A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output
    44.2K
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    PROS OF TYPESCRIPT
    • 163
      More intuitive and type safe javascript
    • 97
      Type safe
    • 73
      JavaScript superset
    • 46
      The best AltJS ever
    • 27
      Best AltJS for BackEnd
    • 14
      Powerful type system, including generics & JS features
    • 10
      Nice and seamless hybrid of static and dynamic typing
    • 9
      Aligned with ES development for compatibility
    • 9
      Compile time errors
    • 6
      Structural, rather than nominal, subtyping
    • 5
      Angular
    • 3
      Starts and ends with JavaScript
    CONS OF TYPESCRIPT
    • 4
      Code may look heavy and confusing
    • 2
      Hype

    related TypeScript posts

    Yshay Yaacobi

    Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

    Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

    After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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    Jonathan Pugh
    Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 25 upvotes · 1.5M views

    I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

    For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

    Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

    I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

    I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

    I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

    I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

    For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

    For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

    For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

    I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

    So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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    Handlebars.js logo

    Handlebars.js

    5.6K
    2.2K
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    Minimal Templating on Steroids
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    PROS OF HANDLEBARS.JS
    • 106
      Simple
    • 77
      Great templating language
    • 51
      Open source
    • 36
      Logicless
    • 20
      Integrates well into any codebase
    • 10
      Easy to create helper methods for complex scenarios
    • 7
      Created by Yehuda Katz
    • 2
      Easy For Fornt End Developers,learn backend
    • 1
      Awesome
    • 0
      W
    CONS OF HANDLEBARS.JS
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      related Handlebars.js posts

      Mustache logo

      Mustache

      1.4K
      330
      50
      Logic-less templates
      1.4K
      330
      + 1
      50
      PROS OF MUSTACHE
      • 29
        Dead simple templating
      • 12
        Open source
      • 8
        Small
      • 1
        Support in lots of languages
      CONS OF MUSTACHE
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        related Mustache posts

        Pug logo

        Pug

        1.1K
        1K
        422
        Robust, elegant, feature rich template engine for nodejs
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        1K
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        PROS OF PUG
        • 131
          Elegant html
        • 87
          Great with nodejs
        • 55
          Very short syntax
        • 54
          Open source
        • 51
          Structured with indentation
        • 22
          Free
        • 4
          Gulp
        • 4
          It's not HAML
        • 3
          Really similar to Slim (from Ruby fame)
        • 3
          Easy setup
        • 3
          Difficult For Front End Developers,learn backend
        • 2
          Readable code
        • 2
          Clean syntax
        • 1
          Disdain for angled brackets
        CONS OF PUG
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          Smarty logo

          Smarty

          245
          50
          0
          Template engine for PHP
          245
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          + 1
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          PROS OF SMARTY
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            CONS OF SMARTY
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              Jinja logo

              Jinja

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              6
              Full featured template engine for Python
              193
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              + 1
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              PROS OF JINJA
              • 6
                It is simple to use
              CONS OF JINJA
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                related Jinja posts

                I have learned both Python and JavaScript. I also tried my hand at Django. But i found it difficult to work with Django, on frontend its Jinja format is very confusing and limited. I have not tried Node.js yet and unsure which tool to go ahead with. I want an internship as soon as possible so please answer keeping that in mind.

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                Flow (JS) logo

                Flow (JS)

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                Flow is a static type checker for Javascript (by Facebook)
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                PROS OF FLOW (JS)
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                  CONS OF FLOW (JS)
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                    Shared insights
                    on
                    TypeScript
                    Flow (JS)

                    I use TypeScript because it isn't just about validating the types I'm expecting to receive though that is a huge part of it too. Flow (JS) seems to be a type system only. TypeScript also allows you to use the latest features of JavaScript while also providing the type checking. To be fair to Flow (JS), I have not used it, but likely wouldn't have due to the additional features I get from TypeScript.

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                    David Koblas
                    VP Engineering at Payment Rails · | 9 upvotes · 59.1K views

                    We originally (in 2017) started rewriting our platform from JavaScript to Flow (JS) but found the library support for Flow was lacking. After switching gears to TypeScript we've never looked back. At this point we're finding that frontend and backend libraries are supporting TypeScript out of the box and where the support is missing that the commuity is typically got a solution in hand.

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