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Alternatives to MongoLab

MongoDB, Compose, MongoDB Atlas, and ScaleGrid are the most popular alternatives and competitors to MongoLab.
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What is MongoLab and what are its top alternatives?

mLab is the largest cloud MongoDB service in the world, hosting over a half million deployments on AWS, Azure, and Google.
MongoLab is a tool in the MongoDB Hosting category of a tech stack.

MongoLab alternatives & related posts

related MongoDB posts

Jeyabalaji Subramanian
Jeyabalaji Subramanian
CTO at FundsCorner · | 24 upvotes · 199.7K views
atFundsCornerFundsCorner
Zappa
Zappa
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
SQLAlchemy
SQLAlchemy
Python
Python
Amazon SQS
Amazon SQS
Node.js
Node.js
MongoDB Stitch
MongoDB Stitch
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MongoDB
MongoDB

Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

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Robert Zuber
Robert Zuber
CTO at CircleCI · | 22 upvotes · 89.7K views
atCircleCICircleCI
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
GitHub
GitHub
Redis
Redis
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MongoDB
MongoDB

We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

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related Compose posts

Gregory Koberger
Gregory Koberger
Founder · | 12 upvotes · 50.1K views
atReadMe.ioReadMe.io
Compose
Compose
MongoLab
MongoLab
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB Atlas
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MySQL
MySQL
MongoDB
MongoDB

We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

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related MongoDB Atlas posts

Gregory Koberger
Gregory Koberger
Founder · | 12 upvotes · 50.1K views
atReadMe.ioReadMe.io
Compose
Compose
MongoLab
MongoLab
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB Atlas
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MySQL
MySQL
MongoDB
MongoDB

We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

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Jeyabalaji Subramanian
Jeyabalaji Subramanian
CTO at FundsCorner · | 11 upvotes · 17.3K views
atFundsCornerFundsCorner
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB Atlas
MongoDB
MongoDB
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL

Database is at the heart of any technology stack. It is no wonder we spend a lot of time choosing the right database before we dive deep into product building.

When we were faced with the question of what database to choose, we set the following criteria: The database must (1) Have a very high transaction throughput. We wanted to err on the side of "reads" but not on the "writes". (2) be flexible. I.e. be adaptive enough to take - in data variations. Since we are an early-stage start-up, not everything is set in stone. (3) Fast & easy to work with (4) Cloud Native. We did not want to spend our time in "ANY" infrastructure management.

Based on the above, we picked PostgreSQL and MongoDB for evaluation. We tried a few iterations on hardening the data model with PostgreSQL, but realised that we can move much faster by loosely defining the schema (with just a few fundamental principles intact).

Thus we switched to MongoDB. Before diving in, we validated a few core principles such as: (1) Transaction guarantee. Until 3.6, MongoDB supports Transaction guarantee at Document level. From 4.0 onwards, you can achieve transaction guarantee across multiple documents.

(2) Primary Keys & Indexing: Like any RDBMS, MongoDB supports unique keys & indexes to ensure data integrity & search ability

(3) Ability to join data across data sets: MongoDB offers a super-rich aggregate framework that enables one to filter and group data

(4) Concurrency handling: MongoDB offers specific operations (such as findOneAndUpdate), which when coupled with Optimistic Locking, can be used to achieve concurrency.

Above all, MongoDB offers a complete no-frills Cloud Database as a service - MongoDB Atlas. This kind of sealed the deal for us.

Looking back, choosing MongoDB with MongoDB Atlas was one of the best decisions we took and it is serving us well. My only gripe is that there must be a way to scale-up or scale-down the Atlas configuration at different parts of the day with minimal downtime.

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