Alternatives to React on Rails logo

Alternatives to React on Rails

React, Webpack, React Native, Node.js, and ASP.NET are the most popular alternatives and competitors to React on Rails.
6
5
+ 1
0

What is React on Rails and what are its top alternatives?

Project Objective: To provide an opinionated and optimal framework for integrating Ruby on Rails with React via the Webpacker gem. React on Rails integrates Facebook's React front-end framework with Rails. React v0.14.x and greater is supported, with server rendering. Redux and React-Router are supported as well, also with server rendering, using execJS.
React on Rails is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
React on Rails is an open source tool with 4.4K GitHub stars and 543 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to React on Rails's open source repository on GitHub

React on Rails alternatives & related posts

React logo

React

27K
18.9K
3.4K
27K
18.9K
+ 1
3.4K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
React logo
React
VS
React on Rails logo
React on Rails

related React posts

Dmitry Mukhin
Dmitry Mukhin
at Uploadcare · | 22 upvotes · 148K views
atUploadcareUploadcare
PostCSS
PostCSS
Preact
Preact
Ember.js
Ember.js
React
React
Python
Python
Django
Django

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

See more
Kir Shatrov
Kir Shatrov
Production Engineer at Shopify · | 18 upvotes · 119.4K views
atShopifyShopify
Prototype
Prototype
TypeScript
TypeScript
React
React
JavaScript
JavaScript
jQuery
jQuery
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

The client-side stack of Shopify Admin has been a long journey. It started with HTML templates, jQuery and Prototype. We moved to Batman.js, our in-house Single-Page-Application framework (SPA), in 2013. Then, we re-evaluated our approach and moved back to statically rendered HTML and vanilla JavaScript. As the front-end ecosystem matured, we felt that it was time to rethink our approach again. Last year, we started working on moving Shopify Admin to React and TypeScript.

Many things have changed since the days of jQuery and Batman. JavaScript execution is much faster. We can easily render our apps on the server to do less work on the client, and the resources and tooling for developers are substantially better with React than we ever had with Batman.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more

related Webpack posts

Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 17 upvotes · 64.3K views
ESLint
ESLint
Prettier
Prettier
Babel
Babel
npm
npm
Yarn
Yarn
Node.js
Node.js
Webpack
Webpack
#ES5
#ES6

So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

See more
Jonathan Pugh
Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 16 upvotes · 115K views
Pouchdb
Pouchdb
CouchDB
CouchDB
Font Awesome
Font Awesome
CSS 3
CSS 3
Apache Cordova
Apache Cordova
PhoneGap
PhoneGap
HTML5
HTML5
Ruby
Ruby
Babel
Babel
Webpack
Webpack
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Figma
Figma
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
Framework7
Framework7
#Css
#CSS3
#SCSS
#Sass
#Less
#Electron
#HandleBars
#Template7
#Sketch
#GraphQL
#HTML5
#GraphCool

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

See more

related React Native posts

Vishal Narkhede
Vishal Narkhede
Javascript Developer at getStream.io · | 19 upvotes · 60.2K views
atStreamStream
Babel
Babel
styled-components
styled-components
Expo
Expo
JavaScript
JavaScript
Chat by Stream
Chat by Stream
React Native
React Native
Stream
Stream

Recently, the team at Stream published a React Native SDK for our new Chat by Stream product. React Native brings the power of JavaScript to the world of mobile development, making it easy to develop apps for multiple platforms. We decided to publish two different endpoints for the SDK – Expo and React Native (non-expo), to avoid the hurdle and setup of using the Expo library in React Native only projects on the consumer side.

The capability of style customization is one a large deal breaker for frontend SDKs. To solve this, we decided to use styled-components in our SDK, which makes it easy to add support for themes on top of our existing components. This practice reduces the maintenance effort for stylings of custom components and keeps the overall codebase clean.

For module bundling, we decided to go with Rollup.js instead of Webpack due to its simplicity and performance in the area of library/module providers. We are using Babel for transpiling code, enabling our team to use JavaScript's next-generation features. Additionally, we are using the React Styleguidist component documentation, which makes documenting the React Native code a breeze.

See more
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 275K views
SonarQube
SonarQube
Codacy
Codacy
Docker
Docker
Git
Git
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Solr
Solr
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Heroku
Heroku
Hibernate
Hibernate
MySQL
MySQL
Node.js
Node.js
Java
Java
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery
jQuery
JavaScript
JavaScript
React Native
React Native
React Router
React Router
React
React

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

See more
Node.js logo

Node.js

28.8K
22.8K
7.9K
28.8K
22.8K
+ 1
7.9K
A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
Node.js logo
Node.js
VS
React on Rails logo
React on Rails

related Node.js posts

Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 33 upvotes · 152.5K views
atStreamStream
Go
Go
Stream
Stream
Python
Python
Yarn
Yarn
Babel
Babel
Node.js
Node.js
ES6
ES6
JavaScript
JavaScript
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times · | 27 upvotes · 244.1K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server
Kafka
Kafka
Node.js
Node.js
GraphQL
GraphQL
Apollo
Apollo
React
React
PHP
PHP
MySQL
MySQL

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

See more
ASP.NET logo

ASP.NET

12.9K
270
0
12.9K
270
+ 1
0
An open source web framework for building modern web apps and services with .NET
    Be the first to leave a pro
    ASP.NET logo
    ASP.NET
    VS
    React on Rails logo
    React on Rails

    related ASP.NET posts

    Greg Neumann
    Greg Neumann
    Indie, Solo, Developer · | 6 upvotes · 28.8K views
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Electron
    Electron
    Quasar Framework
    Quasar Framework
    ASP.NET
    ASP.NET
    Xamarin Forms
    Xamarin Forms
    .NET Core
    .NET Core
    Xamarin
    Xamarin

    Finding the most effective dev stack for a solo developer. Over the past year, I've been looking at many tech stacks that would be 'best' for me, as a solo, indie, developer to deliver a desktop app (Windows & Mac) plus mobile - iOS mainly. Initially, Xamarin started to stand-out. Using .NET Core as the run-time, Xamarin as the native API provider and Xamarin Forms for the UI seemed to solve all issues. But, the cracks soon started to appear. Xamarin Forms is mobile only; the Windows incarnation is different. There is no Mac UI solution (you have to code it natively in Mac OS Storyboard. I was also worried how Xamarin Forms , if I was to use it, was going to cope, in future, with Apple's new SwiftUI and Google's new Fuchsia.

    This plethora of techs for the UI-layer made me reach for the safer waters of using Web-techs for the UI. Lovely! Consistency everywhere (well, mostly). But that consistency evaporates when platform issues are addressed. There are so many web frameworks!

    But, I made a simple decision. It's just me...I am clever, but there is no army of coders here. And I have big plans for a business app. How could just 1 developer go-on to deploy a decent app to Windows, iPhone, iPad & Mac OS? I remembered earlier days when I've used Microsoft's ASP.NET to scaffold - generate - loads of Code for a web-app that I needed for several charities that I worked with. What 'generators' exist that do a lot of the platform-specific rubbish, allow the necessary customisation of such platform integration and provide a decent UI?

    I've placed my colours to the Quasar Framework mast. Oh dear, that means Electron desktop apps doesn't it? Well, Ive had enough of loads of Developers saying that "the menus won't look native" or "it uses too much RAM" and so on. I've been using non-native UI-wrapped apps for ages - the date picker in Outlook on iOS is way better than the native date-picker and I'd been using it for years without getting hot under the collar about it. Developers do get so hung-up on things that busy Users hardly notice; don't you think?. As to the RAM usage issue; that's a bit true. But Users only really notice when an app uses so much RAM that the machine starts to page-out. Electron contributes towards that horizon but does not cause it. My Users will be business-users after all. Somewhat decent machines.

    Looking forward to all that lovely Vue.js around my TypeScript and all those really, really, b e a u t I f u l UI controls of Quasar Framework . Still not sure that 1 dev can deliver all that... but I'm up for trying...

    See more
    ASP.NET
    ASP.NET
    Puppeteer
    Puppeteer
    vuex
    vuex
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    React
    React
    Angular 2
    Angular 2
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Netlify
    Netlify
    Heroku
    Heroku
    #Seo
    #Heroku

    I found Heroku to be a great option to get ExpressJS up and running with very little hustle. The free tier is great, but I'd recommend to set up a cronjob to visit your site every few minutes so that the server stays awake. Netlify was the option to host the front-end because doing the server side rendering on #Heroku would have taken a little more time than I'd like to. For the moment pre-rendering the app with prerender-spa-plugin is enough to help with #seo. Puppeteer was my choice over other options because it made it easier to scrape websites made on ASP.NET which is what I needed in this case. And Vue.js is my top choice at the moment because it's really beginner friendly and it has a lot of the features I like about Angular 2 and React. vuex is a must in most of the app I build.

    See more

    related Rails posts

    Zach Holman
    Zach Holman
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Rails
    Rails
    Apollo
    Apollo
    React
    React

    Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

    But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

    But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

    Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

    See more
    Julien DeFrance
    Julien DeFrance
    Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail · | 16 upvotes · 248.2K views
    atSmartZipSmartZip
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Amazon DynamoDB
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Node.js
    Node.js
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    New Relic
    New Relic
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    Amazon Elasticsearch Service
    Elasticsearch
    Elasticsearch
    Superset
    Superset
    Amazon Quicksight
    Amazon Quicksight
    Amazon Redshift
    Amazon Redshift
    Zapier
    Zapier
    Segment
    Segment
    Amazon CloudFront
    Amazon CloudFront
    Memcached
    Memcached
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Amazon ElastiCache
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    Amazon RDS for Aurora
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon S3
    Amazon S3
    Docker
    Docker
    Capistrano
    Capistrano
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    AWS Elastic Beanstalk
    Rails API
    Rails API
    Rails
    Rails
    Algolia
    Algolia

    Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

    I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

    For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

    Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

    Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

    Future improvements / technology decisions included:

    Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

    As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

    One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

    See more
    Django logo

    Django

    7.5K
    5.3K
    2.8K
    7.5K
    5.3K
    + 1
    2.8K
    The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
    Django logo
    Django
    VS
    React on Rails logo
    React on Rails

    related Django posts

    Dmitry Mukhin
    Dmitry Mukhin
    at Uploadcare · | 22 upvotes · 148K views
    atUploadcareUploadcare
    PostCSS
    PostCSS
    Preact
    Preact
    Ember.js
    Ember.js
    React
    React
    Python
    Python
    Django
    Django

    Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

    Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

    For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

    However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

    All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

    See more
    Python
    Python
    Django
    Django
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Node.js
    Node.js

    Django or NodeJS? Hi, I’m thinking about which software I should use for my web-app. What about Node.js or Django for the back-end? I want to create an online preparation course for the final school exams in my country. At the beginning for maths. The course should contain tutorials and a lot of exercises of different types. E.g. multiple choice, user text/number input and drawing tasks. The exercises should change (different levels) with the learning progress. Wrong questions should asked again with different numbers. I also want a score system and statistics. So far, I have got only limited web development skills. (some HTML, CSS, Bootstrap and Wordpress). I don’t know JavaScript or Python.

    Possible pros for Python / Django: - easy syntax, easier to learn for me as a beginner - fast development, earlier release - libraries for mathematical and scientific computation

    Possible pros for JavaScript / Node.js: - great performance, better choice for real time applications: user should get the answer for a question quickly

    Which software would you use in my case? Are my arguments for Python/NodeJS right? Which kind of database would you use?

    Thank you for your answer!

    Node.js JavaScript Django Python

    See more

    related Laravel posts

    Epistol
    Epistol
    PHP
    PHP
    Bulma
    Bulma
    Asana
    Asana
    Stripe
    Stripe
    Let's Encrypt
    Let's Encrypt
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare
    Deployer
    Deployer
    Git
    Git
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    nginx
    nginx
    Buddy
    Buddy
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Sass
    Sass
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics
    PhpStorm
    PhpStorm
    Laravel
    Laravel
    #CDG
    CDG

    I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

    Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

    As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

    To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

    CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

    Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

    See more
    Antonio Sanchez
    Antonio Sanchez
    CEO at Kokoen GmbH · | 10 upvotes · 67.9K views
    atKokoen GmbHKokoen GmbH
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    Node.js
    Node.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Go
    Go
    MySQL
    MySQL
    Laravel
    Laravel
    PHP
    PHP

    Back at the start of 2017, we decided to create a web-based tool for the SEO OnPage analysis of our clients' websites. We had over 2.000 websites to analyze, so we had to perform thousands of requests to get every single page from those websites, process the information and save the big amounts of data somewhere.

    Very soon we realized that the initial chosen script language and database, PHP, Laravel and MySQL, was not going to be able to cope efficiently with such a task.

    By that time, we were doing some experiments for other projects with a language we had recently get to know, Go , so we decided to get a try and code the crawler using it. It was fantastic, we could process much more data with way less CPU power and in less time. By using the concurrency abilites that the language has to offers, we could also do more Http requests in less time.

    Unfortunately, I have no comparison numbers to show about the performance differences between Go and PHP since the difference was so clear from the beginning and that we didn't feel the need to do further comparison tests nor document it. We just switched fully to Go.

    There was still a problem: despite the big amount of Data we were generating, MySQL was performing very well, but as we were adding more and more features to the software and with those features more and more different type of data to save, it was a nightmare for the database architects to structure everything correctly on the database, so it was clear what we had to do next: switch to a NoSQL database. So we switched to MongoDB, and it was also fantastic: we were expending almost zero time in thinking how to structure the Database and the performance also seemed to be better, but again, I have no comparison numbers to show due to the lack of time.

    We also decided to switch the website from PHP and Laravel to JavaScript and Node.js and ExpressJS since working with the JSON Data that we were saving now in the Database would be easier.

    As of now, we don't only use the tool intern but we also opened it for everyone to use for free: https://tool-seo.com

    See more
    Android SDK logo

    Android SDK

    6.9K
    4.9K
    774
    6.9K
    4.9K
    + 1
    774
    An SDK that provides you the API libraries and developer tools necessary to build, test, and debug apps...
    Android SDK logo
    Android SDK
    VS
    React on Rails logo
    React on Rails

    related Android SDK posts

    Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
    Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
    Telecomm Engineering at Netbeast · | 10 upvotes · 90K views
    atNetbeastNetbeast
    Mailjet
    Mailjet
    Intercom
    Intercom
    Amplitude
    Amplitude
    Firebase
    Firebase
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Bitrise
    Bitrise
    Travis CI
    Travis CI
    Objective-C
    Objective-C
    Android SDK
    Android SDK
    React Native
    React Native
    #End2end
    #SmartHome

    We are using React Native in #SmartHome to share the business logic between Android and iOS team and approach users with a unique brand experience. The drawback is that we require lots of native Android SDK and Objective-C modules, so a good part of the invested time is there. The gain for a app that relies less on native communication, sensors and OS tools should be even higher.

    Also it helps us set different testing stages: we use Travis CI for the javascript (business logic), Bitrise to run build tests and @Detox for #end2end automated user tests.

    We use a microservices structure on top of Zeit's @now that read from firebase. We use JWT auth to authenticate requests among services and from users, following GitHub philosophy of using the same infrastructure than its API consumers. Firebase is used mainly as a key-value store between services and as a backup database for users. We also use its authentication mechanisms.

    You can be super locked-in if you also rely on it's analytics, but we use Amplitude for that, which offers us great insights. Intercom for communications with end-user and Mailjet for marketing.

    See more
    Sezgi Uluçam
    Sezgi Uluçam
    Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare · | 6 upvotes · 44.2K views
    Android SDK
    Android SDK
    Android Studio
    Android Studio
    React Native
    React Native
    Xcode
    Xcode
    Expo
    Expo

    I've recently switched to using Expo for initializing and developing my React Native apps. Compared to React Native CLI, it's so much easier to get set up and going. Setting up and maintaining Android Studio, Android SDK, and virtual devices used to be such a headache. Thanks to Expo, I can now test my apps directly on my Android phone, just by installing the Expo app. I still use Xcode Simulator for iOS testing, since I don't have an iPhone, but that's easy anyway. The big win for me with Expo is ease of Android testing.

    The Expo SDK also provides convenient features like Facebook login, MapView, push notifications, and many others. https://docs.expo.io/versions/v31.0.0/sdk/

    See more
    Spring Boot logo

    Spring Boot

    4.1K
    3.3K
    481
    4.1K
    3.3K
    + 1
    481
    Create Spring-powered, production-grade applications and services with absolute minimum fuss