Alternatives to HTML5 logo

Alternatives to HTML5

Android SDK, JavaScript, WordPress, Java, and AngularJS are the most popular alternatives and competitors to HTML5.
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What is HTML5 and what are its top alternatives?

HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.
HTML5 is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives of HTML5

HTML5 alternatives & related posts

Android SDK logo

Android SDK

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An SDK that provides you the API libraries and developer tools necessary to build, test, and debug apps...
Android SDK logo
Android SDK
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HTML5 logo
HTML5

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Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
Telecomm Engineering at Netbeast · | 10 upvotes · 615.7K views
atNetbeastNetbeast
React Native
React Native
Android SDK
Android SDK
Objective-C
Objective-C
Travis CI
Travis CI
Bitrise
Bitrise
GitHub
GitHub
Firebase
Firebase
Amplitude
Amplitude
Intercom
Intercom
Mailjet
Mailjet
#SmartHome
#End2end

We are using React Native in #SmartHome to share the business logic between Android and iOS team and approach users with a unique brand experience. The drawback is that we require lots of native Android SDK and Objective-C modules, so a good part of the invested time is there. The gain for a app that relies less on native communication, sensors and OS tools should be even higher.

Also it helps us set different testing stages: we use Travis CI for the javascript (business logic), Bitrise to run build tests and @Detox for #end2end automated user tests.

We use a microservices structure on top of Zeit's @now that read from firebase. We use JWT auth to authenticate requests among services and from users, following GitHub philosophy of using the same infrastructure than its API consumers. Firebase is used mainly as a key-value store between services and as a backup database for users. We also use its authentication mechanisms.

You can be super locked-in if you also rely on it's analytics, but we use Amplitude for that, which offers us great insights. Intercom for communications with end-user and Mailjet for marketing.

See more
Sezgi Ulucam
Sezgi Ulucam
Developer Advocate at Hasura · | 7 upvotes · 366.4K views
Expo
Expo
Xcode
Xcode
React Native
React Native
Android Studio
Android Studio
Android SDK
Android SDK

I've recently switched to using Expo for initializing and developing my React Native apps. Compared to React Native CLI, it's so much easier to get set up and going. Setting up and maintaining Android Studio, Android SDK, and virtual devices used to be such a headache. Thanks to Expo, I can now test my apps directly on my Android phone, just by installing the Expo app. I still use Xcode Simulator for iOS testing, since I don't have an iPhone, but that's easy anyway. The big win for me with Expo is ease of Android testing.

The Expo SDK also provides convenient features like Facebook login, MapView, push notifications, and many others. https://docs.expo.io/versions/v31.0.0/sdk/

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related JavaScript posts

Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 724.9K views
atStreamStream
Stream
Stream
Go
Go
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
Node.js
Node.js
Babel
Babel
Yarn
Yarn
Python
Python
#FrameworksFullStack
#Languages

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer · | 30 upvotes · 867.1K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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related WordPress posts

Dale Ross
Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 21 upvotes · 494.6K views
Blogger
Blogger
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
WordPress
WordPress
Jekyll
Jekyll
GitHub Pages
GitHub Pages
Ruby
Ruby
Disqus
Disqus

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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Siddhant Sharma
Siddhant Sharma
Tech Connoisseur at Bigstep Technologies · | 12 upvotes · 464.5K views
WordPress
WordPress
Magento
Magento
PHP
PHP
Java
Java
Swift
Swift
JavaScript
JavaScript
#Messaging
#Communication
#InAppChat
#Dating
#Matrimonial

WordPress Magento PHP Java Swift JavaScript

Back in the days, we started looking for a date on different matrimonial websites as there were no Dating Applications. We used to create different profiles. It all changed in 2012 when Tinder, an Online Dating application came into India Market.

Tinder allowed us to communicate with our potential soul mates. That too without paying any extra money. I too got 4-6 matches in 6 years. It changed the life of many Millennials. Tinder created a revolution of its own. P.S. - I still don't have a date :(

Posting my first article. Please have a look and do give feedback.

Communication InAppChat Dating Matrimonial #messaging

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Java logo

Java

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A concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, language specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible
Java logo
Java
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HTML5

related Java posts

Kamil Kowalski
Kamil Kowalski
Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 26 upvotes · 215.1K views
atFresha EngineeringFresha Engineering
Selenium
Selenium
Java
Java
Ruby
Ruby
Elixir
Elixir
JavaScript
JavaScript
Cypress
Cypress

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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C#
C#
Java
Java
Visual Studio
Visual Studio

I use C# because of the ease of designing user interfaces compared to Java. Using Visual Studio makes C# a breeze for prototyping and creating apps and I really appreciate how quickly I can turn an idea into reality. I was first introduced to C# in a special topics course and quickly started preferring it over Java. The similarities between the two made the switch easy while the added benefits C# offers made it very worth it.

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AngularJS logo

AngularJS

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Superheroic JavaScript MVW Framework
AngularJS logo
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Jake Stein
Jake Stein
CEO at Stitch · | 15 upvotes · 192.6K views
atStitchStitch
AngularJS
AngularJS
React
React
CoffeeScript
CoffeeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6

Stitch’s frontend is used to configure data sources and destinations and monitor the status of each. Although we have been using AngularJS since its early days, we recently introduced React components into our front end, which many of our developers find easier to work with. We started using CoffeeScript when it was one of the few options for a more expressive alternative to vanilla JavaScript, but today we opt to instead write new code in ES6, which we feel is a more mature alternative.

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Arik Fraimovich
Arik Fraimovich
AngularJS
AngularJS
Angular 2
Angular 2
React
React
Vue.js
Vue.js

When Redash was created 5 years ago we chose AngularJS as our frontend framework, but as AngularJS was replaced by Angular 2 we had to make a new choice. We decided that we won't migrate to Angular, but to either React or Vue.js. Eventually we decided to migrate to React for the following reasons:

  1. Many in our community are already using React internally and will be able to contribute.
  2. Using react2angular we can do the migration gradually over time instead of having to invest in a big rewrite while halting feature development.

So far the gradual strategy pays off and in the last 3 major releases we already shipped React code in the Angular.js application.

See more
PHP logo

PHP

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A popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development
PHP logo
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Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times · | 30 upvotes · 925.3K views
atThe New York TimesThe New York Times
MySQL
MySQL
PHP
PHP
React
React
Apollo
Apollo
GraphQL
GraphQL
Node.js
Node.js
Kafka
Kafka
Apache HTTP Server
Apache HTTP Server

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 498.7K views
npm
npm
Vue.js
Vue.js
vuex
vuex
JavaScript
JavaScript
Pug
Pug
Sass
Sass
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
ES6
ES6
Asana
Asana
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
PHP
PHP
Babel
Babel

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

See more
Python logo

Python

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A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java.
Python logo
Python
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HTML5

related Python posts

Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 724.9K views
atStreamStream
Stream
Stream
Go
Go
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
Node.js
Node.js
Babel
Babel
Yarn
Yarn
Python
Python
#FrameworksFullStack
#Languages

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
Conor Myhrvold
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 25 upvotes · 2M views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
Jaeger
Jaeger
Python
Python
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
Go
Go
C++
C++
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
JavaScript
JavaScript
Red Hat OpenShift
Red Hat OpenShift
C#
C#
Apache Spark
Apache Spark

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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ES6 logo

ES6

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The next version of JavaScript
ES6 logo
ES6
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HTML5 logo
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related ES6 posts

Nick Parsons
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 34 upvotes · 724.9K views
atStreamStream
Stream
Stream
Go
Go
JavaScript
JavaScript
ES6
ES6
Node.js
Node.js
Babel
Babel
Yarn
Yarn
Python
Python
#FrameworksFullStack
#Languages

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 18 upvotes · 498.7K views
npm
npm
Vue.js
Vue.js
vuex
vuex
JavaScript
JavaScript
Pug
Pug
Sass
Sass
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
ES6
ES6
Asana
Asana
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
PHP
PHP
Babel
Babel

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

See more