Alternatives to Node.js logo

Alternatives to Node.js

AngularJS, PHP, Python, JavaScript, and React are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Node.js.
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What is Node.js and what are its top alternatives?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.
Node.js is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
Node.js is an open source tool with 77.2K GitHub stars and 19.4K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Node.js's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Node.js

  • AngularJS

    AngularJS

    AngularJS lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser. It lets you use good old HTML (or HAML, Jade and friends!) as your template language and lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your application’s components clearly and succinctly. It automatically synchronizes data from your UI (view) with your JavaScript objects (model) through 2-way data binding. ...

  • PHP

    PHP

    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world. ...

  • Python

    Python

    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best. ...

  • JavaScript

    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

  • React

    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • Django

    Django

    Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. ...

  • ASP.NET

    ASP.NET

    .NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications. ...

  • Java

    Java

    Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere! ...

Node.js alternatives & related posts

AngularJS logo

AngularJS

39.1K
27K
5.2K
Superheroic JavaScript MVW Framework
39.1K
27K
+ 1
5.2K
PROS OF ANGULARJS
  • 885
    Quick to develop
  • 589
    Great mvc
  • 571
    Powerful
  • 522
    Restful
  • 504
    Backed by google
  • 350
    Two-way data binding
  • 344
    Javascript
  • 329
    Open source
  • 306
    Dependency injection
  • 197
    Readable
  • 75
    Fast
  • 64
    Directives
  • 63
    Great community
  • 55
    Free
  • 38
    Extend html vocabulary
  • 29
    Components
  • 25
    Easy to test
  • 24
    Easy to learn
  • 23
    Easy to templates
  • 23
    Great documentation
  • 21
    Easy to start
  • 17
    Awesome
  • 17
    Light weight
  • 14
    Angular 2.0
  • 14
    Javascript mvw framework
  • 13
    Great extensions
  • 13
    Efficient
  • 10
    Easy to prototype with
  • 8
    High performance
  • 8
    Lots of community modules
  • 8
    Coffeescript
  • 7
    Two-way binding
  • 7
    Mvc
  • 6
    Easy to e2e
  • 6
    Clean and keeps code readable
  • 5
    One of the best frameworks
  • 5
    Easy for small applications
  • 4
    Works great with jquery
  • 4
    Fast development
  • 2
    Hierarchical Data Structure
  • 2
    The two-way Data Binding is awesome
  • 2
    Community
  • 2
    Typescript
  • 2
    Declarative programming
  • 2
    I do not touch DOM
  • 2
    Be a developer, not a plumber.
  • 2
    Dart
  • 1
    Fkin awesome
  • 1
    Scopes
  • 1
    The powerful of binding, routing and controlling routes
  • 1
    Supports api , easy development
  • 1
    Opinionated in the right areas
  • 1
    Amazing community support
  • 1
    Common Place
  • 1
    Very very useful and fast framework for development.
  • 1
    Great
  • 1
    Programming fun again
  • 1
    Readable code
  • 1
    Linear learning curve
CONS OF ANGULARJS
  • 10
    Complex
  • 3
    Dependency injection
  • 2
    Learning Curve
  • 2
    Event Listener Overload
  • 1
    Hard to learn

related AngularJS posts

Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 23 upvotes · 1.5M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 19 upvotes · 478.8K views

Our whole Vue.js frontend stack (incl. SSR) consists of the following tools:

  • Nuxt.js consisting of Vue CLI, Vue Router, vuex, Webpack and Sass (Bundler for HTML5, CSS 3), Babel (Transpiler for JavaScript),
  • Vue Styleguidist as our style guide and pool of developed Vue.js components
  • Vuetify as Material Component Framework (for fast app development)
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • Apollo / GraphQL (incl. GraphiQL) for data access layer (https://apollo.vuejs.org/)
  • ESLint, TSLint and Prettier for coding style and code analyzes
  • Jest as testing framework
  • Google Fonts and Font Awesome for typography and icon toolkit
  • NativeScript-Vue for mobile development

The main reason we have chosen Vue.js over React and AngularJS is related to the following artifacts:

  • Empowered HTML. Vue.js has many similar approaches with Angular. This helps to optimize HTML blocks handling with the use of different components.
  • Detailed documentation. Vue.js has very good documentation which can fasten learning curve for developers.
  • Adaptability. It provides a rapid switching period from other frameworks. It has similarities with Angular and React in terms of design and architecture.
  • Awesome integration. Vue.js can be used for both building single-page applications and more difficult web interfaces of apps. Smaller interactive parts can be easily integrated into the existing infrastructure with no negative effect on the entire system.
  • Large scaling. Vue.js can help to develop pretty large reusable templates.
  • Tiny size. Vue.js weights around 20KB keeping its speed and flexibility. It allows reaching much better performance in comparison to other frameworks.
See more
PHP logo

PHP

98.2K
43.5K
4.5K
A popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development
98.2K
43.5K
+ 1
4.5K
PROS OF PHP
  • 938
    Large community
  • 800
    Open source
  • 754
    Easy deployment
  • 480
    Great frameworks
  • 384
    The best glue on the web
  • 230
    Continual improvements
  • 180
    Good old web
  • 141
    Web foundation
  • 130
    Community packages
  • 123
    Tool support
  • 31
    Used by wordpress
  • 30
    Excellent documentation
  • 25
    Used by Facebook
  • 23
    Because of Symfony
  • 16
    Dynamic Language
  • 14
    Awesome Language and easy to implement
  • 12
    Fast development
  • 11
    Cheap hosting
  • 11
    Very powerful web language
  • 9
    Flexibility, syntax, extensibility
  • 9
    Composer
  • 9
    Because of Laravel
  • 7
    Easy to learn
  • 7
    Short development lead times
  • 7
    Worst popularity quality ratio
  • 7
    Fastestest Time to Version 1.0 Deployments
  • 7
    Readable Code
  • 6
    Easiest deployment
  • 6
    Fast
  • 6
    Faster then ever
  • 5
    Most of the web uses it
  • 4
    Open source and large community
  • 4
    I have no choice :(
  • 3
    Easy to learn, a big community, lot of frameworks
  • 3
    Is like one zip of air
  • 3
    Has the best ecommerce(Magento,Prestashop,Opencart,etc)
  • 3
    Cheap to own
  • 3
    Simple, flexible yet Scalable
  • 3
    Easy to use and learn
  • 2
    Hard not to use
  • 2
    Large community, easy setup, easy deployment, framework
  • 2
    Safe the planet
  • 2
    Walk away
  • 2
    Great flexibility. From fast prototyping to large apps
  • 2
    Used by STOMT
  • 2
    Great developer experience
  • 2
    Open source and great framework
  • 2
    Fault tolerance
  • 2
    FFI
  • 2
    Interpreted at the run time
CONS OF PHP
  • 19
    So easy to learn, good practices are hard to find
  • 16
    Inconsistent API
  • 8
    Fragmented community
  • 5
    Not secure
  • 2
    No routing system
  • 1
    Hard to debug
  • 1
    Old

related PHP posts

Nick Rockwell
SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 42 upvotes · 1.4M views

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

See more
Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 23 upvotes · 1.5M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
See more
Python logo

Python

116.3K
90.5K
6.4K
A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java.
116.3K
90.5K
+ 1
6.4K
PROS OF PYTHON
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 921
    Readable code
  • 815
    Beautiful code
  • 764
    Rapid development
  • 669
    Large community
  • 414
    Open source
  • 375
    Elegant
  • 264
    Great community
  • 257
    Object oriented
  • 206
    Dynamic typing
  • 68
    Great standard library
  • 51
    Very fast
  • 47
    Functional programming
  • 33
    Scientific computing
  • 31
    Easy to learn
  • 29
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Matlab alternative
  • 22
    Productivity
  • 21
    Easy to read
  • 19
    Simple is better than complex
  • 17
    It's the way I think
  • 17
    Imperative
  • 15
    Very programmer and non-programmer friendly
  • 14
    Powerful
  • 14
    Free
  • 13
    Fast and simple
  • 13
    Powerfull language
  • 12
    Scripting
  • 9
    Explicit is better than implicit
  • 9
    Machine learning support
  • 8
    Unlimited power
  • 8
    Ease of development
  • 7
    Import antigravity
  • 7
    Clear and easy and powerfull
  • 6
    It's lean and fun to code
  • 6
    Print "life is short, use python"
  • 5
    Great for tooling
  • 5
    Fast coding and good for competitions
  • 5
    There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious
  • 5
    Python has great libraries for data processing
  • 5
    High Documented language
  • 5
    I love snakes
  • 5
    Although practicality beats purity
  • 5
    Flat is better than nested
  • 4
    Readability counts
  • 3
    Multiple Inheritence
  • 3
    Complex is better than complicated
  • 3
    Lists, tuples, dictionaries
  • 3
    Rapid Prototyping
  • 3
    Plotting
  • 3
    Socially engaged community
  • 3
    Great for analytics
  • 3
    Beautiful is better than ugly
  • 3
    CG industry needs
  • 2
    No cruft
  • 2
    Easy to learn and use
  • 2
    List comprehensions
  • 2
    Generators
  • 2
    Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules
  • 2
    Now is better than never
  • 2
    If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad id
  • 2
    If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a g
  • 2
    Simple and easy to learn
  • 2
    Import this
  • 1
    It is Very easy , simple and will you be love programmi
  • 1
    Because of Netflix
  • 1
    Web scraping
  • 1
    Better outcome
  • 1
    Batteries included
  • 1
    Powerful language for AI
  • 1
    Easy to setup and run smooth
  • 1
    Pip install everything
  • 1
    Only one way to do it
  • 1
    A-to-Z
  • 1
    Many types of collections
  • 1
    Flexible and easy
  • 0
    Pro
  • 0
    Powerful
CONS OF PYTHON
  • 48
    Still divided between python 2 and python 3
  • 26
    Performance impact
  • 26
    Poor syntax for anonymous functions
  • 18
    Package management is a mess
  • 18
    GIL
  • 13
    Too imperative-oriented
  • 12
    Hard to understand
  • 10
    Dynamic typing
  • 8
    Very slow
  • 8
    Not everything is expression
  • 7
    Indentations matter a lot
  • 7
    Explicit self parameter in methods
  • 6
    Poor DSL capabilities
  • 6
    No anonymous functions
  • 6
    Requires C functions for dynamic modules
  • 5
    The "lisp style" whitespaces
  • 5
    Hard to obfuscate
  • 4
    The benevolent-dictator-for-life quit
  • 4
    Lack of Syntax Sugar leads to "the pyramid of doom"
  • 4
    Threading
  • 4
    Fake object-oriented programming
  • 4
    Incredibly slow
  • 3
    Not suitable for autocomplete
  • 3
    Official documentation is unclear.
  • 2
    Circular import
  • 1
    Training wheels (forced indentation)
  • 1
    Meta classes

related Python posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 37 upvotes · 3.4M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

See more
Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 1.2M views

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

See more
JavaScript logo

JavaScript

173K
128.6K
7.5K
Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
173K
128.6K
+ 1
7.5K
PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 1.6K
    Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 1.5K
    It's everywhere
  • 1.1K
    Lots of great frameworks
  • 881
    Fast
  • 730
    Light weight
  • 408
    Flexible
  • 374
    You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
  • 278
    Non-blocking i/o
  • 227
    Ubiquitousness
  • 182
    Expressive
  • 44
    Extended functionality to web pages
  • 40
    Relatively easy language
  • 37
    Executed on the client side
  • 22
    Relatively fast to the end user
  • 18
    Pure Javascript
  • 13
    Functional programming
  • 6
    Async
  • 4
    Full-stack
  • 4
    Because I love functions
  • 4
    Setup is easy
  • 4
    JavaScript is the New PHP
  • 3
    Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
  • 3
    Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
  • 3
    Its everywhere
  • 3
    Expansive community
  • 3
    Future Language of The Web
  • 2
    Evolution of C
  • 2
    For the good parts
  • 2
    Love-hate relationship
  • 2
    Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
  • 2
    Everyone use it
  • 2
    Easy to hire developers
  • 2
    Supports lambdas and closures
  • 1
    Versitile
  • 1
    Powerful
  • 1
    1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 1
    Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
  • 1
    Agile, packages simple to use
  • 1
    Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
  • 1
    No need to use PHP
  • 1
    It's fun
  • 1
    Its fun and fast
  • 1
    Most Popular Language in the World
  • 1
    Hard not to use
  • 1
    Stockholm Syndrome
  • 1
    Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
  • 1
    Promise relationship
  • 1
    It let's me use Babel & Typescript
  • 1
    Function expressions are useful for callbacks
  • 1
    Scope manipulation
  • 1
    What to add
  • 1
    Clojurescript
  • 1
    Client processing
  • 1
    Everywhere
  • 1
    Only Programming language on browser
  • 1
    Nice
  • 0
    Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
  • 0
    Because it is so simple and lightweight
  • 0
    Easy to make something
  • 0
    Easy
CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 21
    A constant moving target, too much churn
  • 20
    Horribly inconsistent
  • 13
    Javascript is the New PHP
  • 8
    No ability to monitor memory utilitization
  • 5
    Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
  • 4
    Can be ugly
  • 3
    Thinks strange results are better than errors
  • 1
    No GitHub

related JavaScript posts

Zach Holman

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

See more
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 37 upvotes · 3.4M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

See more
React logo

React

88.6K
67.7K
3.7K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
88.6K
67.7K
+ 1
3.7K
PROS OF REACT
  • 737
    Components
  • 645
    Virtual dom
  • 552
    Performance
  • 477
    Simplicity
  • 433
    Composable
  • 171
    Data flow
  • 156
    Declarative
  • 121
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 111
    Reactive updates
  • 109
    Explicit app state
  • 28
    JSX
  • 20
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 17
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 16
    Easy to Use
  • 14
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 9
    Great perfomance
  • 6
    Built by Facebook
  • 4
    Feels like the 90s
  • 4
    Speed
  • 4
    Scalable
  • 3
    Functional
  • 3
    Javascript
  • 3
    Easy to start
  • 3
    Server side views
  • 2
    TypeScript support
  • 2
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 2
    SSR
  • 2
    Fast evolving
  • 2
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 2
    Fancy third party tools
  • 2
    Excellent Documentation
  • 2
    Scales super well
  • 2
    Just the View of MVC
  • 2
    Server Side Rendering
  • 2
    Awesome
  • 2
    Cross-platform
  • 2
    Hooks
  • 2
    Rich ecosystem
  • 1
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 1
    Props
  • 1
    Fragments
  • 1
    Sharable
  • 1
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 1
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Super easy
  • 1
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 1
    Has functional components
  • 1
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 1
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 1
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 1
    Strong Community
  • 1
    Has arrow functions
  • 1
    Allows creating single page applications
  • 1
    Simple
  • 0
    Start simple
CONS OF REACT
  • 31
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 19
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 18
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 6
    JSX
  • 6
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 1
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 1
    One-way binding only

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 1.3M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

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Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 26 upvotes · 280.8K views
Shared insights
on
Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

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Django

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The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
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PROS OF DJANGO
  • 602
    Rapid development
  • 446
    Open source
  • 386
    Great community
  • 337
    Easy to learn
  • 249
    Mvc
  • 202
    Elegant
  • 201
    Beautiful code
  • 180
    Free
  • 179
    Great packages
  • 167
    Great libraries
  • 55
    Restful
  • 52
    Comes with auth and crud admin panel
  • 51
    Powerful
  • 48
    Great documentation
  • 46
    Great for web
  • 36
    Python
  • 31
    Great orm
  • 27
    Great for api
  • 21
    All included
  • 17
    Web Apps
  • 16
    Fast
  • 14
    Used by top startups
  • 12
    Clean
  • 11
    Easy setup
  • 10
    Sexy
  • 8
    Convention over configuration
  • 5
    ORM
  • 5
    Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
  • 5
    The Django community
  • 3
    Mvt
  • 3
    Its elegant and practical
  • 3
    Great MVC and templating engine
  • 2
    Easy to use
  • 2
    Easy to develop end to end AI Models
  • 2
    Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
  • 2
    Cross-Platform
  • 2
    Fast prototyping
  • 2
    Full stack
  • 2
    Batteries included
  • 2
    Easy
  • 1
    Great peformance
  • 1
    Many libraries
  • 1
    Zero code burden to change databases
  • 1
    Have not found anything that it can't do
  • 1
    Map
  • 1
    Scaffold
  • 1
    Modular
  • 1
    Very quick to get something up and running
  • 1
    Just the right level of abstraction
  • 1
    Python community
  • 1
    Full-Text Search
  • 1
    King of backend world
CONS OF DJANGO
  • 24
    Underpowered templating
  • 19
    Underpowered ORM
  • 18
    Autoreload restarts whole server
  • 15
    URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
  • 10
    Internal subcomponents coupling
  • 7
    Not nodejs
  • 5
    Admin
  • 4
    Configuration hell
  • 3
    Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
  • 2
    Bloated admin panel included
  • 2
    Not typed
  • 2
    Python
  • 2
    Overwhelming folder structure
  • 1
    InEffective Multithreading

related Django posts

Dmitry Mukhin

Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

See more

Hey, so I developed a basic application with Python. But to use it, you need a python interpreter. I want to add a GUI to make it more appealing. What should I choose to develop a GUI? I have very basic skills in front end development (CSS, JavaScript). I am fluent in python. I'm looking for a tool that is easy to use and doesn't require too much code knowledge. I have recently tried out Flask, but it is kinda complicated. Should I stick with it, move to Django, or is there another nice framework to use?

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ASP.NET

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An open source web framework for building modern web apps and services with .NET
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PROS OF ASP.NET
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    Great mvc
CONS OF ASP.NET
    Be the first to leave a con

    related ASP.NET posts

    Greg Neumann

    Finding the most effective dev stack for a solo developer. Over the past year, I've been looking at many tech stacks that would be 'best' for me, as a solo, indie, developer to deliver a desktop app (Windows & Mac) plus mobile - iOS mainly. Initially, Xamarin started to stand-out. Using .NET Core as the run-time, Xamarin as the native API provider and Xamarin Forms for the UI seemed to solve all issues. But, the cracks soon started to appear. Xamarin Forms is mobile only; the Windows incarnation is different. There is no Mac UI solution (you have to code it natively in Mac OS Storyboard. I was also worried how Xamarin Forms , if I was to use it, was going to cope, in future, with Apple's new SwiftUI and Google's new Fuchsia.

    This plethora of techs for the UI-layer made me reach for the safer waters of using Web-techs for the UI. Lovely! Consistency everywhere (well, mostly). But that consistency evaporates when platform issues are addressed. There are so many web frameworks!

    But, I made a simple decision. It's just me...I am clever, but there is no army of coders here. And I have big plans for a business app. How could just 1 developer go-on to deploy a decent app to Windows, iPhone, iPad & Mac OS? I remembered earlier days when I've used Microsoft's ASP.NET to scaffold - generate - loads of Code for a web-app that I needed for several charities that I worked with. What 'generators' exist that do a lot of the platform-specific rubbish, allow the necessary customisation of such platform integration and provide a decent UI?

    I've placed my colours to the Quasar Framework mast. Oh dear, that means Electron desktop apps doesn't it? Well, Ive had enough of loads of Developers saying that "the menus won't look native" or "it uses too much RAM" and so on. I've been using non-native UI-wrapped apps for ages - the date picker in Outlook on iOS is way better than the native date-picker and I'd been using it for years without getting hot under the collar about it. Developers do get so hung-up on things that busy Users hardly notice; don't you think?. As to the RAM usage issue; that's a bit true. But Users only really notice when an app uses so much RAM that the machine starts to page-out. Electron contributes towards that horizon but does not cause it. My Users will be business-users after all. Somewhat decent machines.

    Looking forward to all that lovely Vue.js around my TypeScript and all those really, really, b e a u t I f u l UI controls of Quasar Framework . Still not sure that 1 dev can deliver all that... but I'm up for trying...

    See more

    I found Heroku to be a great option to get ExpressJS up and running with very little hustle. The free tier is great, but I'd recommend to set up a cronjob to visit your site every few minutes so that the server stays awake. Netlify was the option to host the front-end because doing the server side rendering on #Heroku would have taken a little more time than I'd like to. For the moment pre-rendering the app with prerender-spa-plugin is enough to help with #seo. Puppeteer was my choice over other options because it made it easier to scrape websites made on ASP.NET which is what I needed in this case. And Vue.js is my top choice at the moment because it's really beginner friendly and it has a lot of the features I like about Angular 2 and React. vuex is a must in most of the app I build.

    See more
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    Java

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    A concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, language specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible
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    PROS OF JAVA
    • 572
      Great libraries
    • 433
      Widely used
    • 395
      Excellent tooling
    • 378
      Huge amount of documentation available
    • 328
      Large pool of developers available
    • 197
      Open source
    • 192
      Excellent performance
    • 150
      Great development
    • 143
      Used for android
    • 142
      Vast array of 3rd party libraries
    • 54
      Compiled Language
    • 46
      Used for Web
    • 42
      Managed memory
    • 42
      Native threads
    • 40
      High Performance
    • 35
      Statically typed
    • 31
      Easy to read
    • 29
      Great Community
    • 25
      Reliable platform
    • 23
      JVM compatibility
    • 22
      Sturdy garbage collection
    • 19
      Cross Platform Enterprise Integration
    • 18
      Universal platform
    • 16
      Great Support
    • 16
      Good amount of APIs
    • 11
      Lots of boilerplate
    • 10
      Great ecosystem
    • 10
      Backward compatible
    • 9
      Everywhere
    • 7
      Excellent SDK - JDK
    • 6
      Mature language thus stable systems
    • 5
      Better than Ruby
    • 5
      Portability
    • 5
      Cross-platform
    • 5
      Static typing
    • 5
      Clojure
    • 5
      It's Java
    • 4
      Old tech
    • 4
      Vast Collections Library
    • 3
      Most developers favorite
    • 3
      Stable platform, which many new languages depend on
    • 3
      Long term language
    • 3
      Great Structure
    • 3
      Best martial for design
    • 3
      Used for Android development
    • 2
      Testable
    • 1
      Javadoc
    CONS OF JAVA
    • 29
      Verbosity
    • 23
      NullpointerException
    • 15
      Overcomplexity is praised in community culture
    • 13
      Nightmare to Write
    • 10
      Boiler plate code
    • 8
      Classpath hell prior to Java 9
    • 6
      No REPL
    • 4
      No property
    • 2
      Code are too long
    • 2
      There is not optional parameter
    • 2
      Floating-point errors
    • 1
      Terrbible compared to Python/Batch Perormence
    • 1
      Java's too statically, stronglly, and strictly typed
    • 1
      Non-intuitive generic implementation
    • 1
      Returning Wildcard Types

    related Java posts

    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 37 upvotes · 3.4M views

    How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

    Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

    Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

    https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

    (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

    Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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    Kamil Kowalski
    Lead Architect at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 807.8K views

    When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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