.NET vs Node.js vs Spring

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.NET
.NET

3.9K
2.1K
+ 1
1.5K
Node.js
Node.js

30.9K
24.7K
+ 1
7.9K
Spring
Spring

1.9K
1.6K
+ 1
942

What is .NET?

.NET is a general purpose development platform. With .NET, you can use multiple languages, editors, and libraries to build native applications for web, mobile, desktop, gaming, and IoT for Windows, macOS, Linux, Android, and more.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

What is Spring?

A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.
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What are some alternatives to .NET, Node.js, and Spring?
ASP.NET
.NET is a developer platform made up of tools, programming languages, and libraries for building many different types of applications.
Rails
Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.
Django
Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.
Laravel
It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.
Android SDK
Android provides a rich application framework that allows you to build innovative apps and games for mobile devices in a Java language environment.
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Decisions about .NET, Node.js, and Spring
John-Daniel Trask
John-Daniel Trask
Co-founder & CEO at Raygun · | 23 upvotes · 103.2K views
atRaygunRaygun
.NET
.NET
Node.js
Node.js
#Languages
#FrameworksFullStack

The core Web application of Raygun is still a Microsoft ASP.NET MVC application. Not too much has changed from a fundamental technology standpoint. We originally built using Mono, which just bled memory and would need to be constantly recycled. So we looked around at the options and what would be well suited to the highly transactional nature of our API. We settled on Node.js, feeling that the event loop model worked well given the lightweight workload of each message being processed. This served us well for several years.

When we started to look at .NET Core in early 2016, it became quite obvious that being able to asynchronously hand off to our queuing service greatly improved throughput. Unfortunately, at the time, Node.js didn’t provide an easy mechanism to do this, while .NET Core had great concurrency capabilities from day one. This meant that our servers spent less time blocking on the hand off, and could start processing the next inbound message. This was the core component of the performance improvement.

We chose .NET because it was a platform that our team was familiar with. Also we were skilled enough with it to know many performance tips and tricks to get the most from it. Due to this experience, it helped us get to market faster and deliver great performance.

#Languages #FrameworksFullStack

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Spenser Coke
Spenser Coke
Product Engineer at Loanlink.de · | 8 upvotes · 153.3K views
atLoanlink GmbhLoanlink Gmbh
Rails
Rails
AngularJS
AngularJS
.NET
.NET
Node.js
Node.js
React
React
GitHub
GitHub
Trello
Trello
Zapier
Zapier
Mailchimp
Mailchimp
Google Drive
Google Drive
Vue.js
Vue.js
HTML5
HTML5

When starting a new company and building a new product w/ limited engineering we chose to optimize for expertise and rapid development, landing on Rails API, w/ AngularJS on the front.

The reality is that we're building a CRUD app, so we considered going w/ vanilla Rails MVC to optimize velocity early on (it may not be sexy, but it gets the job done). Instead, we opted to split the codebase to allow for a richer front-end experience, focus on skill specificity when hiring, and give us the flexibility to be consumed by multiple clients in the future.

We also considered .NET core or Node.js for the API layer, and React on the front-end, but our experiences dealing with mature Node APIs and the rapid-fire changes that comes with state management in React-land put us off, given our level of experience with those tools.

We're using GitHub and Trello to track issues and projects, and a plethora of other tools to help the operational team, like Zapier, MailChimp, Google Drive with some basic Vue.js & HTML5 apps for smaller internal-facing web projects.

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Brandon Stirnaman
Brandon Stirnaman
Architect at Blackbaud · | 4 upvotes · 4.1K views
atBlackbaudBlackbaud
.NET
.NET

I chose .NET Core because it finally let me work natively on my macOS and Linux machines but collaborate with coworkers using Windows. Devs use the devices that they feel most capable with.

Having services that can run without changes on Linux let us migrate to containerized deployments on Kubernetes without much effort. The performance we've gotten from small ASP.NET Core services running on Alpine images has been great.

While the versioning of SDK and libraries/meta packages/etc has been kind of nuts.. We also keep getting new features that are really valuable and easy to package into our services.

Just rolling out v3 of the WebJobs SDK which brought simpler DI, filters and more to our Async backend workers. Also preparing to run v2 of Functions in our Azure Kubernetes cluster with virtual-kubelet.

In the last year, the community has finally started heavily moving towards NETStandard 2.0 which has eliminated some of our last points of frustration -- not finding compatible clients/libraries/tools that we could use from .NET Core apps (and, funny enough our older .NET Framework apps too!).

We're all in on .NET Core now.

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.NET
.NET
Visual Studio
Visual Studio
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Docker
Docker
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

I have been working in .NET for more than 10 years. As an architect, I understand that enterprises want to lower costs. Full .NET framework, although excellent, has lot of costs around it - starting from Visual Studio for development (Enterprises cannot use Community edition) to Windows Server licensing for hosting. .NET Core makes development faster, cheaper and accessible to anyone. It is easier to convince bosses to go with .NET Core than with the full framework. With Visual Studio Code, development teams can install it in minutes compared to the full day they had to submit their laptop to IT team to get full Visual Studio installed. .NET Core is also highly performant and has been my choice for an IoT project that I have been executing with microservices running in a Docker container managed by Kubernetes! Unless I have a specific need, I preach the gospel of .NET Core.

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Jonathan Kight
Jonathan Kight
at Blizzard Entertainment · | 1 upvotes · 6.4K views
.NET
.NET

I use .NET because of its community and Microsoft's commitment to open source. Game backends require many different design strategies, ranging from latency sensitive customer facing services to high-throughput eventually consistent data pipelines. Performance, tooling, and predictability are qualities that make these services successful and .NET helps me get there by having framework features which promote quick prototyping, but are mature enough to harden for production.

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Sparker73
Sparker73
Frontend Developer · | 6 upvotes · 22.5K views
Node.js
Node.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
.NET
.NET
PHP
PHP

Node.js is my choice because it uses very few resources to run and it is capable to handle tons of connections simultaneously. Most developers already know JavaScript, the evolution of ECMAScript is immediately reflected to Node.js and all you have to do is update your Server's Node.js version without time and effort. Thousands of improvements that makes it very powerful especially in asynchronous programming. The web is full of courses, dev communities, free sample code, plunkers and many knowledge sources on Node.js that facilitates the learning curve. What else we can ask from a legendary language that is still evolving? I am learning Node.js by developing a simple REST WebAPI and using it as a playground to test situations in which the main objective is to challenge Node.js and compare results and performance with .NET implementations and certain well known fast PHP implementations. Until now the results are astonishing. Summarizing: Node.js for backend is so far (in my opinion) the most recommended solution to get positive achievements in size, speed, power, concurrency, scalability, deployment and running costs.

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.NET
.NET

I use .NET Core 2.1 because it allows me to bring my OSS applications cross-platform. We're using .NET Core for everything since version 1.1- both front and back end services, or windows services. Moving to newer versions did cause us some problems though, because of the too many breaking changes brought by those versions. We really like dotnet cli extensibility model "DotnetCliTool", because we create plugin for docker build, reportgenerator.

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Richard Harding
Richard Harding
Delivering .Net consultancy at Sprydon Designs · | 1 upvotes · 11.2K views
.NET
.NET

I use .NET because because it allows me to use a functional language like F# and still get the benefit of a massively rich ecosystem of libraries and tools. Coupled with the ability to target different OSs and platforms (from cloud to mobile to IoT) it really feels like a solid investment. In my current contract we are using .Net to build REST APIs and websites - we do this using F# and the Giraffe framework (a functional wrapper on Asp.Net Core) allowing us to benefit from teh advantages of functional approach and yet leverage security and speed of Asp.Net Core. We package these as Docker containers based on an Alpine image and deploy into Azure manage Kubernetes service in the form of Helm Charts. The build and continuous delivery are handled by Azure Dev Ops.

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DaveAurionix
DaveAurionix
at GivePenny · | 5 upvotes · 15K views
atGivePennyGivePenny
.NET
.NET