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Kubernetes

Manage a cluster of Linux containers as a single system to accelerate Dev and simplify Ops
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What is Kubernetes?

Kubernetes is an open source orchestration system for Docker containers. It handles scheduling onto nodes in a compute cluster and actively manages workloads to ensure that their state matches the users declared intentions.
Kubernetes is a tool in the Container Tools category of a tech stack.
Kubernetes is an open source tool with 60.9K GitHub stars and 21.5K GitHub forks. Here鈥檚 a link to Kubernetes's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses Kubernetes?

Companies
1576 companies reportedly use Kubernetes in their tech stacks, including Google, Slack, and Shopify.

Developers
6127 developers on StackShare have stated that they use Kubernetes.

Kubernetes Integrations

CloudBees, Microsoft Azure, Semaphore, Cloud 66, and Google Compute Engine are some of the popular tools that integrate with Kubernetes. Here's a list of all 135 tools that integrate with Kubernetes.

Why developers like Kubernetes?

Here鈥檚 a list of reasons why companies and developers use Kubernetes
Kubernetes Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Kubernetes in their tech stack.

Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer | 27 upvotes 347K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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Ashish Singh
Ashish Singh
Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest | 19 upvotes 18K views
Apache Hive
Apache Hive
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Kafka
Kafka
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Presto
Presto
#DataScience
#DataEngineering
#AWS
#BigData

To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we鈥檝e worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest鈥檚 scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

#BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

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Conor Myhrvold
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber | 16 upvotes 840.1K views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
Jaeger
Jaeger
Python
Python
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
Go
Go
C++
C++
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
JavaScript
JavaScript
OpenShift
OpenShift
C#
C#
Apache Spark
Apache Spark

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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Docker
Docker
Docker Compose
Docker Compose
Jenkins
Jenkins
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
FeathersJS
FeathersJS
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
React
React
Redux
Redux
Semantic UI React
Semantic UI React
AVA
AVA
ESLint
ESLint
nginx
nginx
GitHub
GitHub
#Containerized
#Containers
#Backend
#Stack
#Frontend

Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

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Tim Specht
Tim Specht
鈥嶤o-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash | 15 upvotes 61.7K views
atDubsmashDubsmash
Python
Python
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
#PlatformAsAService
#ContainerTools

Since we deployed our very first lines of Python code more than 2 years ago we are happy users of Heroku. It lets us focus on building features rather than maintaining infrastructure, has super-easy scaling capabilities, and the support team is always happy to help (in the rare case you need them).

We played with the thought of moving our computational needs over to barebone Amazon EC2 instances or a container-management solution like Kubernetes a couple of times, but the added costs of maintaining this architecture and the ease-of-use of Heroku have kept us from moving forward so far.

Running independent services for different needs of our features gives us the flexibility to choose whatever data storage is best for the given task.

#PlatformAsAService #ContainerTools

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Kestas Barzdaitis
Kestas Barzdaitis
Entrepreneur & Engineer | 14 upvotes 81.7K views
atCodeFactorCodeFactor
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
CodeFactor.io
CodeFactor.io
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Docker
Docker
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Azure Functions
Azure Functions
Google Cloud Functions
Google Cloud Functions
#SAAS
#IAAS
#Containerization
#Autoscale
#Startup
#Automation
#Machinelearning
#AI
#Devops

CodeFactor being a #SAAS product, our goal was to run on a cloud-native infrastructure since day one. We wanted to stay product focused, rather than having to work on the infrastructure that supports the application. We needed a cloud-hosting provider that would be reliable, economical and most efficient for our product.

CodeFactor.io aims to provide an automated and frictionless code review service for software developers. That requires agility, instant provisioning, autoscaling, security, availability and compliance management features. We looked at the top three #IAAS providers that take up the majority of market share: Amazon's Amazon EC2 , Microsoft's Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.

AWS has been available since 2006 and has developed the most extensive services ant tools variety at a massive scale. Azure and GCP are about half the AWS age, but also satisfied our technical requirements.

It is worth noting that even though all three providers support Docker containerization services, GCP has the most robust offering due to their investments in Kubernetes. Also, if you are a Microsoft shop, and develop in .NET - Visual Studio Azure shines at integration there and all your existing .NET code works seamlessly on Azure. All three providers have serverless computing offerings (AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions). Additionally, all three providers have machine learning tools, but GCP appears to be the most developer-friendly, intuitive and complete when it comes to #Machinelearning and #AI.

The prices between providers are competitive across the board. For our requirements, AWS would have been the most expensive, GCP the least expensive and Azure was in the middle. Plus, if you #Autoscale frequently with large deltas, note that Azure and GCP have per minute billing, where AWS bills you per hour. We also applied for the #Startup programs with all three providers, and this is where Azure shined. While AWS and GCP for startups would have covered us for about one year of infrastructure costs, Azure Sponsorship would cover about two years of CodeFactor's hosting costs. Moreover, Azure Team was terrific - I felt that they wanted to work with us where for AWS and GCP we were just another startup.

In summary, we were leaning towards GCP. GCP's advantages in containerization, automation toolset, #Devops mindset, and pricing were the driving factors there. Nevertheless, we could not say no to Azure's financial incentives and a strong sense of partnership and support throughout the process.

Bottom line is, IAAS offerings with AWS, Azure, and GCP are evolving fast. At CodeFactor, we aim to be platform agnostic where it is practical and retain the flexibility to cherry-pick the best products across providers.

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Jobs that mention Kubernetes as a desired skillset

See all jobs

Kubernetes's Features

  • Lightweight, simple and accessible
  • Built for a multi-cloud world, public, private or hybrid
  • Highly modular, designed so that all of its components are easily swappable

Kubernetes Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Kubernetes?
Docker Swarm
Swarm serves the standard Docker API, so any tool which already communicates with a Docker daemon can use Swarm to transparently scale to multiple hosts: Dokku, Compose, Krane, Deis, DockerUI, Shipyard, Drone, Jenkins... and, of course, the Docker client itself.
Nomad
Nomad is a cluster manager, designed for both long lived services and short lived batch processing workloads. Developers use a declarative job specification to submit work, and Nomad ensures constraints are satisfied and resource utilization is optimized by efficient task packing. Nomad supports all major operating systems and virtualized, containerized, or standalone applications.
OpenStack
OpenStack is a cloud operating system that controls large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources throughout a datacenter, all managed through a dashboard that gives administrators control while empowering their users to provision resources through a web interface.
Rancher
Rancher is an open source container management platform that includes full distributions of Kubernetes, Apache Mesos and Docker Swarm, and makes it simple to operate container clusters on any cloud or infrastructure platform.
Docker Compose
With Compose, you define a multi-container application in a single file, then spin your application up in a single command which does everything that needs to be done to get it running.
See all alternatives

Kubernetes's Followers
6402 developers follow Kubernetes to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
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