What is Amazon EC2?

Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) is a web service that provides resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale computing easier for developers.
Amazon EC2 is a tool in the Cloud Hosting category of a tech stack.

Who uses Amazon EC2?

Companies
3592 companies use Amazon EC2 in their tech stacks, including medium.com, Coursera, and Twitch.

Developers
1589 developers use Amazon EC2.

Amazon EC2 Integrations

New Relic, Ansible, Vagrant, CircleCI, and Amazon EC2 Container Service are some of the popular tools that integrate with Amazon EC2. Here's a list of all 92 tools that integrate with Amazon EC2.

Why developers like Amazon EC2?

Here’s a list of reasons why companies and developers use Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2 Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Amazon EC2 in their tech stack.

Dmitry Mukhin
Dmitry Mukhin
at Uploadcare · | 20 upvotes · 17K views
atUploadcare
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
Amazon EC2
Python
Tornado

The 350M API requests we handle daily include many processing tasks such as image enhancements, resizing, filtering, face recognition, and GIF to video conversions.

Tornado is the one we currently use and aiohttp is the one we intend to implement in production in the near future. Both tools support handling huge amounts of requests but aiohttp is preferable as it uses asyncio which is Python-native. Since Python is in the heart of our service, we initially used PIL followed by Pillow. We kind of still do. When we figured resizing was the most taxing processing operation, Alex, our engineer, created the fork named Pillow-SIMD and implemented a good number of optimizations into it to make it 15 times faster than ImageMagick

Thanks to the optimizations, Uploadcare now needs six times fewer servers to process images. Here, by servers I also mean separate Amazon EC2 instances handling processing and the first layer of caching. The processing instances are also paired with AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB) which helps ingest files to the CDN.

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John-Daniel Trask
John-Daniel Trask
Co-founder & CEO at Raygun · | 19 upvotes · 19.7K views
atRaygun
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
Amazon EC2
nginx
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
#LoadBalancerReverseProxy
#CloudStorage
#WebServers
#CloudHosting

We chose AWS because, at the time, it was really the only cloud provider to choose from.

We tend to use their basic building blocks (EC2, ELB, Amazon S3, Amazon RDS) rather than vendor specific components like databases and queuing. We deliberately decided to do this to ensure we could provide multi-cloud support or potentially move to another cloud provider if the offering was better for our customers.

We’ve utilized c3.large nodes for both the Node.js deployment and then for the .NET Core deployment. Both sit as backends behind an nginx instance and are managed using scaling groups in Amazon EC2 sitting behind a standard AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB).

While we’re satisfied with AWS, we do review our decision each year and have looked at Azure and Google Cloud offerings.

#CloudHosting #WebServers #CloudStorage #LoadBalancerReverseProxy

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GitHub
nginx
ESLint
AVA
Semantic UI React
Redux
React
PostgreSQL
ExpressJS
Node.js
FeathersJS
Heroku
Amazon EC2
Kubernetes
Jenkins
Docker Compose
Docker
#Frontend
#Stack
#Backend
#Containers
#Containerized

Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

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John Kodumal
John Kodumal
CTO at LaunchDarkly · | 14 upvotes · 31.6K views
atLaunchDarkly
Kafka
Amazon Kinesis
Redis
Amazon EC2
Amazon ElastiCache
Consul
Patroni
TimescaleDB
PostgreSQL
Amazon RDS

As we've evolved or added additional infrastructure to our stack, we've biased towards managed services. Most new backing stores are Amazon RDS instances now. We do use self-managed PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB for time-series data—this is made HA with the use of Patroni and Consul.

We also use managed Amazon ElastiCache instances instead of spinning up Amazon EC2 instances to run Redis workloads, as well as shifting to Amazon Kinesis instead of Kafka.

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Tim Specht
Tim Specht
‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash · | 14 upvotes · 17.2K views
atDubsmash
Kubernetes
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Python
#ContainerTools
#PlatformAsAService

Since we deployed our very first lines of Python code more than 2 years ago we are happy users of Heroku. It lets us focus on building features rather than maintaining infrastructure, has super-easy scaling capabilities, and the support team is always happy to help (in the rare case you need them).

We played with the thought of moving our computational needs over to barebone Amazon EC2 instances or a container-management solution like Kubernetes a couple of times, but the added costs of maintaining this architecture and the ease-of-use of Heroku have kept us from moving forward so far.

Running independent services for different needs of our features gives us the flexibility to choose whatever data storage is best for the given task.

#PlatformAsAService #ContainerTools

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Jake Stein
Jake Stein
CEO at Stitch · | 13 upvotes · 31.7K views
atStitch
Go
Clojure
JavaScript
Python
Kubernetes
AWS OpsWorks
Amazon EC2
Amazon Redshift
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS

Stitch is run entirely on AWS. All of our transactional databases are run with Amazon RDS, and we rely on Amazon S3 for data persistence in various stages of our pipeline. Our product integrates with Amazon Redshift as a data destination, and we also use Redshift as an internal data warehouse (powered by Stitch, of course).

The majority of our services run on stateless Amazon EC2 instances that are managed by AWS OpsWorks. We recently introduced Kubernetes into our infrastructure to run the scheduled jobs that execute Singer code to extract data from various sources. Although we tend to be wary of shiny new toys, Kubernetes has proven to be a good fit for this problem, and its stability, strong community and helpful tooling have made it easy for us to incorporate into our operations.

While we continue to be happy with Clojure for our internal services, we felt that its relatively narrow adoption could impede Singer's growth. We chose Python both because it is well suited to the task, and it seems to have reached critical mass among data engineers. All that being said, the Singer spec is language agnostic, and integrations and libraries have been developed in JavaScript, Go, and Clojure.

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Amazon EC2's features

  • Elastic – Amazon EC2 enables you to increase or decrease capacity within minutes, not hours or days. You can commission one, hundreds or even thousands of server instances simultaneously.
  • Completely Controlled – You have complete control of your instances. You have root access to each one, and you can interact with them as you would any machine.
  • Flexible – You have the choice of multiple instance types, operating systems, and software packages. Amazon EC2 allows you to select a configuration of memory, CPU, instance storage, and the boot partition size that is optimal for your choice of operating system and application.
  • Designed for use with other Amazon Web Services – Amazon EC2 works in conjunction with Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), Amazon SimpleDB and Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS) to provide a complete solution for computing, query processing and storage across a wide range of applications.
  • Reliable – Amazon EC2 offers a highly reliable environment where replacement instances can be rapidly and predictably commissioned. The Amazon EC2 Service Level Agreement commitment is 99.95% availability for each Amazon EC2 Region.
  • Secure – Amazon EC2 works in conjunction with Amazon VPC to provide security and robust networking functionality for your compute resources.
  • Inexpensive – Amazon EC2 passes on to you the financial benefits of Amazon’s scale. You pay a very low rate for the compute capacity you actually consume.
  • Easy to Start – Quickly get started with Amazon EC2 by visiting AWS Marketplace to choose preconfigured software on Amazon Machine Images (AMIs). You can quickly deploy this software to EC2 via 1-Click launch or with the EC2 console.

Amazon EC2 Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Amazon EC2?
Amazon LightSail
Everything you need to jumpstart your project on AWS—compute, storage, and networking—for a low, predictable price. Launch a virtual private server with just a few clicks.
Amazon S3
Amazon Simple Storage Service provides a fully redundant data storage infrastructure for storing and retrieving any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service lets you launch and stop container-enabled applications with simple API calls, allows you to query the state of your cluster from a centralized service, and gives you access to many familiar Amazon EC2 features like security groups, EBS volumes and IAM roles.
Beanstalk
A single process to commit code, review with the team, and deploy the final result to your customers.
DigitalOcean
We take the complexities out of cloud hosting by offering blazing fast, on-demand SSD cloud servers, straightforward pricing, a simple API, and an easy-to-use control panel.
See all alternatives

Amazon EC2's Stats

- No public GitHub repository available -