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What is Heroku?

Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling.
Heroku is a tool in the Platform as a Service category of a tech stack.

Who uses Heroku?

Companies
1881 companies reportedly use Heroku in their tech stacks, including StackShare, Heroku, and Product Hunt.

Developers
5755 developers on StackShare have stated that they use Heroku.

Heroku Integrations

Slack, New Relic, Twilio SendGrid, Sentry, and CircleCI are some of the popular tools that integrate with Heroku. Here's a list of all 132 tools that integrate with Heroku.

Why developers like Heroku?

Here’s a list of reasons why companies and developers use Heroku
Heroku Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Heroku in their tech stack.

Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 18 upvotes · 205.6K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
vuex
vuex
Knex.js
Knex.js
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Vue.js
Vue.js
hapi
hapi
Node.js
Node.js
GitHub
GitHub
Docker
Docker
Heroku
Heroku

Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

  • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
  • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
  • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
  • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
  • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

  1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
  2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
  3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
  4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

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Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 17 upvotes · 194.6K views
atStackShareStackShare
Redis
Redis
CircleCI
CircleCI
Webpack
Webpack
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
GitHub
GitHub
Heroku
Heroku
Rails
Rails
Node.js
Node.js
Apollo
Apollo
Glamorous
Glamorous
React
React
#FrontEndRepoSplit
#Microservices
#SSR
#StackDecisionsLaunch

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 377.7K views
SonarQube
SonarQube
Codacy
Codacy
Docker
Docker
Git
Git
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Solr
Solr
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Heroku
Heroku
Hibernate
Hibernate
MySQL
MySQL
Node.js
Node.js
Java
Java
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery
jQuery
JavaScript
JavaScript
React Native
React Native
React Router
React Router
React
React

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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GitHub
GitHub
nginx
nginx
ESLint
ESLint
AVA
AVA
Semantic UI React
Semantic UI React
Redux
Redux
React
React
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
Node.js
Node.js
FeathersJS
FeathersJS
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Jenkins
Jenkins
Docker Compose
Docker Compose
Docker
Docker
#Frontend
#Stack
#Backend
#Containers
#Containerized

Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

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Tim Specht
Tim Specht
‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash · | 15 upvotes · 54.4K views
atDubsmashDubsmash
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
Python
Python
#ContainerTools
#PlatformAsAService

Since we deployed our very first lines of Python code more than 2 years ago we are happy users of Heroku. It lets us focus on building features rather than maintaining infrastructure, has super-easy scaling capabilities, and the support team is always happy to help (in the rare case you need them).

We played with the thought of moving our computational needs over to barebone Amazon EC2 instances or a container-management solution like Kubernetes a couple of times, but the added costs of maintaining this architecture and the ease-of-use of Heroku have kept us from moving forward so far.

Running independent services for different needs of our features gives us the flexibility to choose whatever data storage is best for the given task.

#PlatformAsAService #ContainerTools

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Tim Specht
Tim Specht
‎Co-Founder and CTO at Dubsmash · | 13 upvotes · 56.9K views
atDubsmashDubsmash
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Redis
Redis
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Heroku
Heroku
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
#PlatformAsAService
#Databases
#NosqlDatabaseAsAService
#SqlDatabaseAsAService

Over the years we have added a wide variety of different storages to our stack including PostgreSQL (some hosted by Heroku, some by Amazon RDS) for storing relational data, Amazon DynamoDB to store non-relational data like recommendations & user connections, or Redis to hold pre-aggregated data to speed up API endpoints.

Since we started running Postgres ourselves on RDS instead of only using the managed offerings of Heroku, we've gained additional flexibility in scaling our application while reducing costs at the same time.

We are also heavily testing Amazon RDS for Aurora in its Postgres-compatible version and will also give the new release of Aurora Serverless a try!

#SqlDatabaseAsAService #NosqlDatabaseAsAService #Databases #PlatformAsAService

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Heroku's Features

  • Agile deployment for Ruby, Node.js, Clojure, Java, Python, Go and Scala.
  • Run and scale any type of app.
  • Total visibility across your entire app.
  • Erosion-resistant architecture. Rich control surfaces.

Heroku Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Heroku?
DigitalOcean
We take the complexities out of cloud hosting by offering blazing fast, on-demand SSD cloud servers, straightforward pricing, a simple API, and an easy-to-use control panel.
Google App Engine
Google has a reputation for highly reliable, high performance infrastructure. With App Engine you can take advantage of the 10 years of knowledge Google has in running massively scalable, performance driven systems. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow.
Firebase
Firebase is a cloud service designed to power real-time, collaborative applications. Simply add the Firebase library to your application to gain access to a shared data structure; any changes you make to that data are automatically synchronized with the Firebase cloud and with other clients within milliseconds.
Docker
The Docker Platform is the industry-leading container platform for continuous, high-velocity innovation, enabling organizations to seamlessly build and share any application — from legacy to what comes next — and securely run them anywhere
Microsoft Azure
Azure is an open and flexible cloud platform that enables you to quickly build, deploy and manage applications across a global network of Microsoft-managed datacenters. You can build applications using any language, tool or framework. And you can integrate your public cloud applications with your existing IT environment.
See all alternatives

Heroku's Followers
5529 developers follow Heroku to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
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