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Ruby

A dynamic, interpreted, open source programming language with a focus on simplicity and productivity
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What is Ruby?

Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming.
Ruby is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.
Ruby is an open source tool with 17K GitHub stars and 4.5K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Ruby's open source repository on GitHub

Who uses Ruby?

Companies
4898 companies reportedly use Ruby in their tech stacks, including Airbnb, Vox Media, and Shopify.

Developers
12397 developers on StackShare have stated that they use Ruby.

Ruby Integrations

Rails, Datadog, Select2, Rollbar, and Auth0 are some of the popular tools that integrate with Ruby. Here's a list of all 187 tools that integrate with Ruby.
Private Decisions at about Ruby

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by members of with Ruby in their tech stack.

Jerome Dalbert
Jerome Dalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 4 upvotes · 2.5K views
Shared insights
on
RailsRailsRubyRuby

In the Rails app I work on, I was recently wondering where to put a Ruby constant shared by 2 classes that belong to the same module.

That constant didn't really belong to either class... Then I remembered that you can just define the constant at the module level:

# app/services/m/my_constant.rb
module M
  MY_CONSTANT = 'blah'
end

# app/services/m/a.rb
module M
  class A
    def do_something
      puts MY_CONSTANT
    end
  end
end

# app/services/m/b.rb
module M
  class B
    def do_something
      puts MY_CONSTANT
    end
  end
end

The constant is in its own file, and the Rails autoloader picks it up fine.

This is similar to what Bundler does when you create a new gem: bundle gem my_gem creates a VERSION constant in lib/my_gem/version.rb. This is a good reminder, as I sometimes forget these kinds of Ruby idioms after long periods of traditional Rails work. :-)

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I chose Sqreen because it provides an out-of-the-box Security as a Service solution to protect my customer data. I get full visibility over my application security in real-time and I reduce my risk against the most common threats. My customers are happy and I don't need to spend any engineering resources or time on this. We're only alerted when our attention is required and the data that is provided helps engineering teams easily remediate vulnerabilities. The platform grows with us and will allow us to have all the right tools in place when our first security engineer joins the company. Advanced security protections against business logic threats can then be implemented.

Installation was super easy on my Node.js and Ruby apps. But Sqreen also supports Python , Java , PHP and soon Go .

It integrates well with the tools I'm using every day Slack , PagerDuty and more.

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Shared insights
on
RubyRuby

Unit tests are written in RSpec Ruby

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Jerome Dalbert
Jerome Dalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 6 upvotes · 8.4K views
Shared insights
on
PostgreSQLPostgreSQLRailsRailsRubyRuby

Sometimes I need a quick way to store a list of things, without new PostgreSQL tables and Rails associations. I just want to add a field to an existing table and call it a day. This is useful for simple features, or when the future is uncertain.

For example, you could store T-shirt sizes in a 'S,M,L,XL' string, but then you'd have to join/split when storing/reading. What if I told you that you could delegate all this dirty work to Postgres?

You can store a ['S','M','L','XL'] array with the Postgres array type:

add_column :products, :sizes, :string, array: true, default: []

When reading the value from the DB, Rails will present it to you as a Ruby array. Nice!

And if you want to store hashes like [{ 'size': 'S', 'color': 'Red' }, { 'size': 'M', 'color': 'Green' }], Postgres' jsonb type has you covered too:

add_column :products, :sizes, :jsonb, default: []

Happy #Hacking!

#DataTypes

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John Manoogian III
John Manoogian III
Shared insights
on
RubyRuby

Nanoc, the static site generator, is written in ruby. Ruby

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Sascha Manns
Sascha Manns
at bdvb e.V. · | 1 upvotes · 1 views
Shared insights
on
RubyRuby

Ruby is my main programming language for creating classes, modules and methods to fit my plan. Ruby

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Public Decisions about Ruby

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Ruby in their tech stack.

Kamil Kowalski
Kamil Kowalski
Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 558.4K views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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Jonathan Pugh
Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 25 upvotes · 1.1M views

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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Dale Ross
Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 655.4K views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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Ronan Levesque
Ronan Levesque
Software engineer at Algolia · | 18 upvotes · 188.3K views

A few months ago we decided to move our whole static website (www.algolia.com) to a new stack. At the time we were using a website generator called Middleman, written in Ruby. As a team of only front-end developers we didn't feel very comfortable with the language itself, and the time it took to build was not satisfying. We decided to move to Gatsby to take advantage of its use of React , as well as its incredibly high performances in terms of build and page rendering.

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 1.7M views

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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Ruby Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Ruby?
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
JavaScript
JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Groovy
Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve.
See all alternatives

Ruby's Followers
11244 developers follow Ruby to keep up with related blogs and decisions.
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