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Build web applications on the same scalable systems that power Google applications

What is Google App Engine?

Google has a reputation for highly reliable, high performance infrastructure. With App Engine you can take advantage of the 10 years of knowledge Google has in running massively scalable, performance driven systems. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow.
Google App Engine is a tool in the Platform as a Service category of a tech stack.

Who uses Google App Engine?

Companies
473 companies use Google App Engine in their tech stacks, including Best Buy, Feedly, and Rovio.

Developers
329 developers use Google App Engine.

Google App Engine Integrations

SendGrid, PhpStorm, Twilio, Datadog, and Buddy are some of the popular tools that integrate with Google App Engine. Here's a list of all 23 tools that integrate with Google App Engine.

Why developers like Google App Engine?

Here’s a list of reasons why companies and developers use Google App Engine
Google App Engine Reviews

Here are some stack decisions, common use cases and reviews by companies and developers who chose Google App Engine in their tech stack.

Dmitry Mukhin
Dmitry Mukhin
at Uploadcare · | 15 upvotes · 15.8K views
atUploadcare
PostgreSQL
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon S3
Redis
Python
Google App Engine

Uploadcare has built an infinitely scalable infrastructure by leveraging AWS. Building on top of AWS allows us to process 350M daily requests for file uploads, manipulations, and deliveries. When we started in 2011 the only cloud alternative to AWS was Google App Engine which was a no-go for a rather complex solution we wanted to build. We also didn’t want to buy any hardware or use co-locations.

Our stack handles receiving files, communicating with external file sources, managing file storage, managing user and file data, processing files, file caching and delivery, and managing user interface dashboards.

At its core, Uploadcare runs on Python. The Europython 2011 conference in Florence really inspired us, coupled with the fact that it was general enough to solve all of our challenges informed this decision. Additionally we had prior experience working in Python.

We chose to build the main application with Django because of its feature completeness and large footprint within the Python ecosystem.

All the communications within our ecosystem occur via several HTTP APIs, Redis, Amazon S3, and Amazon DynamoDB. We decided on this architecture so that our our system could be scalable in terms of storage and database throughput. This way we only need Django running on top of our database cluster. We use PostgreSQL as our database because it is considered an industry standard when it comes to clustering and scaling.

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Nick Rockwell
Nick Rockwell
CTO at NY Times · | 8 upvotes · 4.8K views
atThe New York Times
Kubernetes
Google Kubernetes Engine
Google App Engine
Amazon EC2
#Migration
#Cloudmigration
#AWStoGCPmigration
#GCP
#AWS

So, the shift from Amazon EC2 to Google App Engine and generally #AWS to #GCP was a long decision and in the end, it's one that we've taken with eyes open and that we reserve the right to modify at any time. And to be clear, we continue to do a lot of stuff with AWS. But, by default, the content of the decision was, for our consumer-facing products, we're going to use GCP first. And if there's some reason why we don't think that's going to work out great, then we'll happily use AWS. In practice, that hasn't really happened. We've been able to meet almost 100% of our needs in GCP.

So it's basically mostly Google Kubernetes Engine , we're mostly running stuff on Kubernetes right now.

#AWStoGCPmigration #cloudmigration #migration

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Dan Fesp
Dan Fesp
at aliadoc.com · | 5 upvotes · 19.5K views
atAliadoc
Bitbucket
Visual Studio Code
Serverless
Google Cloud Storage
Google App Engine
Cloud Functions for Firebase
Firebase
CloudFlare
Create React App
React
#Aliadoc

In #Aliadoc, we're exploring the crowdfunding option to get traction before launch. We are building a SaaS platform for website design customization.

For the Admin UI and website editor we use React and we're currently transitioning from a Create React App setup to a custom one because our needs have become more specific. We use CloudFlare as much as possible, it's a great service.

For routing dynamic resources and proxy tasks to feed websites to the editor we leverage CloudFlare Workers for improved responsiveness. We use Firebase for our hosting needs and user authentication while also using several Cloud Functions for Firebase to interact with other services along with Google App Engine and Google Cloud Storage, but also the Real Time Database is on the radar for collaborative website editing.

We generally hate configuration but honestly because of the stage of our project we lack resources for doing heavy sysops work. So we are basically just relying on Serverless technologies as much as we can to do all server side processing.

Visual Studio Code definitively makes programming a much easier and enjoyable task, we just love it. We combine it with Bitbucket for our source code control needs.

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betocantu93
betocantu93
Intercom
Algolia
Ember.js
Google App Engine
Firebase
Go

For the backend #Backend We're using Go {json:api}, and Firebase for auth deployed in Google App Engine. Ember.js for the #frontend we have severals apps so we splitted logically with ember engines... using a monorepo to hold the whole frontend project. Using services like Algolia for super performant and complex ecommerce searching experience and Intercom chat

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Google App Engine

I use Google App Engine because it's great for setting up flask applications for some of my data workloads. The auto-scaling feature is really nice and abstracts a lot of the tedium that comes with up setting up an application.

Back in the day, using a cron job on app engine was the easiest way to automate tasks on GCP. Thankfully, that's not the case anymore. For those that want to see: Cron Job on App Engine

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betocantu93
betocantu93
MySQL
Firebase
Google App Engine
Go
Algolia
Ember.js

Ember.js Algolia Go Google App Engine Firebase MySQL

The new ember.js with SSR using fastboot+prember, without jquery and with npm easy installs via de ember-auto-import addon, angle bracket components in handlebars and ES6 classes is just a breeze to develop, we wanted to try golang for this particular project and it's ok, but I wouldn't recommend it for fast CRUDs, we might change to Elixir Phoenix for the next project, although algolia is super good there are no shortcuts for ember, we had to build them from scratch, but it works super good, we use firebase for our auth with facebook, google, phone, etc...

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Google App Engine's features

  • Zero to sixty: Scale your app automatically without worrying about managing machines.
  • Supercharged APIs: Supercharge your app with services such as Task Queue, XMPP, and Cloud SQL, all powered by the same infrastructure that powers the Google services you use every day.
  • You're in control: Manage your application with a simple, web-based dashboard allowing you to customize your app's performance.

Google App Engine Alternatives & Comparisons

What are some alternatives to Google App Engine?
Heroku
Heroku is a cloud application platform – a new way of building and deploying web apps. Heroku lets app developers spend 100% of their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling.
windows azure
Microsoft Corporation is an American multinational technology company with headquarters in Redmond, Washington.
Amazon Web Services
It provides on-demand cloud computing platforms to individuals, companies and governments. It offers reliable, scalable, and inexpensive cloud computing services.
DigitalOcean
We take the complexities out of cloud hosting by offering blazing fast, on-demand SSD cloud servers, straightforward pricing, a simple API, and an easy-to-use control panel.
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda is a compute service that runs your code in response to events and automatically manages the underlying compute resources for you. You can use AWS Lambda to extend other AWS services with custom logic, or create your own back-end services that operate at AWS scale, performance, and security.
See all alternatives

Google App Engine's Stats

- No public GitHub repository available -