Node.js vs. Spring-Boot

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What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

What is Spring-Boot?

Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
Why do developers choose Node.js?
Why do you like Node.js?

Why do developers choose Spring-Boot?
Why do you like Spring-Boot?

What are the cons of using Node.js?
Downsides of Node.js?

What are the cons of using Spring-Boot?
Downsides of Spring-Boot?

Want advice about which of these to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use Node.js?
5097 companies on StackShare use Node.js
What companies use Spring-Boot?
423 companies on StackShare use Spring-Boot
What tools integrate with Node.js?
109 tools on StackShare integrate with Node.js
What tools integrate with Spring-Boot?
3 tools on StackShare integrate with Spring-Boot

What are some alternatives to Node.js and Spring-Boot?

  • Rails - Web development that doesn't hurt
  • Android SDK - The Android SDK provides you the API libraries and developer tools necessary to build, test, and debug apps for Android.
  • Django - The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
  • Laravel - A PHP Framework For Web Artisans

See all alternatives to Node.js

Node v12.0.0 (Current)
Node v8.16.0 (LTS)
Node v11.14.0 (Current)
Related Stack Decisions
Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare | 10 upvotes 29601 views
atStackShare
Redis
CircleCI
Webpack
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon S3
GitHub
Heroku
Rails
Node.js
Apollo
Glamorous
React
#FrontEndRepoSplit
#Microservices
#SSR
#StackDecisionsLaunch

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail | 16 upvotes 19046 views
atSmartZip
Amazon DynamoDB
Ruby
Node.js
AWS Lambda
New Relic
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Elasticsearch
Superset
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Redshift
Zapier
Segment
Amazon CloudFront
Memcached
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon RDS for Aurora
MySQL
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Docker
Capistrano
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Rails API
Rails
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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Divine Bawa
Divine Bawa
at PayHub Ghana Limited | 13 upvotes 19701 views
Apollo
Next.js
styled-components
React
graphql-yoga
Prisma
MySQL
GraphQL
Node.js

I just finished a web app meant for a business that offers training programs for certain professional courses. I chose this stack to test out my skills in graphql and react. I used Node.js , GraphQL , MySQL for the #Backend utilizing Prisma as a database interface for MySQL to provide CRUD APIs and graphql-yoga as a server. For the #frontend I chose React, styled-components for styling, Next.js for routing and SSR and Apollo for data management. I really liked the outcome and I will definitely use this stack in future projects.

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