Django vs Node.js vs Rails

Django
Django

7.1K
5K
2.8K
Node.js
Node.js

27K
21.1K
7.9K
Rails
Rails

7.9K
4.9K
5.2K

What is Django?

Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design.

What is Node.js?

Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

What is Rails?

Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern.

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Why do developers choose Django?
Why do developers choose Node.js?
Why do developers choose Rails?

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What are the cons of using Django?
What are the cons of using Node.js?
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What tools integrate with Django?
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What are some alternatives to Django, Node.js, and Rails?
Flask
Flask is intended for getting started very quickly and was developed with best intentions in mind.
Laravel
It is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.
PHP
Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
WordPress
The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.
Drupal
Drupal is an open source content management platform powering millions of websites and applications. It’s built, used, and supported by an active and diverse community of people around the world.
See all alternatives
Decisions about Django, Node.js, and Rails
Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 12 upvotes · 134.2K views
atStackShareStackShare
Redis
CircleCI
Webpack
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon S3
GitHub
Heroku
Rails
Node.js
Apollo
Glamorous
React
#FrontEndRepoSplit
#Microservices
#SSR
#StackDecisionsLaunch

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Full Stack Engineering Manager at ValiMail · | 16 upvotes · 142.3K views
atSmartZipSmartZip
Amazon DynamoDB
Ruby
Node.js
AWS Lambda
New Relic
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Elasticsearch
Superset
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Redshift
Zapier
Segment
Amazon CloudFront
Memcached
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon RDS for Aurora
MySQL
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Docker
Capistrano
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Rails API
Rails
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 16.1K views
atDev As ProsDev As Pros
Twist
Slack
ESLint
JavaScript
RuboCop
Heroku
Amazon EC2
Rails
Node.js

For many(if not all) small and medium size business time and cost matter a lot.

That's why languages, frameworks, tools, and services that are easy to use and provide 0 to productive in less time, it's best.

Maybe Node.js frameworks might provide better features compared to Rails but in terms of MVPs, for us Rails is the leading alternative.

Amazon EC2 might be cheaper and more customizable than Heroku but in the initial terms of a project, you need to complete configurationos and deploy early.

Advanced configurations can be done down the road, when the project is running and making money, not before.

But moving fast isn't the only thing we care about. We also take the job to leave a good codebase from the beginning and because of that we try to follow, as much as we can, style guides in Ruby with RuboCop and in JavaScript with ESLint and StandardJS.

Finally, comunication and keeping a good history of conversations, decisions, and discussions is important so we use a mix of Slack and Twist

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Interest over time
Reviews of Django, Node.js, and Rails
Avatar of mihaicracan
Web Developer, Freelancer
Review ofNode.jsNode.js

I have benchmarked Node.js and other popular frameworks using a real life application example. You can find the results here: https://medium.com/@mihaigeorge.c/web-rest-api-benchmark-on-a-real-life-application-ebb743a5d7a3

How developers use Django, Node.js, and Rails
Avatar of StackShare
StackShare uses RailsRails

The first live version of Leanstack was actually a WordPress site. There wasn’t a whole lot going on at first. We had static pages with static content that needed to be updated manually. Then came the concept of user-generated content and we made the switch to a full on Rails app in November of last year. Nick had a lot of experience with Rails so that made the decision pretty easy. But I had also played around with Rails previously and was comfortable working with it. I also knew I’d need to hire engineers with a lot more experience building web apps than I do, so I wanted to go with a language and framework other people would have experience with. Also, the sheer number of gems and tools available for Rails is pretty amazing (shout to RubyToolbox ).

I don’t see us ever having to move away from Rails really, but I could be wrong. Leanstack was built in Rails 3. For StackShare we decided to upgrade to Rails 4. Biggest issue with that has been caching. DHH decided to remove the standard page and action caching in favor of key-based caching (source)[http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/caching_with_rails.html#page-caching]. Probably a good thing from a framework-perspective. But pretty shitty to have to learn about that after testing out your new app and realizing nothing is cached anymore :( We’ll need to spend some more time implementing "Russian Doll Caching", but for now we’ve got a random mixture of fragment and action caching (usually one or the other) based on which pages are most popular.

Avatar of Karma
Karma uses RailsRails

We use Rails for webpages and projects, not for backend services. Actually if you click through our website, you won't notice it but you're clicking though, I think, seven or eight different Rails projects. We tie those all together with a front-end library that we wrote, which basically makes sure that you have a consistent experience over all these different Rails apps.

It's a gem, we call it Karmeleon. It's not a gem that we released. It's an internal gem. Basically what it does is it makes sure that we have a consistent layout across multiple Rails apps. Then we can share stuff like a menu bar or footer or that kind of stuff.

So if we start a new front end project it's always a Rails application. We pull in the Karmeleon gem with all our styling stuff and then basically the application is almost ready to be deployed. That would be an empty page, but you would still have top bar, footer, you have some custom components that you can immediately use. So it kind of bootstraps our entire project to be a front end project.

Avatar of MaxCDN
MaxCDN uses Node.jsNode.js

We decided to move the provisioning process to an API-driven process, and had to decide among a few implementation languages:

  • Go, the server-side language from Google
  • NodeJS, an asynchronous framework in Javascript

We built prototypes in both languages, and decided on NodeJS:

  • NodeJS is asynchronous-by-default, which suited the problem domain. Provisioning is more like “start the job, let me know when you’re done” than a traditional C-style program that’s CPU-bound and needs low-level efficiency.
  • NodeJS acts as an HTTP-based service, so exposing the API was trivial

Getting into the headspace and internalizing the assumptions of a tool helps pick the right one. NodeJS assumes services will be non-blocking/event-driven and HTTP-accessible, which snapped into our scenario perfectly. The new NodeJS architecture resulted in a staggering 95% reduction in processing time: requests went from 7.5 seconds to under a second.

Avatar of Trello
Trello uses Node.jsNode.js

The server side of Trello is built in Node.js. We knew we wanted instant propagation of updates, which meant that we needed to be able to hold a lot of open connections, so an event-driven, non-blocking server seemed like a good choice. Node also turned out to be an amazing prototyping tool for a single-page app. The prototype version of the Trello server was really just a library of functions that operated on arrays of Models in the memory of a single Node.js process, and the client simply invoked those functions through a very thin wrapper over a WebSocket. This was a very fast way for us to get started trying things out with Trello and making sure that the design was headed in the right direction. We used the prototype version to manage the development of Trello and other internal projects at Fog Creek.

Avatar of AngeloR
AngeloR uses Node.jsNode.js

All backend code is done in node.js

We have a SOA for our systems. It isn't quite Microservices jsut yet, but it does provide domain encapsulation for our systems allowing the leaderboards to fail without affecting the login or education content.

We've written a few internal modules including a very simple api framework.

I ended up picking Node.js because the game client is entirely in JavaScript as well. This choice made it a lot easier for developers to cross borders between being "client side" game developers and "server side" game developers. It also meant that the pool of knowledge/best practices is applicable almost across the company.

Avatar of Tony Manso
Tony Manso uses Node.jsNode.js

Node.js is the foundation for the server. Using Express.js for serving up web content, and sockets.io for synchronizing communications between all clients and the server, the entire game runs as Javascript in Node.js.

I don't know how well this will scale if/when I have hundreds of people connected simultaneously, but I suspect that when that time comes, it may be just a matter of increasing the hardware.

As for why I chose Node.js... I just love JavaScript! My code is all original, meaning that I didn't have to inherit anyone's bad Javascript. I'm perfectly capable of creating my own bad Javascript, thank you! Also, npm rocks!

Avatar of Tarun Singh
Tarun Singh uses Node.jsNode.js

Used node.js server as backend. Interacts with MongoDB using MongoSkin package which is a wrapper for the MongoDB node.js driver. It uses express for routing and cors package for enabling cors and eyes package for enhancing readability of logs. Also I use nodemon which takes away the effort to restart the server after making changes.

Avatar of Instacart
Instacart uses RailsRails

Web has always been in Rails from the beginning, so we used Redis for caching our items, which we had, from the beginning. Rails is kind of what we were comfortable with, and we knew we wanted the front end to be really, really snappy, so we de-normalized all the item attributes into Redis, and that's how it got served out.

Avatar of Tim Lucas
Tim Lucas uses RailsRails

Rails 5 (beta 3) provided a nice structure for rendering responses, linking to front-end assets (compiled previously via Webpack), handling sessions w/ tailor made login links via an email button/token, background jobs, and creating an admin behind basic auth to allow managing of users and purchases.

Avatar of MOKA Analytics
MOKA Analytics uses DjangoDjango

Django takes the hassle out of building an enterprise web application using Python.

  • admin app for administration
  • ORM for deploying against different database vendors
  • social auth package for authentication with enterprise IdP
  • guardian package for authorization
Avatar of Ngakkan Nyaagu
Ngakkan Nyaagu uses RailsRails

For this project rails was ideal due to new features introduced in Rails 5 that allowed us to build a lightweight "API only" project. Developer familiarity and the ability to rapidly iterate, as well as providing an accessible testing framework were additional factors.

Avatar of Yaakov Gesher
Yaakov Gesher uses DjangoDjango

Our backend was written in Django. We took advantage of the ready-to-go admin interface as a go-to solution for the client to be able to authorize his users, as well as other functionality, while most of the work was done through the Django Rest Framework.

Avatar of Blair Gemmer
Blair Gemmer uses DjangoDjango

Hands down the best Python web framework I've used. Very easy to extend and add apps and go from 0 to full project quickly and painlessly. I built a fully authenticated project with a single endpoint in less than 30 minutes.

Avatar of Kang Hyeon Ku
Kang Hyeon Ku uses DjangoDjango

정말 편리하고 많은것을 알아서 제공해 주는 프레임워크 이다. 책의 예제만 진행해서 많이 써보지는 못했지만, 쉽게 쉽게 웹을 개발 할 수 있는 점이 매력적 이다. 게다가 orm 이 기본으로 내장 되어 있고 db 도 sqlite 가 기본으로 되어있어. 그냥 django 만 설치하면 바로 웹개발이 가능하다.

Avatar of Seungkwon Park
Seungkwon Park uses DjangoDjango

django는 저의 무기입니다.

django 이외에 flask로 간단한 restful api를 만들면서 느낀점은 framework 보다 언어가 중요하다는것을 알았고 django가 얼마나 큰 framework인지 알게되었습니다.

저는 signal 사용을 좋아합니다.

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