HTML5 vs JavaScript vs Python

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HTML5
HTML5

36.3K
30.2K
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2.2K
JavaScript
JavaScript

80.5K
66K
+ 1
7.4K
Python
Python

50.6K
43.6K
+ 1
6K
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What is HTML5?

HTML5 is a core technology markup language of the Internet used for structuring and presenting content for the World Wide Web. As of October 2014 this is the final and complete fifth revision of the HTML standard of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). The previous version, HTML 4, was standardised in 1997.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

What is Python?

Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
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    What are some alternatives to HTML5, JavaScript, and Python?
    Android SDK
    Android provides a rich application framework that allows you to build innovative apps and games for mobile devices in a Java language environment.
    WordPress
    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.
    Java
    Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
    AngularJS
    AngularJS lets you write client-side web applications as if you had a smarter browser. It lets you use good old HTML (or HAML, Jade and friends!) as your template language and lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your application’s components clearly and succinctly. It automatically synchronizes data from your UI (view) with your JavaScript objects (model) through 2-way data binding.
    PHP
    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about HTML5, JavaScript, and Python
    Jonathan Pugh
    Jonathan Pugh
    Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 24 upvotes · 886.6K views
    Framework7
    Framework7
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Figma
    Figma
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Babel
    Babel
    Ruby
    Ruby
    HTML5
    HTML5
    CouchDB
    CouchDB
    Pouchdb
    Pouchdb
    Font Awesome
    Font Awesome
    Apache Cordova
    Apache Cordova
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    PhoneGap
    PhoneGap
    #Css
    #CSS3
    #SCSS
    #Sass
    #Less
    #Electron
    #HandleBars
    #Template7
    #Sketch
    #GraphQL
    #HTML5
    #GraphCool

    I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

    For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

    Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

    I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

    I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

    I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

    I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

    For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

    For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

    For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

    I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

    So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 21 upvotes · 310.6K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Vuetify
    Vuetify
    Amazon Cognito
    Amazon Cognito

    At FundsCorner, when we set out to pick up the front-end tech stack (around Dec 2017), we drove our decision based on the following considerations:

    (1) We were clear that we will NOT have a hybrid app. We will start with Responsive Web & once there is traction, we will rollout our Android App. However, we wanted to ensure that the users have a consistent experience on both the Web & the App. So, the front-end framework must also have a material design component library which we can choose from.

    (2) Before joining FundsCorner as a CTO, I had already worked with Angular. I enjoyed working with Angular, but I felt that I must choose something that will provide us with the fastest time from Concept to Reality.

    (3) I am strong proponent of segregating HTML & JavaScript. I.e. I was not for writing or generating HTML through JavaScript. Because, this will mean that the Front-end developers I have to hire will always be very strong on JavaScript alongside HTML5 & CSS. I was looking for a Framework that was on JavaScript but not HEAVY on JavaScript.

    (3) The first iteration of the web app was to be done by myself. But I was clear that when someone takes up the mantle, they will be able to come up the curve fast.

    In the end, Vue.js and Vuetify satisfied all the above criteria with aplomb! When I did our first POC on Vue.js I could not believe that front-end development could be this fast. The documentation was par excellence and all the required essentials that come along with the Framework (viz. Routing, Store, Validations) etc. were available from the same community! It was also a breeze to integrate with other JavaScript libraries (such as Amazon Cognito).

    By picking Vuetify, we were able to provide a consistent UI experience between our Web App and Native App, besides making the UI development ultra blazing fast!

    In the end, we were able to rollout our Web App in record 6 weeks (that included the end to end Loan Origination flow, Loans management system & Customer engagement module). www.jeyabalaji.com

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    Omid Farhang
    Omid Farhang
    Sr. Full Stack Developer · | 11 upvotes · 106.4K views
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Bootstrap
    Bootstrap
    gulp
    gulp
    GitHub Pages
    GitHub Pages
    GitHub
    GitHub
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics

    Developing static sites like a landing page for mobile app or just a personal resume using HTML5 and Bootstrap is a lot fun when you are using build tools like gulp . I made a personal resume using above tools and published them on GitHub Pages. It was fast and easy, Thanks to GitHub for the free service. All the JavaScript codes worked perfectly after being concat and minified and uglified by gulp and running perfectly on GitHub Pages. gulp created sitemap and inserted Google Analytics code into all pages and saved about 30% of images size by compressing them during build.

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    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Linux
    Linux
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Swift
    Swift
    Java
    Java
    PHP
    PHP
    Python
    Python
    XML
    XML
    JSON
    JSON
    Git
    Git
    SVN (Subversion)
    SVN (Subversion)

    I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

    • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

    • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

    • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

    • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

    • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

    • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

    • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

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    Epistol
    Epistol
    Laravel
    Laravel
    PhpStorm
    PhpStorm
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics
    Sass
    Sass
    HTML5
    HTML5
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Webpack
    Webpack
    Buddy
    Buddy
    nginx
    nginx
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Git
    Git
    Deployer
    Deployer
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare
    Let's Encrypt
    Let's Encrypt
    Stripe
    Stripe
    Asana
    Asana
    Bulma
    Bulma
    PHP
    PHP
    #CDG
    CDG

    I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

    Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

    As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

    To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

    CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

    Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

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    Markus Reynolds
    Markus Reynolds
    HTML5
    HTML5
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    JavaScript
    JavaScript

    I use HTML5 because it's mandatory. Everyone who isn't a programmer should learn this as their first language because you can instantly get visual feedback for what you did. It's also one of the easiest languages to learn as it's just a markup language to display content. Learning this and then CSS 3 and then JavaScript should be the future of what everyone has to learn.

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    Node.js
    Node.js
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Django
    Django
    Python
    Python

    Django or NodeJS? Hi, I’m thinking about which software I should use for my web-app. What about Node.js or Django for the back-end? I want to create an online preparation course for the final school exams in my country. At the beginning for maths. The course should contain tutorials and a lot of exercises of different types. E.g. multiple choice, user text/number input and drawing tasks. The exercises should change (different levels) with the learning progress. Wrong questions should asked again with different numbers. I also want a score system and statistics. So far, I have got only limited web development skills. (some HTML, CSS, Bootstrap and Wordpress). I don’t know JavaScript or Python.

    Possible pros for Python / Django: - easy syntax, easier to learn for me as a beginner - fast development, earlier release - libraries for mathematical and scientific computation

    Possible pros for JavaScript / Node.js: - great performance, better choice for real time applications: user should get the answer for a question quickly

    Which software would you use in my case? Are my arguments for Python/NodeJS right? Which kind of database would you use?

    Thank you for your answer!

    Node.js JavaScript Django Python

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    Go
    Go
    Python
    Python
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    NATS
    NATS
    Docker
    Docker
    Git
    Git

    Go is a high performance language with simple syntax / semantics. Although it is not as expressive as some other languages, it's still a great language for backend development.

    Python is expressive and battery-included, and pre-installed in most linux distros, making it a great language for scripting.

    PostgreSQL: Rock-solid RDBMS with NoSQL support.

    TypeScript saves you from all nonsense semantics of JavaScript , LOL.

    NATS: fast message queue and easy to deploy / maintain.

    Docker makes deployment painless.

    Git essential tool for collaboration and source management.

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    React
    React
    Redux
    Redux
    FeathersJS
    FeathersJS
    HTML5
    HTML5
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Redis
    Redis
    Socket.IO
    Socket.IO
    ES6
    ES6

    I have always been interested in building a real-time multiplayer game engine that could be massively scalable, and recently I decided to start working on a MMO version of the classic "snake" game. I wanted the entire #Stack to be based on ES6 JavaScript so for the #Backend I chose to use FeathersJS with MongoDB for game/user data storage, Redis for distributed mutex and pub/sub, and Socket.IO for real-time communication. For the #Frontend I used React with Redux.js, the FeathersJS client as well as HTML5 canvas to render the view.

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    Tom Klein
    Tom Klein
    CEO at Gentlent · | 4 upvotes · 46.7K views
    atGentlentGentlent
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Node.js
    Node.js
    PHP
    PHP
    HTML5
    HTML5
    Sass
    Sass
    nginx
    nginx
    React
    React
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    ES6
    ES6
    TypeScript
    TypeScript
    Google Compute Engine
    Google Compute Engine
    Socket.IO
    Socket.IO
    Electron
    Electron
    Python
    Python

    Our most used programming languages are JavaScript / Node.js for it's lightweight and fast use, PHP because everyone knows it, HTML5 because you can't live without it and Sass to write great CSS. Occasionally, we use nginx as a web server and proxy, React for our UX, PostgreSQL as fast relational database, Ubuntu as server OS, ES6 and TypeScript for Node, Google Compute Engine for our infrastructure, and Socket.IO and Electron for specific use cases. We also use Python for some of our backends.

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    Nicolas Theck
    Nicolas Theck
    Student at RocketPlay · | 3 upvotes · 49.8K views
    atRocketPlayRocketPlay
    HTML5
    HTML5
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Webpack
    Webpack
    GitLab
    GitLab
    GitLab CI
    GitLab CI
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    npm
    npm
    nginx
    nginx
    CloudFlare
    CloudFlare
    ExpressJS
    ExpressJS
    Sequelize
    Sequelize
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    JSON Web Token
    JSON Web Token
    PM2
    PM2
    OVH
    OVH
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Twilio SendGrid
    Twilio SendGrid
    #Frontend
    #Backend
    #Pulsejs
    #Passport
    #Ns

    We use JavaScript in both our #Frontend and #Backend. Front-End wise, we're using tools like Vue.js , Webpack (for dev & building), pulsejs . For delivering the content, we push to GitLab & use GitLab CI (running on our own Ubuntu machine) to install (with npm) our packages, build the app trough Webpack and finally push it to our nginx server via a folder. From there, use accessing the website will get cached content thanks to CloudFlare. Back-End wise, we again use JavaScript with tools such as ExpressJS (http server), Sequelize (database, server running on PostgreSQL ) but also JSON Web Token with passport to authenticate our users. Same process used in front-end is used for back-end, we just copy files to a dist where PM2 watches for any change made to the Node.js app. Traffic doesn't go trough CloudFlare for upload process reasons but our nginx reverse proxy handles the request (which do go trough CloudFlare SSL-wise, since we're using their ns servers with our OVH domain.) Other utils we use are SendGrid for email sending & obviously HTML5 for the base Vue.js app. I hope this article will tell you more about the Tech we use here at RocketPlay :p

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    Tassanai Singprom
    Tassanai Singprom
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    PHP
    PHP
    HTML5
    HTML5
    jQuery
    jQuery
    Redis
    Redis
    Amazon EC2
    Amazon EC2
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    Sass
    Sass
    Vue.js
    Vue.js
    Firebase
    Firebase
    Laravel
    Laravel
    Lumen
    Lumen
    Amazon RDS
    Amazon RDS
    GraphQL
    GraphQL
    MariaDB
    MariaDB
    Google Analytics
    Google Analytics
    Postman
    Postman
    Elasticsearch
    Elasticsearch
    Git
    Git
    GitHub
    GitHub
    GitLab
    GitLab
    npm
    npm
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Kibana
    Kibana
    Sentry
    Sentry
    BrowserStack
    BrowserStack
    Slack
    Slack

    This is my stack in Application & Data

    JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

    My Utilities Tools

    Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

    My Devops Tools

    Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

    My Business Tools

    Slack

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    Adam Bavosa
    Adam Bavosa
    Python
    Python
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    asyncio
    asyncio
    PubNub
    PubNub

    I love Python and JavaScript . You can do the same JavaScript async operations in Python by using asyncio. This is particularly useful when you need to do socket programming in Python. With streaming sockets, data can be sent or received at any time. In case your Python program is in the middle of executing some code, other threads can handle the new socket data. Libraries like asyncio implement multiple threads, so your Python program can work in an asynchronous fashion. PubNub makes bi-directional data streaming between devices even easier.

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    Helio Junior
    Helio Junior
    Python
    Python
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    #DataScience
    #UXdesign
    #NodeJS
    #Electron

    Python is a excellent tool for #DataScience , but up to now is very poor in #uxdesign . To do some design I'm using JavaScript and #nodejs , #electron stack. The possibility of use CSS 3 to draw interfaces is very awesome and fast. Unfortunatelly Python don't have (yet) a good way to make a #UXdesign .

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    Bryam Rodriguez
    Bryam Rodriguez
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Rails
    Rails
    React
    React
    Redux
    Redux
    Create React App
    Create React App
    Jest
    Jest
    react-testing-library
    react-testing-library
    RSpec
    RSpec
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    Redis
    Redis
    React Native
    React Native
    Next.js
    Next.js
    Python
    Python
    Bit
    Bit
    JavaScript
    JavaScript

    I'm working as one of the engineering leads in RunaHR. As our platform is a Saas, we thought It'd be good to have an API (We chose Ruby and Rails for this) and a SPA (built with React and Redux ) connected. We started the SPA with Create React App since It's pretty easy to start.

    We use Jest as the testing framework and react-testing-library to test React components. In Rails we make tests using RSpec.

    Our main database is PostgreSQL, but we also use MongoDB to store some type of data. We started to use Redis  for cache and other time sensitive operations.

    We have a couple of extra projects: One is an Employee app built with React Native and the other is an internal back office dashboard built with Next.js for the client and Python in the backend side.

    Since we have different frontend apps we have found useful to have Bit to document visual components and utils in JavaScript.

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    Interest over time
    Reviews of HTML5, JavaScript, and Python
    Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

    excellent!!

    How developers use HTML5, JavaScript, and Python
    Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
    Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

    • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
    • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
    • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
    • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
    • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
    • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
    • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
    • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
    • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
    • Configuration was done with json files.

    The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

    Avatar of Exchange rates API
    Exchange rates API uses PythonPython

    Beautiful is better than ugly.

    Explicit is better than implicit.

    Simple is better than complex.

    Complex is better than complicated.

    Flat is better than nested.

    Sparse is better than dense.

    Readability counts.

    Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.

    Although practicality beats purity.

    Errors should never pass silently.

    Unless explicitly silenced.

    In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.

    There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.

    Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.

    Now is better than never.

    Although never is often better than right now.

    If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.

    If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.

    Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

    Avatar of OutSystems
    OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

    OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

    Avatar of Gorka Llona
    Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

    Avatar of OutSystems
    OutSystems uses HTML5HTML5

    Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with HTML here.

    At the user interface level, the platform provides a rich visual editor that allows web interfaces to be composed by dragging and dropping. Instead of purely writing HTML, developers use visual widgets. These widgets are wrapped and are easy to reuse just by dragging and dropping without everyone needing to understand how they are built.

    Avatar of Cloudcraft
    Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!