Alternatives to ScaleGrid logo

Alternatives to ScaleGrid

Atlas, MongoDB Atlas, MongoLab, Compose, and ObjectRocket are the most popular alternatives and competitors to ScaleGrid.
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What is ScaleGrid and what are its top alternatives?

ScaleGrid is a fully managed Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) solution for MongoDB, Redis, MySQL, and PostgreSQL on AWS, Azure, DigitalOcean, VMware and OpenStack. Automate your database operations in the cloud so you can get back to product.
ScaleGrid is a tool in the MongoDB Hosting category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to ScaleGrid

  • Atlas

    Atlas

    Atlas is one foundation to manage and provide visibility to your servers, containers, VMs, configuration management, service discovery, and additional operations services. ...

  • MongoDB Atlas

    MongoDB Atlas

    MongoDB Atlas is a global cloud database service built and run by the team behind MongoDB. Enjoy the flexibility and scalability of a document database, with the ease and automation of a fully managed service on your preferred cloud. ...

  • MongoLab

    MongoLab

    mLab is the largest cloud MongoDB service in the world, hosting over a half million deployments on AWS, Azure, and Google. ...

  • Compose

    Compose

    Compose makes it easy to spin up multiple open source databases with just one click. Deploy MongoDB for production, take Redis out for a performance test drive, or spin up RethinkDB in development before rolling it out to production. ...

  • ObjectRocket

    ObjectRocket

    Fast, scalable, and reliably-managed Mongo DB, Redis, Elasticsearch, PostgreSQL, CockroachDB and TimescaleDB. An easy to use DBaaS (database as a service) platform on private or public cloud. Complete DB Management & Administration. ...

ScaleGrid alternatives & related posts

Atlas logo

Atlas

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Develop, deploy, and maintain your application anywhere. Use one console and one workflow from development to production
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PROS OF ATLAS
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF ATLAS
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      related Atlas posts

      MongoDB Atlas logo

      MongoDB Atlas

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      Deploy and scale a MongoDB cluster in the cloud with just a few clicks
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      PROS OF MONGODB ATLAS
      • 9
        MongoDB SaaS for and by Mongo, makes it so easy
      • 6
        Amazon VPC peering
      • 4
        MongoDB atlas is GUItool through you can manage all DB
      • 3
        Built-in data browser
      • 3
        Use it anywhere
      • 3
        Granular role-based access controls
      • 2
        Cloud instance to be worked with
      • 1
        Simple and easy to integrate
      CONS OF MONGODB ATLAS
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        related MongoDB Atlas posts

        Repost

        Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

        Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

        Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

        Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

        See more
        Gregory Koberger

        We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

        There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

        See more
        MongoLab logo

        MongoLab

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        Database-as-a-Service for MongoDB
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        PROS OF MONGOLAB
        • 61
          Development free tier
        • 46
          Easy setup
        • 38
          Scalable mongo hosting
        • 25
          Heroku plugin
        • 14
          REST API
        • 9
          High availability
        • 9
          Geospatial support
        • 5
          Replication and backups
        • 5
          Premium support
        • 2
          Multi-cloud
        • 1
          Largest and most experienced
        • 1
          Azure Add-on
        CONS OF MONGOLAB
        • 1
          Lab bought by MongoDB. Being replaced by Atlas

        related MongoLab posts

        Gregory Koberger

        We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

        There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

        See more
        Compose logo

        Compose

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        We host databases for busy devs: production-ready, cloud-hosted, open source.
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        PROS OF COMPOSE
        • 42
          Simple to set up
        • 32
          One-click mongodb
        • 29
          Automated Backups
        • 23
          Designed to scale
        • 21
          Easy interface
        • 13
          Fast and Simple
        • 10
          Real-Time Monitoring
        • 7
          Fastest MongoDB Available
        • 6
          Great Design
        • 6
          REST API
        • 4
          Easy to set up
        • 3
          Free for testing
        • 3
          Geospatial support
        • 2
          Elasticsearch
        • 2
          Heroku Add-on
        • 1
          Automated Health Checks
        • 1
          Email Support
        • 1
          Query Logs
        CONS OF COMPOSE
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          related Compose posts

          Gregory Koberger

          We went with MongoDB , almost by mistake. I had never used it before, but I knew I wanted the *EAN part of the MEAN stack, so why not go all in. I come from a background of SQL (first MySQL , then PostgreSQL ), so I definitely abused Mongo at first... by trying to turn it into something more relational than it should be. But hey, data is supposed to be relational, so there wasn't really any way to get around that.

          There's a lot I love about MongoDB, and a lot I hate. I still don't know if we made the right decision. We've been able to build much quicker, but we also have had some growing pains. We host our databases on MongoDB Atlas , and I can't say enough good things about it. We had tried MongoLab and Compose before it, and with MongoDB Atlas I finally feel like things are in a good place. I don't know if I'd use it for a one-off small project, but for a large product Atlas has given us a ton more control, stability and trust.

          See more
          ObjectRocket logo

          ObjectRocket

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          An easy to use, fully hosted and managed database platform
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          PROS OF OBJECTROCKET
          • 2
            Scalable
          • 2
            Easy to spin up an Instance
          • 2
            Use it anywhere
          • 2
            Fast
          • 2
            Easily customized
          • 2
            Mobile-friendly
          • 2
            24/7/365 Support
          • 2
            CockroachDB management
          CONS OF OBJECTROCKET
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            related ObjectRocket posts