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Akka vs Python: What are the differences?

Akka: Build powerful concurrent & distributed applications more easily. Akka is a toolkit and runtime for building highly concurrent, distributed, and resilient message-driven applications on the JVM; Python: A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java. Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.

Akka belongs to "Concurrency Frameworks" category of the tech stack, while Python can be primarily classified under "Languages".

"Great concurrency model" is the top reason why over 22 developers like Akka, while over 1020 developers mention "Great libraries" as the leading cause for choosing Python.

Akka and Python are both open source tools. It seems that Python with 25K GitHub stars and 10.3K forks on GitHub has more adoption than Akka with 9.99K GitHub stars and 3.03K GitHub forks.

According to the StackShare community, Python has a broader approval, being mentioned in 2789 company stacks & 3500 developers stacks; compared to Akka, which is listed in 75 company stacks and 54 developer stacks.

Advice on Akka and Python
Needs advice
on
Python
Django
and
C#

Hi all, I have been working on the development and automation of construction software using C# and Python. Recently I have started working on Django python web framework and basic frontend for web development. I am really confused to choose between C# and Python to move forward in my career. Seeking your advice on these technologies and their future market value from a career perspective. Thanks,

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Replies (3)
ALESSIO SALTARIN
Master IT Architect at IBM · | 10 upvotes · 37.3K views
Recommends
Python
Django
C#

In my opinion, a modern developer should have deep knowledge about Object Oriented (OOP) and Functional Programming (FP). The programming language is something that must come later. Any good programmer should be able to switch from one programming language to another easily, if they follow OOP and FP. There are languages, though, that must absolutely be in the portfolio of a modern developer: Java, C#, Python and JavaScript. But be prepared to know also Scala, Kotlin, Swift, Go, Ruby, Rust and TypeScript.

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Carlos Iglesias
Recommends

C# and Python are both great languages. With great communities, libraries, frameworks, opportunities. I think it will be the same in a near future.

It’s matter of your likes, and your next jobs.

Dot net core is a little faster on performance. Python more popular with dynamic types. Probably the most lovable language.

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Recommends
Django

It depends on your preferred career path, if you want to work in start-up/scale-up environments, you probably want to go with a language like Django for the rapid development (fast to production). On the other hand, C# or Java would be better for building long term and large scaled applications, although, Django could certainly achieve this as well. I also want to second that it won't hurt to know both languages, pick your technologies wisely according to the use case, don't stick to a single technology stack. :)

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Needs advice
on
Python
JavaScript
and
C++

Hi, I'm just starting to learn code, and I stumbled upon this website. I think I should learn JavaScript, Python, and C++ to begin with. I'm a quick learner so I am only worried about what would be more useful. Suppose my goal is to build an online clothing store or something. Then what languages would be best? I need advice. Please help me out. I'm 13 and just beginning and it's hard to understand when people use technical terms so please keep it simple. Thanks a lot.

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Replies (8)
Taimoor Mirza
Associate Software Engineer at Intech Process Automation · | 21 upvotes · 57.7K views
Recommends
Python

Go with Python. It's syntax is really simple and less verbose compare to others. You can use Python for basically anything like web dev, task automation, data science, data engineering, cybersecurity etc. At initial level, it's more important to get an understanding of programming fundamentals. Once you get conformable with coding in general, then you can explore other languages.

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I would worry less about languages when you're first starting out. If you want to build an online store, then javascript is a great language that is used all over the web! Get comfortable with your first language, learn some computer science concepts and how to build things the right way, and then just work towards a goal and learn as you go!

https://www.w3schools.com/ is a great resource and it's completely free, everything you need to know to build a website is on that page if you have the drive to learn it. Best of luck to you!

Here's a neat roadmap too, in case you find yourself lost on what to learn next https://roadmap.sh/frontend

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Recommends
JavaScript

I recommend JavaScript to build your first website, for both FrontEnd and BackEnd , even tho I am a BIG fan of C++ it is not well suited yet to create websites, and Python would be just as good for the BackEnd as JavaScript but having everything written in only one language will make your learning curve way easier, so it is easy to recommend JavaScript.

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Python is an easy and beginner-friendly language. As you've mentioned about Online Clothing store, you'll need to deal with the website part and you'll need Javascript to make the site accessible and functional. Javascript will be more easy to learn if you learn Python first, so you can just start with Python.

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Recommends
JavaScript

I have worked with all these a ton. I make ecommerce and enterprise apps now. The only one of these you need is JavaScript. You can use JS on the backend as Node.js in AWS Lambda. You will need HTML and CSS skills, as well as a database. I recommend MongoDB. Please forget about C++ until you built your first company. Python fits the same purpose as Node.js but is currently popular in the Data Science community so skip it until you have a LOT of customers.

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Recommends
Python
Flask

Hello Rachel, as a fellow programmer, I am glad that you are planning on expanding your coding knowledge and skills.

I recommend learning python first as it has a very simple syntax (syntax is how your code looks and how simple it is to type) and is also very user-friendly. Once you get to know how to code in python, you can use this thing called Flask.

Flask is what you call a "web application framework" or a WAF, it basically is a tool used to develop websites and other similar things. You don't have to worry much about it's difficulty because it is based on python. You will still have to learn how to use Flask though as it could be a bit complicating in first glance.

If you are looking for simpler ways for making website without having to learn a lot of programming, you can learn HTML and CSS. These 2 will help you in making a basic and functional website. The catch is, from a career perspective, HTML won't get you far, as literally every programmer knows it. So it is best to use programming languages.

I hope this gave you a clear understanding of the ways in which you can build websites. Wishing you the best of luck!

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John Akhilomen

Since you're new, I'd recommend Javascript and Python. With Javascript, just learn React and Node. And with Python, learn Django. With JavaScript, Node, React, Python, and Django; you can accomplish quite a lot for both frontend and backend.

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Recommends
WordPress

Hi, When saying that "Suppose my goal is to build an online clothing store or something", I would go for a ready to use platform like Wordpress. it will give you a fast jump into the online world. By using WP you'll have to catch on with PHP\JQuery Goodluck.. Ping me when store is ready, I might buy something....

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Needs advice
on
Python
JavaScript
and
Java

I am new to programming and am a university student. While Computer Science is not my area of study, I am majoring in a subject that branches off computer science and health informatics, which deals with databases. I am currently in a programming fundamentals course at my university. My instructor mentioned that he develops in Java, but I have heard many good things about Python and JavaScript before taking his course; while we are only doing the fundamentals, I believe he is teaching us some in Java.

Since I am new to this, I'm not sure what I like more. I have also been self-teaching before this course but have not gotten deep into a particular language's fundamentals. I want to decide on a language and stick to it before I move to a new one after the first language is learned, but it is difficult deciding which language to start with. I want to develop medical software and medical mobile apps.

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Replies (11)
Dimelo Waterson
Recommends
Java

There's a reason many universities start with Java- it has strict rules and lays out code in a straightforward (if excessively-boiler-plate-heavy) way. For a beginner, Java is an excellent way to learn the fundamentals of programming before taking off the training wheels and continuing in more flexible, less-syntactically-rigorous direction like Python or JavaScript.

Sticking to a language before moving on is a common goal. However, in reality you are going to transition as you find languages that better suit you or your organization's requirements. Start with Java, not because it is optimal for your end goals, but because it will teach you what you like and dislike about programming and because your instructor is more familiar with it. That will give you a valuable perspective and allow you to make a more informed decision later.

There are many ways to solve problems in different languages, but the "best" language pragmatically is the one that you feel most comfortable using. In that respect, programming is like woodworking- you want to let the tool do the work. If there is another language that is "better" objectively but more difficult or confusing to you, you will counteract the anticipated benefits by having to struggle to write code.

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Recommends
Java

The only way to solve this problem while avoiding opinions and tastes is to objectively look at what you are trying to build.

Thus the most efficient part of your question is your last sentence: you want to build medical software and medical mobile apps.

In that case, the answer is definitely Java, as is for all "real" software projects.

Python is good for data science, in other words for statistics. Its other competitive advantage is that it is easy to learn for beginners, but that would be a bad reason to use it for a "real" software project.

JavaScript is a mess you don't want to get into. The major reason why it's popular is that many people learn it first, because its very basic features are easy to learn, although they don't get you far, and because it used to have exclusivity on the web. But in reality it will make your life a lot harder after a few weeks, without any benefit. I know I'll get criticisms for that, but I stand fully by this position.

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Taimoor Mirza
Associate Software Engineer at Intech Process Automation · | 4 upvotes · 39K views
Recommends
Python
Java

Since you're already taking a CS course which involves Java, I would recommend you to keep learning it. Java's statically typed & OO nature forces you to learn a lot of important yet common programming fundamentles. C++, C# and Java type languages also force you write code more carefully (you have to think about the data types on your own and even allocate/de-allocate memories [C++ pointers]). That's why colleges prefer it as go to language for teaching CS concepts.

On the other hand, JS, Python and other such languages are dynamic in nature and hence, easy to learn. But you can't learn certain concepts (polymorphism, abstract classes, diamond problem etc) using these languages. So it makes sense to stick with Java in your case.

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Recommends
Python

try with python because easy ... its good for u when u are learning basic's and they have many library that help's u with mobile app and desktop application but it is not the best ... when u are learn programming will with python then start with js basic's and then (react native) or flutter and also u can use java for mobile development bur i recommend first choices ..and for Desktop application java is have an amazing library (java fx ) for this type of application's and C# is one of most powerful language's for software development . good luck

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Recommends
Python
Java

While I've seen many people recommend Java (and I agree with them), I think you can learn both. But it depends on how much time you got. I recommend you first learn Java. Then python will be easy to learn, and focus mainly on modules for graphs. The reason why I recommend to learn both is because python is much better and easier to code about statistical analysis. But again do this only if you have time to just learn them.

If your project doesn't have anything to do with statistics and data analysis (I'm pretty sure you do though), learn only java. Also if you are wondering why I never mentioned JavaScript (JS), it's because i really don't recommend it. JS is much harder to learn and requires a lot of lines of code to do simple things.

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My advice to anyone learning to program is to not obsess on the language.. You SHOULD learn all languages.. Same as learning human spoken languages - the more you learn, the more ways your mind can interpret a new problem set. Learning them at the same time isn't a big deal (just like growing up in a bilingual home). Your language and your software stack are guaranteed to change 3 times in your career. Don't assume you're going to choose the "right one". And you wont waste any time learning one you never wind up using.

As a person who works on linux and OSX desktops, I have a personal bias against working for companies and software stacks that require C# or Visual Studio. But this is not due to their technical merits, but instead the OS as a platform condusive to efficient CLI toolchains and container management. But aside from that, I can use vi/IntelliJ-suite to write most languages, so language isn't a real concern. If you're windows bound, pretty much everything is available to you (through VMs and docker).

Ideally you do at least SOME full stack development learning. This means you'll need javascript, and thus nodejs would be a good stack to learn. If you ultimately like gaming or 3D, you might need C# and certainly python.

Any AI (which is a hot employment topic for the forseeable future) would like python skillz.

I personally love Java (and Android's Kotlin varient) for it's very very well designed multi-threaded libraries. go and rust are newer and thus do a slightly better job at this, but due to the open-source nature of java and editors that auto-reveal function call source code, it's very easy to learn how vendors implemented MT code and various other algorithms. Python should be equally "open" to 3rd party library review (and thus again how they solve complex problems), though a lot of times, I see python resorting to compiled C-libraries (and thus the cost to crack open the code and or trace through the code becomes too burdensome to bother).

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Recommends
Java

Since your instructor is using Java, i'd start with Java. If you want to get into mobile development, I'd check out flutter / dart. Good luck!

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Anthony Simon
Lead Engineer at Stylight · | 2 upvotes · 42K views

Ever posted an image on Instagram, watched a video on Youtube, or uploaded a file to Dropbox? You ran Python code each time you did any of those.

When starting out, you really can't go wrong with any language. What matters is to learn, try, repeat. You want to be able to build complete small project, not hello world in every language possible. By building small, but complete projects, you're learning to solve problems, not programming languages.

However, if I had to pick, I'd go with Python first, and add Javascript if you're building a frontend. The reason being, with Python you can do almost anything Java can with 20% of the effort. And that is a huge motivator.

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Srikanth Gopalakrishnan
WIreless Security Intern at Aruba Networks · | 2 upvotes · 41.6K views
Recommends
Python
Java

Although java seems to be a good fit for you. It is a cumbersome language to get started out. It will be far easier for you to learn Python and stick with it long term. This is due to the fact you will be easily able to google things for python and you will spend less time learning the language, and more time using it to do what you want.

Making mobile apps is easier with Java due to the fact that google does not directly support app building with python. If this is your biggest priority stick with Java.

Javascript: This language is the best language to learn if you are making a website. However, for easy of use you can do all the database access stuff with python. And send back the data to your website. Javascript is also another cumbersome language in my opinion.

Each language has its use. If I were In your situation, I would choose the language that's easy to start with.

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Recommends
Java

It would be great if you first go with Java. It could give you complete understanding of programming concepts. Such as data types. Later you can move to Python , which is great for data processing and Machin learning stuff.

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There is always trade off between them. If you want to make mobile app JavaScript is better. I suggest start the one you feel more close and learn all of them :) You are quite young you have enough time for them.

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Decisions about Akka and Python

We’re a new startup so we need to be able to deliver quick changes as we find our product market fit. We’ve also got to ensure that we’re moving money safely, and keeping perfect records. The technologies we’ve chosen mix mature but well maintained frameworks like Django, with modern web-first and api-first front ends like GraphQL, NextJS, and Chakra. We use a little Golang sparingly in our backend to ensure that when we interact with financial services, we do so with statically compiled, strongly typed, and strictly limited and reviewed code.

You can read all about it in our linked blog post.

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Timm Stelzer
Software Engineer at Flexperto GmbH · | 18 upvotes · 155.5K views

We have a lot of experience in JavaScript, writing our services in NodeJS allows developers to transition to the back end without any friction, without having to learn a new language. There is also the option to write services in TypeScript, which adds an expressive type layer. The semi-shared ecosystem between front and back end is nice as well, though specifically NodeJS libraries sometimes suffer in quality, compared to other major languages.

As for why we didn't pick the other languages, most of it comes down to "personal preference" and historically grown code bases, but let's do some post-hoc deduction:

Go is a practical choice, reasonably easy to learn, but until we find performance issues with our NodeJS stack, there is simply no reason to switch. The benefits of using NodeJS so far outweigh those of picking Go. This might change in the future.

PHP is a language we're still using in big parts of our system, and are still sometimes writing new code in. Modern PHP has fixed some of its issues, and probably has the fastest development cycle time, but it suffers around modelling complex asynchronous tasks, and (on a personal note) lack of support for writing in a functional style.

We don't use Python, Elixir or Ruby, mostly because of personal preference and for historic reasons.

Rust, though I personally love and use it in my projects, would require us to specifically hire for that, as the learning curve is quite steep. Its web ecosystem is OK by now (see https://www.arewewebyet.org/), but in my opinion, it is still no where near that of the other web languages. In other words, we are not willing to pay the price for playing this innovation card.

Haskell, as with Rust, I personally adore, but is simply too esoteric for us. There are problem domains where it shines, ours is not one of them.

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With Python + Django it was so much faster to create a typical website like this. Using Go would take to long to launch the initial version. For example, Python could handle complex data type with less line of code. Django also has many built-in libraries and a huge ecosystem of libraries that can be easily used to build a feature.

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Pros of Akka
Pros of Python
  • 29
    Great concurrency model
  • 15
    Fast
  • 10
    Actor Library
  • 9
    Open source
  • 6
    Resilient
  • 5
    Message driven
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 928
    Readable code
  • 817
    Beautiful code
  • 768
    Rapid development
  • 671
    Large community
  • 418
    Open source
  • 379
    Elegant
  • 268
    Great community
  • 261
    Object oriented
  • 209
    Dynamic typing
  • 70
    Great standard library
  • 52
    Very fast
  • 48
    Functional programming
  • 35
    Scientific computing
  • 33
    Easy to learn
  • 30
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Matlab alternative
  • 23
    Productivity
  • 22
    Easy to read
  • 19
    Simple is better than complex
  • 17
    It's the way I think
  • 17
    Imperative
  • 15
    Very programmer and non-programmer friendly
  • 14
    Powerful
  • 14
    Free
  • 13
    Fast and simple
  • 13
    Powerfull language
  • 12
    Scripting
  • 9
    Machine learning support
  • 9
    Explicit is better than implicit
  • 8
    Unlimited power
  • 8
    Ease of development
  • 7
    Import antigravity
  • 7
    Clear and easy and powerfull
  • 6
    It's lean and fun to code
  • 6
    Print "life is short, use python"
  • 5
    Flat is better than nested
  • 5
    Fast coding and good for competitions
  • 5
    There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious
  • 5
    Python has great libraries for data processing
  • 5
    High Documented language
  • 5
    I love snakes
  • 5
    Although practicality beats purity
  • 5
    Great for tooling
  • 4
    Readability counts
  • 3
    CG industry needs
  • 3
    Beautiful is better than ugly
  • 3
    Multiple Inheritence
  • 3
    Complex is better than complicated
  • 3
    Great for analytics
  • 3
    Socially engaged community
  • 3
    Rapid Prototyping
  • 3
    Lists, tuples, dictionaries
  • 3
    Plotting
  • 2
    Generators
  • 2
    Simple and easy to learn
  • 2
    Import this
  • 2
    No cruft
  • 2
    Easy to learn and use
  • 2
    List comprehensions
  • 2
    Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules
  • 2
    Now is better than never
  • 2
    If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad id
  • 2
    If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a g
  • 1
    Many types of collections
  • 1
    Better outcome
  • 1
    Batteries included
  • 1
    Ys
  • 1
    Good
  • 1
    Pip install everything
  • 1
    Easy to setup and run smooth
  • 1
    Because of Netflix
  • 1
    Flexible and easy
  • 1
    Web scraping
  • 1
    Should START with this but not STICK with This
  • 1
    Powerful language for AI
  • 1
    It is Very easy , simple and will you be love programmi
  • 1
    Only one way to do it
  • 1
    A-to-Z
  • 0
    Pro
  • 0
    Powerful

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Cons of Akka
Cons of Python
  • 3
    Mixing futures with Akka tell is difficult
  • 2
    Closing of futures
  • 2
    No type safety
  • 1
    Typed actors still not stable
  • 0
    Very difficult to refactor
  • 50
    Still divided between python 2 and python 3
  • 27
    Performance impact
  • 26
    Poor syntax for anonymous functions
  • 19
    Package management is a mess
  • 19
    GIL
  • 13
    Too imperative-oriented
  • 12
    Hard to understand
  • 11
    Dynamic typing
  • 9
    Very slow
  • 8
    Not everything is expression
  • 7
    Explicit self parameter in methods
  • 7
    Indentations matter a lot
  • 6
    Poor DSL capabilities
  • 6
    No anonymous functions
  • 6
    Requires C functions for dynamic modules
  • 5
    Threading
  • 5
    The "lisp style" whitespaces
  • 5
    Hard to obfuscate
  • 4
    Fake object-oriented programming
  • 4
    Incredibly slow
  • 4
    Lack of Syntax Sugar leads to "the pyramid of doom"
  • 4
    The benevolent-dictator-for-life quit
  • 3
    Official documentation is unclear.
  • 3
    Circular import
  • 3
    Not suitable for autocomplete
  • 1
    Training wheels (forced indentation)
  • 1
    Meta classes

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What is Akka?

Akka is a toolkit and runtime for building highly concurrent, distributed, and resilient message-driven applications on the JVM.

What is Python?

Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.

Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

What companies use Akka?
What companies use Python?
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What tools integrate with Akka?
What tools integrate with Python?

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What are some alternatives to Akka and Python?
Spring
A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments.
Scala
Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.
Erlang
Some of Erlang's uses are in telecoms, banking, e-commerce, computer telephony and instant messaging. Erlang's runtime system has built-in support for concurrency, distribution and fault tolerance. OTP is set of Erlang libraries and design principles providing middle-ware to develop these systems.
Kafka
Kafka is a distributed, partitioned, replicated commit log service. It provides the functionality of a messaging system, but with a unique design.
Spring Boot
Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration.
See all alternatives
How developers use Akka and Python
Exchange rates API uses
Python

Beautiful is better than ugly.

Explicit is better than implicit.

Simple is better than complex.

Complex is better than complicated.

Flat is better than nested.

Sparse is better than dense.

Readability counts.

Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.

Although practicality beats purity.

Errors should never pass silently.

Unless explicitly silenced.

In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.

There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.

Now is better than never.

Although never is often better than right now.

If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.

If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

Web Dreams uses
Python

To me, this is by far the best programming language. Why? Because it’s the only language that really got me going after trying to get into programming with Java for a while. Python is powerful, easy to learn, and gets you to unsderstand other languages more once you understand it. Did I state I love the python language? Well, I do..

ttandon uses
Python

Backend server for analysis of image samples from iPhone microscope lens. Chose this because of familiarity. The number one thing that I've learned at hackathons is that work exclusively with what you're 100% comfortable with. I use Python extensively at my day job at Wit.ai, so it was the obvious choice for the bulk of my coding.

papaver uses
Python

been a pythoner for around 7 years, maybe longer. quite adept at it, and love using the higher constructs like decorators. was my goto scripting language until i fell in love with clojure. python's also the goto for most vfx studios and great for the machine learning. numpy and pyqt for the win.

papaver uses
Akka

we used akka as our concurrency system at talenthouse. had the chance to write several worker. we used both akka messaging and rabbitmq to communicate. quite a slick system, was fun writing it in scala.

Blood Bot uses
Python

Large swaths of resources built for python to achieve natural language processing. (We are in the process of deprecating the services written in python and porting them over to Javascript and node)

fileee GmbH uses
Akka

Akka powers our asynchronous document upload processor, handling e.g. tasks for OCR, thumbnail generation and document analysis.