AlaSQL聽vs聽MySQL

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AlaSQL

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AlaSQL vs MySQL: What are the differences?

What is AlaSQL? *JavaScript SQL Database for Browser and Node.js *. Open source SQL database for Javascript with a strong focus on query speed and datasource flexibility for relational data, schemaless data, and graph data. Works in your browser, Node.js and Cordova. Handles both traditional relational tables and nested JSON data (NoSQL). Export, store, and import data from localStorage, IndexedDB, and Excel.

What is MySQL? The world's most popular open source database. The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.

AlaSQL and MySQL can be categorized as "Databases" tools.

AlaSQL and MySQL are both open source tools. It seems that AlaSQL with 4.51K GitHub stars and 438 forks on GitHub has more adoption than MySQL with 3.98K GitHub stars and 1.56K GitHub forks.

Advice on AlaSQL and MySQL
Needs advice
on
MySQL
and
MongoDB

Hello, I am developing a new project with an internal chat between users. Also, there are complex relationships between the other project entities but I wolud like to build something scalable and fast and right now I am designing the data model. What kind of database would you recommend me to manage all application data? relational like MySQL, no relational like MongoDB or a mixed one? Thank you

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Replies (6)
Recommends
PostgreSQL

In MongoDB, a write operation is atomic on the level of a single document, so it's harder to deal with consistency without transactions.

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Recommends
ArangoDB

If you are trying with "complex relationships", give a chance to learn ArangoDB and Graph databases. Its database structures allow doing this with faster and simpler queries. The database is not as strict as others and allows arbitrary data. The data model is really like a neural network and you will never need foreign keys tables anymore. In Udemy there is a free course about it to get started.

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Recommends
MongoDB

MongoDB supports horizontal scaling through Sharding , distributing data across several machines and facilitating high throughput operations with large sets of data. ... Sharding allows you to add additional instances to increase capacity when required

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Kit Ruparel
Recommends
Apache Aurora

The most important question is where are you planning to host? On-premise, or in the cloud.

Particularly if you are planning to host in either AWS or Azure, then your first point of call should be the PaaS (Platform as a Service) databases supplied by these vendors, as you will find yourself requiring a lot less effort to support them, much easier Disaster Recovery options, and also, depending on how PAYG the database is that you use, potentially also much cheaper costs than having a dedicated database server.

Your question regards 'Relational or not' is obviously key, and you need to consider both your required data structure, as well as the ACID requirements of your application model, as well as the non-functional requirements in terms of scalability, resilience, whether you want security authorisation at the highest application tier, or right down to 'row' level in the database, etc. - however please don't fall into the trap of considering 'NoSQL' as being single category. MongoDB, with its document-store type solution is a very different model to key-value-pair stores (like AWS DynamoDB), or column stores (like AWS RedShift) or for more complex data relationships, Entity Graph Stores (like AWS Neptune), to stores designed for tokenisation and text search (ElasticSearch) etc.

Also critical in all this is how many items you believe you need to index by. RDBMS/SQL stores are great for having as many indexes as you want, other than the slow-down in write speed, whereas databases like Amazon DynamoDB provide blisteringly fast read/write performance, but are very limited on key indexing capabilities.

It feels like you have most experience with SQL/RDBMS technologies, so for the simplest learning curve, and if your application fits it, then I'd personally start by looking at AWS Aurora https://aws.amazon.com/rds/aurora/ .

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Daniel Mwakanema
Software Developer at Kuunika - Data for Action | 2 upvotes 路 147.9K views
Recommends
MySQL

FIrstly, it may help if you explain what you mean by "complex relationships between project entities". Secondly, you can build a fast and scalable solution using either. With that said however, the data sounds relational so I would recommend MySQL.

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RODIALSON Tojo
FullStack Developer / CTO at O2Development | 2 upvotes 路 148K views
Recommends
MySQL

I think, Its depend of your project type and your skills. MySQL is good and simple for maintenance but MongoDB need more skills and knowledge. If you work on little project, use MySQL. For your project type, MySQL is enough after you can migrate with PostgreSQL

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Prithvi Singh
Application Developer at Montaigne Smart Business Solutions | 8 upvotes 路 199.8K views
Needs advice
on
PostgreSQL
MySQL
and
MongoDB

I am going to work on a real estate project and have to decide on a database. Now, SQL databases can be very efficient if appropriately designed. More relations between the data and less redundancy. But with a #NoSQL database, the development time is reduced, and it is easy to query. Since this is my first time working on the real estate domain, I would like to pick a database that would be efficient in the long run.

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Replies (4)
Aric Fedida
Founder, CTO at ASK Technologies Inc | 15 upvotes 路 191.7K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

I recommend PostgreSQL as it鈥檚 the most powerful out of the 3 databases you mentioned. It supports JSON objects so you can mimic the MongoDB functionality, but I would also argue that SQL is actually quite powerful and in many cases significantly easier to work with than with NoSQL databases.

Stay away from foreign keys, keep it fast and simple. Define your data structures well in advance. Try to model your data structures based on your system鈥檚 vision; based on where it鈥檚 going and not based solely on what you currently need it to do. This will help you avoid drastic changes to your database after your system is launched. Populate the database with fake data and run tests. PostgreSQL allows you to create Views from multiple tables. Try to create those views and make sure you can easily create useful views from multiple tables. Run an Explain on those view queries to make sure you created your indexes correctly. Make sure it鈥檚 fast!

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Matthew Rothstein
Recommends
PostgreSQL

Any of those three databases are going to be efficient, scalable, and reliable in the long term if you configure and use them correctly. They all also have solid hosting solutions.

All things being equal, I would agree with other posters that Postgres is my preference among the three, but there are caveats.

MongoDB and MySQL have better support for mutli-region replication in your big three cloud environments. Azure recently bought Citus Data, which was a best-in-class Postgres replication solution, so they might be the only one I trust to provide cross-region replication at the moment.

If you have a single region deployment and are on AWS, I can't recommend Aurora Postgres highly enough. It's a very good implementation and extremely performant.

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Josh Dzielak
Co-Founder & CTO at Orbit | 4 upvotes 路 188.7K views
Recommends
PostgreSQL

I'll second another piece of advice. Postgresql's JSON columns are a dream when it comes to productivity and I use them frequently with our Rails application. In these cases, no migration is required to change schema. We store payloads with dozens or hundreds of keys and performance has not been an issue. We also have a lot of relational tables, so the joins we get with SQL are very important to us and hard to replicate with a NoQL solution.

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Danilo Kaltner
Recommends
PostgreSQL

That really depends of where do you see you application in the long run. On any application, any of those choices are excellent. You could argue about good support on JSON binaries, but even MySQL has an excellent support for that on the latest versions.

On the long run, when your application gets hundreds of thousands of requests per second, you might start thinking about how many inputs you will have in the database compared to the outputs. PostgresSQL it鈥檚 excellent at giving you outputs, but table corruption can happen when you start receiving this massive number of inputs (Which was the reason Uber switched from Postgres to MySQL)

On our OPS Platform at CTO.ai , we decided to use Postgres, because we need a reliable and agile way to send the output to our users, so that was out best choice in the long run for our product.

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Needs advice
on
MySQL
and
MSSQL

We are planning to migrate one of my applications from MSSQL to MySQL. Can someone help me with the version to select?. I have a strong inclination towards MySql 5.7. But, I see there are some standout features added in Mysql 8.0 like JSON_TABLE. Just wanted to know if the newer version has not compromised on its speed while giving out some add on features.

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Replies (2)
Rafey Iqbal Rahman
Cofounder at Wanderloop | 6 upvotes 路 59.7K views
Recommends
MySQL
at

MySQL 8.0 is significantly better than MySQL 5.7. For all InnoDB row operations, you'll see a great performance improvement. Also, the time taken to process transactions is lower in MySQL 8.0. Moreover, there has been an improvement in managing read and read/write workloads.

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Jeremy Jones
Digital Developer at SpeakUnique | 5 upvotes 路 59.5K views
Recommends
MySQL

MySQL AB doesn't implement anything in MySQL until they can find a way to do it efficiently and, often, more efficiently than other systems. So although I don't have experience with benchmarking JSON_TABLEs or similar new features, their development philosophy alone suggests that version 8 for the latest features would be a safe jump without sacrificing system performance.

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Decisions about AlaSQL and MySQL
Kyle Harrison
Web Application Developer at Fortinet | 11 upvotes 路 252K views

MySQL has a lot of strengths working for it. It's simple and easy to set up and use. It's JSON engine is also really good these days. Mongo is also simple to setup and use, and it's speed as a document-object storage engine is first class.

Where Postgres has both beat is in it's combining of all of the features that make both MySQL and Mongo great, while adding on enterprise grade level scalability and replication. It's Postgres' stability and robustness, while still fulfilling the roles of it's contemporaries extremely well that edge Postgre for me.

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When I was new with web development, I was using PHP for backend and MySQL for database. But after improving my JS skills, I chosen Node.js. Because of too many reasons including npm, express, community, fast coding and etc. MongoDB is so good for using with Node.js. If your JS skills are enough good, I recommend to migrate to Node.js and MongoDB.

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David 脰sterreicher

Easier scalability of MongoDB prompted this migration from MySQL.

As Runtastic grew, at some point it would have outgrown our MySQL installation. We looked for a couple of alternatives and found MongoDB as a great replacement for our use case. Read how a migration of live data from one database to another worked for us.

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Pros of AlaSQL
Pros of MySQL
    Be the first to leave a pro
    • 790
      Sql
    • 673
      Free
    • 557
      Easy
    • 525
      Widely used
    • 485
      Open source
    • 180
      High availability
    • 158
      Cross-platform support
    • 103
      Great community
    • 78
      Secure
    • 75
      Full-text indexing and searching
    • 25
      Fast, open, available
    • 14
      SSL support
    • 13
      Reliable
    • 13
      Robust
    • 8
      Enterprise Version
    • 7
      Easy to set up on all platforms
    • 2
      NoSQL access to JSON data type
    • 1
      Replica Support
    • 1
      Easy, light, scalable
    • 1
      Relational database
    • 1
      Sequel Pro (best SQL GUI)

    Sign up to add or upvote prosMake informed product decisions

    Cons of AlaSQL
    Cons of MySQL
      Be the first to leave a con
      • 14
        Owned by a company with their own agenda
      • 1
        Can't roll back schema changes

      Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

      What is AlaSQL?

      Open source SQL database for Javascript with a strong focus on query speed and datasource flexibility for relational data, schemaless data, and graph data. Works in your browser, Node.js and Cordova. Handles both traditional relational tables and nested JSON data (NoSQL). Export, store, and import data from localStorage, IndexedDB, and Excel.

      What is MySQL?

      The MySQL software delivers a very fast, multi-threaded, multi-user, and robust SQL (Structured Query Language) database server. MySQL Server is intended for mission-critical, heavy-load production systems as well as for embedding into mass-deployed software.

      Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

      What companies use AlaSQL?
      What companies use MySQL?
      See which teams inside your own company are using AlaSQL or MySQL.
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      What tools integrate with AlaSQL?
      What tools integrate with MySQL?

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      Dec 8 2020 at 5:50PM

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      What are some alternatives to AlaSQL and MySQL?
      SQLite
      SQLite is an embedded SQL database engine. Unlike most other SQL databases, SQLite does not have a separate server process. SQLite reads and writes directly to ordinary disk files. A complete SQL database with multiple tables, indices, triggers, and views, is contained in a single disk file.
      Lovefield
      Written in JavaScript, works cross-browser. Provides SQL-like APIs that are fast, safe, and easy to use.
      Pouchdb
      PouchDB enables applications to store data locally while offline, then synchronize it with CouchDB and compatible servers when the application is back online, keeping the user's data in sync no matter where they next login.
      IndexedDB
      This API uses indexes to enable high-performance searches of this data. While Web Storage is useful for storing smaller amounts of data, it is less useful for storing larger amounts of structured data.
      LokiJS
      LokiJS is a document oriented database written in javascript, published under MIT License. Its purpose is to store javascript objects as documents in a nosql fashion and retrieve them with a similar mechanism. Runs in node (including cordova/phonegap and node-webkit), nativescript and the browser.
      See all alternatives